Title I <br />By:<br />Shanda Ashby<br />Laura Beckham<br />Heather Brantley<br />For Partial Fulfillment of EDUC 4763<br ...
What is Title I?<br />Title I is the nation’s oldest and largest federally funded program according to the United States D...
Program Purpose<br />Title I was created to ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to ob...
Basic Principles of Title I<br />The principles of Title I state that schools with large concentrations of low-income stud...
Who Does it Affect?<br />Title I serves a variety of subpopulations within schools:<br />Economically disadvantaged childr...
Use of Program and Funds<br />Funding is used to guaranty that students, teachers, parents, and administrators can measure...
Qualification Requirements<br />Schools must meet financial requirements that are based on the level of poverty at each ca...
Instructional Requirements<br />Teachers and paraprofessionals must be highly qualified.  <br />Most schools are required ...
Teacher-Specific Regulations Regarding Implementation<br />Teachers are held accountable for student performance.<br />Tea...
Controversy With Title I<br />Teacher comparability is becoming a hot button issue with teachers’ unions, civil rights gro...
References<br />Bullard ISD.  Title 1 Entrance/Exit Criteria.  (2011, August).  Bullard, TX.<br />California Department of...
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Differentiating classroom instruction power point 1

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This is one of our projects for completion of Differentiating Classroom Instruction at LeTourneau University in Longview, Texas.

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Differentiating classroom instruction power point 1

  1. 1. Title I <br />By:<br />Shanda Ashby<br />Laura Beckham<br />Heather Brantley<br />For Partial Fulfillment of EDUC 4763<br />LeTourneau University<br />October 16, 2011 <br />
  2. 2. What is Title I?<br />Title I is the nation’s oldest and largest federally funded program according to the United States Department of Education.<br />Title I is a program that was created in the Elementary and Secondary Act as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.<br />It was also mentioned in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. <br />
  3. 3. Program Purpose<br />Title I was created to ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education<br />Students must also reach, at a minimum, the proficiency levels of challenging state academic achievement standards and state academic assessments.<br />
  4. 4. Basic Principles of Title I<br />The principles of Title I state that schools with large concentrations of low-income students will receive supplemental funds to assist meeting student’s educational goals.<br />Low-income students are determined by the number of students enrolled in the free and reduced lunch program. <br />For an entire school to qualify for Title I funds, at least 40% of students must enroll in the free and reduced lunch programs.<br />
  5. 5. Who Does it Affect?<br />Title I serves a variety of subpopulations within schools:<br />Economically disadvantaged children<br />Limited English proficiency children<br />Migratory children<br />Children with disabilities <br />Indian children<br />Neglected or delinquent children<br />Young children in need of reading assistance <br />Or any at-risk student or student in need<br />
  6. 6. Use of Program and Funds<br />Funding is used to guaranty that students, teachers, parents, and administrators can measure academic achievement progress against common expectations.<br />Program funding also seeks to close the achievement gap between high- and low-performing students and between advantaged and disadvantaged children.<br />It also provides alternatives to students from low-performing schools so that students are able to receive a high-quality education.<br />Students also receive an enriched and accelerated educational program.<br />
  7. 7. Qualification Requirements<br />Schools must meet financial requirements that are based on the level of poverty at each campus.<br />Children that are eligible for free and/or reduced price lunches under the National School Lunch Act are eligible. <br />Individual student requirements include those students who are scoring below 70% in the Reading and Math Accelerated Instruction Program at the beginning of the year. <br />Sometimes children are considered based on teacher recommendation.<br />Teachers may also recommend a student who is failing in math and reading.<br />
  8. 8. Instructional Requirements<br />Teachers and paraprofessionals must be highly qualified. <br />Most schools are required to have 100% highly qualified teachers and staff employed on campus.<br />Title I teachers must coordinate with homeroom teachers to ensure that curriculum in the classroom is reinforced during small group.<br />TEKS are used in writing lesson plans for accelerated instruction in the state of Texas.<br />Tutoring opportunities are available that meet the specific needs of students.<br />This allows opportunities for differentiated instruction and intervention in the school.<br />
  9. 9. Teacher-Specific Regulations Regarding Implementation<br />Teachers are held accountable for student performance.<br />Teachers and paraprofessionals must be highly qualified.<br />They must continue in their professional development which might include attending workshops, reading articles and books, and taking online classes.<br />Teachers are also required to provide proof of monitored student progress at their school district in the required core subjects as required by Title I.<br />The curriculum must be challenging to the students which in-turn gives teachers a more demanding job to perform.<br />
  10. 10. Controversy With Title I<br />Teacher comparability is becoming a hot button issue with teachers’ unions, civil rights groups, and researchers.<br />School districts will be required to provide equitable state and local resources to both low- and high-income schools.<br />Expenditures are also required to be the same in both low- and high-income schools.<br />Higher income schools will have more available funds to pay their already higher paid teacher’s salaries.<br />
  11. 11. References<br />Bullard ISD. Title 1 Entrance/Exit Criteria. (2011, August). Bullard, TX.<br />California Department of Education. (2011, July 29). Compliance monitoring, intervention, and sanctions. Retrieved from http://www.cde.ca.gov/nclb/sr/tq/tiicmis.asp.<br />Cohen, J. (2011, October 11). Harkin’s ESEA reauthorization bill makes strides in fixing Title I teacher comparability. Retrieved from http://edmoney.newamerica.net/blogposts/2011/harkins_esea_reauthorization_bill_makes_strides_in_fixing_title_i_teacher_comparabili.<br />Green, C. (2010, February 1). Guidance for the implementation of Title I, Part A: Improving basic programs operated by local education agencies. Retrieved from www.tea.state.tx.us/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=2147488052&libID=2147488051.<br />Malburg, S. (2011, October 5). Understanding the basics of Title 1 funds. Retrieved from http://www.brighthub.com/education/k-12/articles/11105.aspx.<br />Texas Education Agency. Glossary of terms, 2007-08: Division of accountability research. Retrieved from http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/acctres/gloss0708.html.<br /> U.S. Department of Education. (2004, September 15). Title I: Improving the academic achievement of the disadvantaged. Retrieved from http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/pg1.html.<br />U.S. Department of Education. (2004, March 1). Title I paraprofessionals: Non-regulatory guidance. Retrieved from www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/paraguidance.doc.<br />
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