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Lit Circles: Rebooted for CCSS and the 4Cs

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Lit Circles: Rebooted for CCSS and the 4Cs

  1. 1. LIT CIRCLES Rebooted For The 4Câs And
  2. 2. The SEVEN Demands of Comprehension
  3. 3. These kinds of activities are not rich enough to provide the 7 skills
  4. 4. The RICHNESS of Lit Circles
  5. 5. LIT CIRCLE PITFALLS
  6. 6. HOW TO NOT BREAK LIT CIRCLES Do: Make all the kids do all the jobs, collaboratively Do: Give work that is academic and skill based Don’t split up the jobs Don’t give unfocused, artsy jobs Do: Refresh the form every 4-6 weeks Don’t keep the same form all year Don’t make kids read the entire book before beginning any work Do: Have kids discuss where they are “so far”
  7. 7. LIT CIRCLE PITFALLS Is it academic? Is it creative? Is it interesting? Does it make kids better readers? Do they enjoy the process? Put your parent hat on, if your own child brought this lit circle home…..
  8. 8. Heed Mushashi’s words: “The Way is in the Training”
  9. 9. Or heed Gladwell: Students will cheat if they don’t know how to do the given task - Paraphrased
  10. 10. Or heed Marzano: Great tasks in Lit Circles
  11. 11. The Training. Kids do not have to read an entire book to begin Keep the training fun - use pop culture items Practice lit circles in class BEFORE letting them go home Lots of 5 and 10 minute segments WHY Statements rule:They have to explainWHY Multiple defensible answers are required
  12. 12. Fast Reps. Picture Storybooks. Commercials on 32 Pages 30 Seconds
  13. 13. The Training. Use this form daily. Watch the video or read the picture book whole class (Full size form on the next slide) Students work in groups of four to do ONE quadrant at a time All the students provided detailed, written answers The group then shares to the class DIVERGENT answers are highly regarded
  14. 14. Summarize Characterize Conflict Wishes Somebody Wanted But So Then Char vs Char Char vs Self Char vs Nature Char vs Machine Char vs Society Description Actions Dialogue Interior Monologue How Society sees them What 3 wishes would the character make? Tell why for each 1. Why: 2. Why? 3. Why?
  15. 15. The Quadrants. Summarizing. Summarizing made easy. 1. Somebody: Who is the main character (protagonist) 2. Wanted: What does the main character want or need? 3. But: What gets in the way of the main character? 4. So: What does the main character do about it? 5. Then: What was the resolution of the story?
  16. 16. The Quadrants. Summarizing made easy.
  17. 17. Char vs Char - Buzz LightYear vs Emperor Zurg Char vs Self - Is Buzz a toy? Or not? Char vs Nature - Buzz and Woody vs Scud (Sid’s Dog) Char vs Machine - Buzz in the garbage machine Char vs Society - The toys blame Woody for Buzz leaving The Quadrants. Conflict. Have students identify types of conflict as many as possible. Pushing the definitions and trying is more important than being exactly correct.
  18. 18. The Quadrants. Conflict. Great Examples!
  19. 19. TV Commercials. Conflict in 30 Sec.
  20. 20. Characterize.
  21. 21. Characterize. Characters DRIVE the story. Description - MULTIPLE and UNIQUE qualities. (“brown hair and a smile” will not get it done) Actions - MULTIPLE and UNIQUE actions (“he’s nice”, “she helps people” = too generic) Dialogue - KEY things the character says + catchphrases (“Good morning”, “hello” = not rich enough0 Interior Monologue - What the character thinks about the problem OR other characters and their actions. (The character should think about the conflicts) How Society sees them - The key= NOT what you THINK (Number one error? What YOU think of the character) Comprehension suffers without knowing characters
  22. 22. Characterize. Student Made Examples
  23. 23. Characterize. Student Made Examples NEEDS MORE DETAILS
  24. 24. Characterize. Student Made Examples
  25. 25. Characterize. Student Made Examples
  26. 26. those were good, but they lacked WHY statements….
  27. 27. The bonus:Wishes What 3 wishes would the character make? Tell why for each 1. Why: 2. Why? 3. Why? The wishes need to be relevant! Divergence is encouraged Full Bore Creativity
  28. 28. The bonus:Wishes What 3 wishes would the character make? Tell why for each 1. Why: 2. Why? 3. Why? THE WHY STATEMENTS ARE THE KINGS OF THISWORK - KIDS SHOULD PROVIDE REASONING IN A SENTENCE Full Bore Creativity
  29. 29. The Training. Play 30 second commercials Find commercials on
  30. 30. The Training. Play 30 second commercials
  31. 31. The Training. Play 30 second commercials
  32. 32. The Training. Play 30 second commercials
  33. 33. The Training. Play 30 second commercials
  34. 34. The Training. Play 30 second commercials
  35. 35. Download off YouTube. Optional
  36. 36. BUY-IN. YOUR STUDENTS WILL ASK TO WATCH AND ANALYZE VIDEOS OVER AND OVER Note: This is “close watching” as opposed to “close reading” - but the skills gained are the same
  37. 37. Workflow. Getting kids working The power of Lit Circles is kids talking about literature, in small groups and sharing their observations by recording them.
