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Rogers Innovation Report tackles Canadian video viewing habits
 

Rogers Innovation Report tackles Canadian video viewing habits

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More than 80 per cent of Canadians have watched three or more TV episodes or two movies back-to-back this year, according to the latest Rogers Innovation Report, released today.

More than 80 per cent of Canadians have watched three or more TV episodes or two movies back-to-back this year, according to the latest Rogers Innovation Report, released today.

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    Rogers Innovation Report tackles Canadian video viewing habits Rogers Innovation Report tackles Canadian video viewing habits Presentation Transcript

    • © 2013 Rogers CommunicationsROGERS INNOVATION REPORT:TV VIEWING HABITSQuantitative Research HighlightsMay 2013
    • © 2013 Rogers CommunicationsROGERS INNOVATION REPORT: RESEARCH METHOD• A national survey of n=1,000 respondents was conducted by Head Researchamong adult Canadians, along with an additional n=275 interviews to augment thesample size of particular regions.– Respondents were sourced from available non-probability based panels. Thenational sample size of N=1,275 provides a statistical margin of error of +/- 2.7%, 19times out of 20, assuming that panelists do not differ from non-panelists andrespondents do not differ from non-respondents. Analyses of sub-groups aresubject to a larger margin of error due to the smaller size of such groups.– The national-level data in this report has been weighted to match the nationalpopulation profile, therefore reducing the influence of regions with additionalinterviews back to their non-augmented proportions.– Fieldwork was conducted between April 3 and April 8, 2013.– Numbers shown in the report may not sum to 100% due to rounding to the nearestwhole number, or where multiple responses were allowed. These instances arenoted on relevant charts.
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications5669121822162131221567510 20 40 60 80 100Up to 2 hours 3 to 4 hours 5 hours or moreThink back over the last year and try to recall when you spent the most amount of time watching programs, moviesand events from any source. Please tell us the number of hours you recall spending on each of the items below.Averagehours5.66.82.43.1Q130a/b. Total, excluding Dont knows; bases Q130a n=1022, Q130b n= 1032; effective sample sizes Q130a n=813, Q130bn=821 (80%) Q130c/d. All On-Demand viewers, excluding Don’t knows; Weight: Population; Q130c base n= 559, Q130d basen=562; effective sample sizes Q130c n=445, Q130d n=447 (80%)The greatest number of hoursyou have spent watching……programs, movies or events in oneday during the week...programs, movies or events in oneday during the weekend...On-demand content in one dayduring the week...On-demand content in one dayduring the weekend(%)TV MARATHONS: TOTAL HOURS VIEWEDTHE AVERAGE CANADIAN’S LONGEST VIEWING MARATHON LASTED 5.6 HOURS ON AWEEK DAY AND ALMOST 7 HOURS DURING THE WEEKEND• Two-thirds of Canadians (67%) have had a viewing marathon that has lasted 5 hours or more during the weekend and half (51%)have watched the same amount on a week day.• Growing in momentum, the average On-Demand viewing marathon is less than half the length of the average viewing marathon fromother sources, with marathon viewing more predominant on weekends than weekdays.• Households with children have had significantly shorter weekday viewing marathons than households without (4.9 hours on averagevs. 6.0 hours). Males have had significantly longer weekend viewing marathons than females (7.2 hours on average vs. 6.3 hours).
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications68843647251127307537240 20 40 60 80 100Up to 2 episodes/movies 3 to 4 episodes/movies5 episodes/movies or moreSome people like to watch several episodes of a program or movies back-to-back, or in a concentrated period of time.So, still regarding the past year, please now think about the total number of episodes of a program, or total number ofmovies you recall watching back-to-back, one after the other, from any source. Please enter the numbers below.Average #4.04.61.72.2…episodes of a program that youve watched back-to-back, one after the other during the week... episodes of a program that youve watchedback-to-back, one after the other during theweekend...movies that youve watched back-to-back, oneafter the other during the week...movies that youve watched back-to-back, oneafter the other during the weekendTV MARATHONS: TOTAL EPISODES/MOVIES VIEWED BACK-TO-BACKTHE AVERAGE CANADIAN HAS WATCHED 4 EPISODES OF A PROGRAM BACK-TO-BACK ON AWEEKDAY• Viewing sessions during the weekend are longer: an average of 4.6 episodes on the weekend vs. 4.0 episodes on a weekday.• Over a third of Canadians (37%) have watched 5 or more episodes in a row on the weekend.• Almost a third (32%) of Canadians have watched 3 or more movies in a row on the weekend (a combination of 25% who have watched3 to 4 movies and 7% who have watched 5 or more movies).• Overall, 81% of Canadians have watched 3 or more episodes back-to-back or 2 or more movies back-to-back at some point in the pastyear.Q135a-d. Total, excluding Dont knows, Weight: Population; bases range from 1004 to 1034; effective bases range from 798 to828 (79%); Numbers may not sum to 100% due to roundingThe greatest number of hoursyou have spent watching…(%)
