Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Presentation MCAS
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Presentation MCAS

589

Published on

Dr. Connelly presentation on the Williams School MCAS scores

Dr. Connelly presentation on the Williams School MCAS scores

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
589
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Key points: Because standards differ from grade to grade, so too does the relative difficulty of the MCAS, as well as how the test results are scaled. Scaled scores cannot be meaningfully compared from year to year. The growth model allows for meaningful and valid comparisons over time. It works by comparing students to their “academic peers” (students with similar MCAS score histories).
  • Key points: This is a verbal explanation of the student growth percentile measure. Visual and numerical examples will follow. Note that similar test score histories does not mean the exact same test score history. If asked: Growth is calculated off of the raw score, not the scaled score. Students with the same scaled scores may have had different raw scores.
  • Key points: Don’t make too much of small differences.
  • Transcript

    • 1. New Knowledge is the most valuable commodity on earth, the more truth we have to work with, the richer we become. Kurt Vonnegut
    • 2. Agenda
      • MCAS overview
      • Growth Model
      • Where do we go from here?
      • Technology update
      • Technology demonstration
    • 3. 2009 MCAS Well Done! Some Reasons
    • 4. AYP Historical Data 92.2 88.1 89.3 87.9 Math 92.4 87.4 90.3 92.4 ELA 2009 2008 2007 2006 Year
    • 5. Math 2009 Williams and State Grade 5th Grade 4th Grade 3rd 18% 7% 11% 0 15% 3% Warning 29% 21% 41% 20% 25% 11% Needs Improvement 32% 45% 32% 47% 40% 41% Proficient 22% 29% 16% 31% 20% 46% Advanced S W S W S W Level
    • 6. ELA 2009 Williams and State Grade 5th Grade 4th Grade 3rd 8% 5% 11% 4% 10% 5% Warning 29% 26% 35% 11% 33% 11% Needs Improvement 48% 55% 42% 70% 45% 61% Proficient 15% 17% 11% 15% 12% 24% Advanced S W S W S W Level
    • 7. Same Classes Over Two Years 15% 24% P+/A 70% 52% P 11% 19% NI 4% 6% W 2009 4th 2008 3rd ELA 17% 2% A 55% 36% P 26% 57% NI 5% 5% W 2009 5th 2008 4th ELA
    • 8. Same Classes Over Two Years 31% 33% P+/A 47% 43% P 29% 13% NI 0% 11% W 2009 4th 2008 3rd MATH 29% 26% A 45% 40% P 21% 24% NI 7% 10% W 2009 5th 2008 4th MATH
    • 9. Advanced and Proficient Grade 3
      • Reading
      • Mason-Rice 88%
      • Williams 86%
      • Angier 82%
      • Zervas 81%
      • Ward 81%
      • Cabot 80%
      • Memorial Spaulding 80%
      • Burr 78%
      • Franklin 75%
      • Underwood 74%
      • Bowen 73%
      • Lincoln-Eliot 73%
      • Peirce 71%
      • Countryside 69%
      • Horace Mann 57%
      • Math
      • Lincoln-Eliot 94%
      • Franklin 92%
      • Mason-Rice 90%
      • Bowen 86%
      • Williams 86%
      • Burr 85%
      • Underwood 85%
      • Angier 84%
      • Zervas 81%
      • Cabot 80%
      • Ward 79%
      • Countryside 79%
      • Memorial Spaulding 78%
      • Horace Mann 70%
      • Peirce 69%
    • 10. Advanced and Proficient Grade 4
      • ELA
      • Peirce 92%
      • Zervas 90%
      • Burr 88%
      • Ward 86%
      • Mason-Rice 85%
      • Williams 85%
      • Bowen 82%
      • Angier 76%
      • Cabot 73%
      • Horace Mann 72%
      • Countryside 71%
      • Franklin 68%
      • Underwood 66%
      • Lincoln-Eliot 62%
      • Memorial Spaulding 56%
      • Math
      • Ward 95%
      • Zervas 86%
      • Mason-Rice 85%
      • Horace Mann 81%
      • Williams 80%
      • Bowen 80%
      • Burr 80%
      • Peirce 79%
      • Angier 76%
      • Underwood 74%
      • Countryside 72%
      • Cabot 72%
      • Franklin 69%
      • Memorial Spaulding 57%
      • Lincoln-Eliot 51%
    • 11. Where do we go from here?
      • Look at multiple forms of data
        • Common assessments
        • MCAS
        • Class work
      • Carefully crafted interventions
        • Interventions during school
        • Tutorial after school
      • Consistently use data to inform instruction
    • 12. Growth Model
    • 13. What is growth?
      • MCAS shows how each student is achieving relative to state standards
        • Is John proficient in 6 th grade mathematics?
        • Cannot compare John’s scaled scores from year to year
      • Growth measures change in an individual student’s performance over time
        • How much did John improve in mathematics from 5 th grade to 6 th grade?
          • Did John improve more or less than his academic peers?
    • 14. Student growth percentiles
      • Each student’s rate of change is compared to other students with a similar test score history (“academic peers”)
      • Growth is distinct from achievement
        • A student can achieve at a low level but grow quickly, and vice versa
      • The rate of change is expressed as a percentile.
        • How much did John improve in mathematics from 5 th grade to 6 th grade, relative to his academic peers?
        • If John improved more than 65 percent of his academic peers, then his student growth percentile would be 65.
    • 15. Rules of thumb
      • Typical student growth percentiles are between about 40 and 60 on most tests.
      • Students or groups outside this range has higher or lower than typical growth.
      • Differences of fewer than 10 SGP points are likely not educationally meaningful.
    • 16. Questions?

    ×