  38. 38. Workflow. Getting kids working One Two Three Four Five Groups can all work on the same aspect and then share out to the whole group
  39. 39. Workflow. Getting kids working One Two Three Four Or, one person in each group can work on the same aspect and then share out to the whole group
  40. 40. Workflow. Getting kids working Have strict timeframes. Two to Five minutes.
  41. 41. Workflow. Getting kids working Timeframes create intensity.
  42. 42. Text.Translating the skills Have students read short passages and do the Lit Circles in class, in a controlled setting.
  43. 43. Text.Translating the skills After they have had success in class - they can begin self-selecting books to read independently
  44. 44. Building TEXT-TO-SELF Connections Read a random article - find a: family, story, friend,movie, book connection
  45. 45. Text.Translating the skills A key thing to teach for independent reading TEXT TO SELF CONNECTIONS We need to get kids connecting to books, not just reading what we tell them to read. Give 6-8 students books to skim at their desks. Have them open a random page and find something, anything they can relate to in the passage. Connections can be Text to Self, Text to Text or Text to World. Then, they can write down their one thing and share it with their table group. Repeat a couple times. This activity helps build text-to-self connections. Activity:
  46. 46. Monday Tuesday Wednesday The schedule. Thursday Friday 10 Minutes of group time - work on Characters SO FAR 10 Minutes of group time - work on Summary SO FAR 10 Minutes of group time - work on CONFLICT SO FAR 40 Minutes of group time - Share/Compare all categories 20 Minutes of whole class share and discussion
  47. 47. How do I know if they are reading the book? Bad news: They aren’t But you can fix that with “Why” questions and Lit Circles
  48. 48. QUICK: Define Anadiplosis
  49. 49. Anadiplosis
  50. 50. QUICK: Write three sentences using Anadiplosis
  51. 51. Lit Log Name ___________________ Number________ Book Name__________________________________ Author________________________ Other Books by this author (series)______________________________________________ Publisher __________________________________ City___________ Copyright _________ Year ___________Number of Pages_____ Library of Congress Number_____________ Bibliography Literary Devices - find a quote, passage or paragraph which illustrates 1 of each of the following: Characterization- List 1 Example of each for the Protagonist(///Actions) 1Monologue___________________________________________________________________ 2Description__________________________________________________________________ 3Dialogue ____________________________________________________________________ 4 Actions_____________________________________________________________________ Analogy - A resemblance between similar things - Kitchen=Galley, car key is like a light switch , Babe Ruth was the Michael Jordan of baseball (metaphor does not use like or as) ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ Theme - The simplified message of the story: Star Wars- the Jedi battle the Sith, Sandlot- Boys growing up loving baseball. ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ Stereotype - Judging things by their looks - sometimes it is true and sometimes it is wrong. ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ Foreshadowing - the author gives you hint that something good or bad is going to happen - not just repeating something, but a hint about the action to come.... ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ • Total Pages Read This Week _________________ Parent Signature _______________________ Genre of the book: Fiction Nonfiction Hist Fiction Humor Science Fiction Other ______________ Characterization- List 1 Example of each for the Antagonist 1Monologue___________________________________________________________________ 2Description__________________________________________________________________ 3Dialogue ____________________________________________________________________ 4 Actions_____________________________________________________________________ in use since 1999
  52. 52. in use since 1999 Lit Log/Devices Name ________________ Number_______ Book Name_____________________________________ Author________________________ Other Books by this author (series)_________________________________________________ Publisher __________________________________ City___________ Copyright ___________ Year ___________Number of Pages_____ Library of Congress or ISBN Number_____________ Bibliography Literary Devices: Tools for authors and readers to be expert in story telling and reading. Retell them or copy a sentence from your story that is an example of these devices: Foreshadowing: A hint or bit of information that allows you to predict an ending. JAWS (dun,dun,dun...) __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Irony: Something that works out to be unexpected. Slow guy wins a race. Smalls doesn’t know who Babe is and spends the rest of the story trying to get the Babe Ruth ball back. Babe the pig is the best sheep dog. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Theme: The main idea of a story. Sometimes has a lesson or moral to it. Babe’s theme is to be nice and you’ll be okay. Dances can have themes, like 50’s or disco. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Subplot: An extra story in a story. It is an extra thing that adds to a story, but isn’t always necessary. Ferdinand wants to be a rooster. Rex in Toy Story wants to be scary, Buzz helps him. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Personification: Giving nonhuman things (toys, animals, a storm, a train) human qualities like speech (talking pigs?), feelings (angry storms?), and so on. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ • Total Pages Read This Week _________________ Parent Signature _______________________ Genre of the book: Fiction Nonfiction Hist Fiction Humor Science Fiction Other ______________
