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Biol 235 - Citation best practices examples - spring 2010
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Biol 235 - Citation best practices examples - spring 2010

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  • 1. Citation Best Practices Examples<br />Examine the examples of Author-Date style in-text citation below. What is done well? How could they be improved?<br />Sample #1<br />Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection transmitted by the bite of an infected sand fly, with an estimated worldwide incidence of 1.5 million cases according to the World Health Organization (2008). Smith (2005) reports that while cases are generally self resolving within months, infection with Leishmania major can leave disfiguring scars or chronic ulcers, usually in areas not covered with clothing. Since 2003, the U.S. military has reported >1,300 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Army soldiers (Rosa, 2009). Although Jones (2004) reports that systemic use of the pentavalent antimonial sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam, Glaxo Smith Kline, United Kingdom) showed efficacy with treatment responses >90% in cutaneous leishmaniasis, field ready treatment of short duration using limited supplies or equipment was considered preferable.<br />Sample #2<br />Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection transmitted by the bite of an infected sand fly, with an estimated worldwide incidence of 1.5 million. While cases are generally self resolving within months, infection with Leishmania major can leave disfiguring scars or chronic ulcers, usually in areas not covered with clothing. Since 2003, the U.S. military has reported >1,300 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Army soldiers. While systemic use of the pentavalent antimonial sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam, Glaxo Smith Kline, United Kingdom) showed efficacy with treatment responses >90% in cutaneous leishmaniasis, field ready treatment of short duration using limited supplies or equipment was considered preferable (Wong, 2010).<br />Sample #3<br />Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection transmitted by the bite of an infected sand fly, with an estimated worldwide incidence of 1.5 million cases (World Health Organization, 2008). While cases are generally self resolving within months, infection with Leishmania major can leave disfiguring scars or chronic ulcers, usually in areas not covered with clothing (Smith, 2005). “Since 2003, the U.S. military has reported >1,300 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Army soldiers” (Rosa, 2009). Although systemic use of the pentavalent antimonial sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam, Glaxo Smith Kline, United Kingdom) showed efficacy with treatment responses >90% in cutaneous leishmaniasis, field ready treatment of short duration using limited supplies or equipment was considered preferable.<br />Trying to save as much space as possible? <br />Try using the Numbering style for citations. See the example below.<br />Sample Text<br />Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection transmitted by the bite of an infected sand fly, with an estimated worldwide incidence of 1.5 million cases according to the World Health Organization [1]. Recent studies indicate that while cases are generally self resolving within months, infection with Leishmania major can leave disfiguring scars or chronic ulcers, usually in areas not covered with clothing [2]. Since 2003, the U.S. military has reported >1,300 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Army soldiers [3]. Although researchers report that systemic use of the pentavalent antimonial sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam, Glaxo Smith Kline, United Kingdom) showed efficacy with treatment responses >90% in cutaneous leishmaniasis [2], field ready treatment of short duration using limited supplies or equipment was considered preferable [3].<br />Sample Works Cited<br />
    • World Health Organization. Really Important Recent Report [Internet]. May 2007 [cited 14 April 2010]; 234:125-152. Available from http://www.who.org/reallyimportantrecentreport
    • 2. Smith, AJ. Review of recent research about Leishmania major. Parasite Journal [Internet]. 2005 [cited 14 April 2010]; 45(2): 453-462. Available from http://parasitejournal.com/45/2/453
    • 3. Rosa, IS. Skin infections of US Army Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. Dermatology Journal [Internet]. 2009 [cited 14 April 2010]; 23(4) 673-692. Available from http://dermatologyjournal.org/23/4/673
    Sample Text from:<br />Aronson NE, Wortmann GW, Byrne WR, Howard RS, Bernstein WB, Marovich MA, Polhemus ME, Yoon IK, Hummer KA, Gasser KA, Oster CN, Benson PM. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Local Heat Therapy Versus Intravenous Sodium Stibogluconate for the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmania major Infection. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases [Internet]. 2010 [cited 14 April 2010]; 4(3): e628. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000628 <br />All citations are completely made-up.<br />