    • © 2013 Rogers CommunicationsTV MARATHONS: TOTAL EPISODES/MOVIES VIEWED BACK-TO-BACK BY AGECANADIANS 34 OR UNDER HAVE HAD SIGNIFICANTLY LONGER TV MARATHONS THANTHOSE OVER 34• Canadians aged 35 to 54 have significantly longer weekend marathons than those aged 55 or over.5.43.53.36.64.23.22.11.61.42.62.21.80123456734 or under 35 to 54 55 or overAveragenumberofepisodes/moviesviewedback-to-backEpisodes back-to-back during the week Episodes back-to-back during the weekendMovies back-to-back during the week Movies back-to-back during the weekendSome people like to watch several episodes of a program or movies back-to-back, or in a concentrated period of time.So, still regarding the past year, please now think about the total number of episodes of a program, or total number ofmovies you recall watching back-to-back, one after the other, from any source. Please enter the numbers below.AllAllAllAllSignificantly higher than named group at 95% confidence55 or over55 or overQ135a-d. Total, excluding Dont knows, Weight: Population; bases range from 290 to 409; effective bases range from 213 to330 (79%)
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications• An On-Demand Marathon Viewer has watched one ofthe following amounts of On-Demand content on theirtelevision in the past year:• 3 or more episodes of a program back-to-backon a weekday• 3 or more episodes of a program back-to-back during the weekend• 3 or more episodes of a program over an entireweekend• More than 2 movies back-to-back on a weekday• More than 2 movies back-to-back during theweekend• More than 2 movies over an entire weekendOn-DemandMarathonViewers57%43%ON-DEMAND MARATHON VIEWERS: DEFINITIONMORE THAN 4 OUT OF 10 ON-DEMAND VIEW CONTENT IN MARATHON SESSIONSQ137. Now think about the maximum amount of time you have spent watching programs or movies using On-Demand services over the pastyear on your television. Please enter the numbers in the boxes below.Constructed variable from Q137a-f. All On-Demand Viewers with atelevision, excluding Dont knows answering at least one of Q137a-f. Weight: Population; base n = 567; effective sample sizes = 456 (80%)
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications147222729323637434754Why do you watch many episodes of a program or movies in a short space of time?Quebecois significantlyless likely to say this:13% vs. 30% elsewhereSignificant Differences ByAge34 orUnderOver 3457 4156 3653 28(%)Significantly higher than other group at 95% confidence.TV MARATHONS: REASONS FOR WATCHING MULTIPLEEPISODES OR MOVIESTHE REASONS FOR WATCHING MULTIPLE ITEMS GIVE A CLEAR PICTURE OF ENGAGEMENTAND ENJOYMENT• The most popular reason why the majority of Canadians who watch multiple episodes or movies one after another is for personalenjoyment (54%), followed by almost half (47%) who like to ‘watch as much of it as (they) can’.• Canadians 34 or under are significantly more likely than those over 34 to say they watch multiple episodes or movies because ofwanting to ‘watch as much of it as (they) can,’ being able to ‘really get in to the storyline’ and/or not wanting to ‘wait to find out whathappens next.’I just really enjoy watching themWhen I find a program I like I just want to watch as much of it as I canI can really get in to the storylineI dont want to wait to find out what happens nextIt means I have less interruption from advertisementsI want to catch up on episodes so I am at the same point as friends/family/colleaguesI dont normally have time to watch much so when I get time I like to make up for itI prefer to watch something I know I like rather than try and find something newThey start automatically and its easy to just let them runIt is an excuse to get together with friends/family/colleaguesSomething elseNone of the aboveQ140. All watching in one go more than: two episodes or two movies in one day or four episodes or three movies at theweekend; Weight: Population; base n = 645; effective sample size = 513 (79%). Multiple responses were allowed.
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications1722231696312-510152025< 7hrs p.w. <1 hr p.d on average8-14 hrs p.w. >1 <2 hrs p.d on average15-24 hrs p.w. >2 <3 hrs p.d on average25-32 hrs p.w. >3 <4 hrs p.d on average33-40 hrs p.w. >4 <5 hrs p.d on average41-48 hrs p.w.>5 <6 hrs p.d on average49-56 hrs p.w.>6 <7 hrs p.d on average57-64 hrs p.w.>7 <8 hrs p.d on average>64 hrs p.w.>8 hrs p.d on averageQ110. Total sample, excluding ‘don’t know’; Weight: Population; base n = 1272; effective sample size = 1017 (80%)In total, approximately how much time do you spend watching programs, movies andevents in an average week, from Monday to Sunday, regardless of device used?Average hours 22% > 24 hours 38% > 32 hours 22% > 40 hours 12Numbers may not sum to 100% due to rounding(%)TV MARATHONS: TOTAL HOURS VIEWEDTHE AVERAGE CANADIAN WATCHES 22 HOURS OF CONTENT IN A NORMAL WEEK - JUSTOVER 3 HOURS A DAY• Just over 1 out of 10 Canadians (12%) watches more than 40 hours of content in a normal week.• Canadians 55 years or older watch significantly more hours of content than those under 55 (25.7 hours on average vs. 20.5 hours).• British Columbians watch significantly more content than other Canadians (25.2 hours on average vs. 21.5 hours).