  53. 53. in use since 1999 Lit Log/Devices Name ________________ Number_______ Book Name_____________________________________ Author________________________ Other Books by this author (series)_________________________________________________ Publisher __________________________________ City___________ Copyright ___________ Year ___________Number of Pages_____ Library of Congress or ISBN Number_____________ Bibliography Literary Devices: Tools for authors and readers to be expert in story telling and reading. Retell them or copy a sentence from your story that is an example of these devices: Cliche- An overused idea, expression or word- Wazzup, Big alien fortress is destroyed by ragtag band of rebels, anything by a boy band of 3 or more singers........ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Hyperbole-A figure of speech in which exaggeration is used for emphasis or effect, as in I could sleep for a year or This book weighs a ton. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Theme: The main idea of a story. Sometimes has a lesson or moral to it. Babe’s theme is to be nice and you’ll be okay. Dances can have themes, like 50’s or disco. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Point of View: 1st Person (Uses I to describe the character)Use a sentence from the story here. __________________________________________________________________ P.O.V. : 3rd Person (Uses he/she or they, them, it to describe the character)Use a sentence from the story here. _____________________________________________________________ Personification: Giving nonhuman things (toys, animals, a storm, a train) human qualities like speech (talking pigs?), feelings (angry storms?), and so on. __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Pages read this week _____________
  54. 54. Building the forms Floating Text Google Draw
  55. 55. Building the forms Floating Text Draw tools
  56. 56. The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down Of the big lake they called 'Gitche Gumee' The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead When the skies of November turn gloomy With a load of iron ore twenty-six thousand tons more Than the Edmund Fitzgerald weighed empty. That good ship and crew was a bone to be chewed When the gales of November came early. The ship was the pride of the American side Coming back from some mill in Wisconsin As the big freighters go, it was bigger than most With a crew and good captain well seasoned Concluding some terms with a couple of steel firms When they left fully loaded for Cleveland And later that night when the ship's bell rang Could it be the north wind they'd been feelin'? The wind in the wires made a tattle-tale sound And a wave broke over the railing And every man knew, as the captain did too, T'was the witch of November come stealin'. The dawn came late and the breakfast had to wait When the Gales of November came slashin'. When afternoon came it was freezin' rain In the face of a hurricane west wind. When suppertime came, the old cook came on deck sayin'. Fellas, it's too rough to feed ya. At seven p.m. a main hatchway caved in, he said Fellas, it's been good t'know ya The captain wired in he had water comin' in And the good ship and crew was in peril. And later that night when his lights went outta sight Came the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Does any one know where the love of God goes When the waves turn the minutes to hours? The searches all say they'd have made Whitefish Bay If they'd put fifteen more miles behind her. They might have split up or they might have capsized; May have broke deep and took water. And all that remains is the faces and the names Of the wives and the sons and the daughters. Lake Huron rolls, Superior sings In the rooms of her ice-water mansion. Old Michigan steams like a young man's dreams; The islands and bays are for sportsmen. And farther below Lake Ontario Takes in what Lake Erie can send her, And the iron boats go as the mariners all know With the Gales of November remembered. In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed, In the Maritime Sailors' Cathedral. The church bell chimed till it rang twenty-nine times For each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald. The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down Of the big lake they call 'Gitche Gumee'. Superior, they said, never gives up her dead When the gales of November come early! Using the earlier materials, use this song to build a Lit Circle
  57. 57. I knew a man, Bojangles, and he'd dance for you in worn out shoes, with silver hair, a ragged shirt, and baggy pants. He would do the old soft shoe. He could jump so high, jump so high, and then he'd lightly touch down. I met him in a cell in New Orleans, I was, down and out. He looked to me to be the very eyes of age as the smoke ran out, talked of life, lord that man talked of life, laughed, clicked his heels and stepped. He said his name was "Bojangles" and he danced a lick right across the cell. He grabbed his pants, took a bitter stance, jumped up high. That's when he clicked his heels. Then he let go a laugh, lord, he'd let go a laugh, shook back his clothes all around. Mr. Bojangles. Mr. Bojangles. Mr. Bojangles dance. He told me of the times he worked with minstrel shows, through out The South. He spoke with tears of fifteen years how his dog and he, they travel all about. the dog up and died, dog up and died, and after twenty years he still grieved. He said "I dance now and every chance a honkey-tonk, for drinks and tips. But most of the time I spend behind these country bars, you see son, I drinks a bit." he shook his head. as he shook his head, I heard someone say please, please, please. A-Mr. Bojangles, Mr. Bojangles, Mr. Bojangles, dance. Using the earlier materials, use this song to build a Lit Circle
  58. 58. Don’t teach books Teach SKILLS
  59. 59. CHOICE is the only THING
  60. 60. Book levels DO NOT MATTER
  61. 61. Read together Share Report alone
  62. 62. THIS WILL HAPPEN Kids will see Irony, Paradox, Poetic Justice, Foreshadowing and more in REAL LIFE NOT just books.
  63. 63. THIS PROCESS IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN STANDARDIZED SCORES
  64. 64. LIT CIRCLES Rebooted For The 4Câs And

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