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Introductions
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Introductions

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  • Use handout. Refer to mini W.S. on thesis statements.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Writing an Introduction• Purpose• How-To• Mistakes to avoid• Special Cases
    • 2. PurposeO An introduction prepares readers for what is to follow by:1. Engaging readers2. Narrowing topic3. Presenting background information4. Presenting thesis
    • 3. Which comes first???Introduction Body?Body Introduction?Whichever you choose, you should have aclear thesis in mind before you begin.
    • 4. Engage ReadersO Brief storyO Relevant quotationO Question commonly held beliefO Explain importanceO Pose provocative questionO Make a comparison
    • 5. Narrow TopicO Go from general to specific Opening sentence Background informationThesis Statement
    • 6. How Long????O Short answer? It depends.The longer your paper,the longer your introduction.Keep it inproportion!!
    • 7. The all important THESIS STATEMENTO Central idea of your paper Is it suitable? Is it specific? Is it significant?
    • 8. Mistakes to avoidO AnnouncementsO Too longO Nonacademic toneO Unclear thesisO Second person point of view`
    • 9. Special CasesAlthough the purpose of your paper andyour instructor’s requirements will dictatemuch about your introduction, there aresome general points to be made aboutspecific assignments.
    • 10. NarrativesO Writers may not want to state a thesis or main point, since that limits the chance to build suspense in the story.O Instead, the introduction is often used to explain the setting and introduce characters.
    • 11. ArgumentsO Take a clear position on a debatable issue and outline your direction for defending it.O May acknowledge a counterargument.O Writer’s authority is sometimes established here.
    • 12. Literary AnalysisIn addition to engaging readers, this kind ofintroduction should also:O name the title and author of the work being analyzedO suggest why your paper is useful or important
    • 13. For more help withcrafting a thesisstatement, check outour Mini Workshop onThesis Statements.You may also find ourworkshop on WritingEffective Conclusionsto be helpful.

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