    • © 2013 Rogers CommunicationsQ291.All who personally watch a television but have other devices available; Weight: Population; base n = 1110; effective samplesize = 871 (78%). Q293. All using a smartphone, phablet, tablet, laptop or desktop computer while watching television; Weight:Population; base n = 774; effective sample size = 605 (78%) . Multiple responses were allowed.Device % used byyouLaptop computer 41Smartphone/phablet 33Desktop computer 22Tablet 15ONE OF THE ABOVE FOUR 70A media player (e.g. iPod touch, Galaxy player etc.) 9Monitor, not part of a desktop computer 3Video projector 1Another device with a screen 2None of the above 2964594645362118151313126557General internet browsingReading or sending emailsPlaying gamesChecking social mediaReading or sending text messages.Working or studyingWriting status…Instant Messaging (e.g.…Posting photos to social mediaListening to music/radioWatching short videos (e.g. YouTube)Watching another program or movieMaking video callsOther (specify)None of the aboveWhich, if any, of the following things are you personally doing with asmartphone, tablet or computer while watching programs, movies orevents on another device in the same room?When you are watching programs, movies or events onthe television, which, if any, of the following devicesare often being used at the same time, in the sameroom, by you or by other household members?(%)MULTI-SCREEN TASKING: WHEN WATCHING TELEVISIONSEVEN OUT OF 10 CANADIANS WITH THE DEVICES AVAILABLE OFTEN USE ASMARTPHONE, TABLET OR COMPUTER WHILE WATCHING TELEVISION• General internet browsing is the most popularactivity on a second screen (64%), followedby checking emails (59%), playing games (46%)and checking social media (45%)
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications362017151414346Q294. Total sample; Weight: Population; base n = 1282; effective sample size = 1015 (79%). Multiple responses were allowed.In the past three months which, if any, of the following have you personally done while watchingprograms, movies or events on any device?Looked up information online about the program, movie or event you were watching or the actors in itRead comments/updates/tweets on social media about the program, movie or event you were watchingSent a text message to someone about the program, movie or event you were watchingChecked the program, movie or event site or social media page/feedMade a status update/comment/tweet on social media about the program, movie or event you were watchingReceived a text message from someone about the program, movie or event you were watchingTweeted the actors/presenters of the program, movie or event you were watchingNone of the above(%)MULTI-SCREEN TASKING: RELATED TO CONTENTBEING VIEWEDOVER A THIRD (36%) OF CANADIANS HAVE LOOKED UP INFORMATION ONLINE ABOUT THESHOW THEY WERE WATCHING AT THE TIME• One out of 5 (20%) have monitored social media activity about the content that they were watching, and 1 in 7 (14%) have updatedsocial media or have made a comment about the content they were watching.
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications10514313858717527909684102327425760238490Another device with a screenVideo projectorMonitor, not part of desktop computerTabletMedia playerSmartphone/PhabletDesktop computerLaptop computerInternet-enabled televisionTelevision, not internet-enabledTelevision, Any (NET)% Using device personally % With device available in householdQ100. Total sample; Weight: Population; base n = 1282; effective sample size = 1029 (80%) . Multiple responses were allowed.Average # used personally Average # in household1.6 2.21.3 1.80.3 0.40.7 1.10.6 0.90.5 1.10.3 0.60.2 0.40.1 0.20 0.10.1 0.1How many of the following devices, if any, do you, personally, use to view programs, movies and events, and how many, if any, are available in yourhousehold?(%)TV MARATHONS: DEVICES USED TO VIEW CONTENTNINE OUT OF 10 (90%) CANADIANS WATCH CONTENT ON A TELEVISION• Computers are the second most popular devices to watch content on, with 60% of Canadians viewing content on a laptop, and 57%on a desktop. Smartphones and tablets are also popular, at 42% and 23% each, respectively.• Almost 9 out of 10 (86%) Canadians watch content on a device other than a television, rising to 92% for those under 34.• Seven out of 10 (71%) Canadians watch content on a laptop, smartphone/phablet or tablet, rising to 86% for those under 34.
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications7656494739331912109975321107When eating on your ownIn bedWhen eating with othersWhen cookingWhen doing household choresWhen exercisingWhen on a phone callWhen at workWhen sitting on the toiletIn a car/van/truck/motorcycleWhen on public transport/commutingWhen in the bathWhen waiting in lineWhen at school, but not attending a classWhen attending a class at schoolDuring a meetingWhen attending a public performanceWhen attending a religious ceremonyNone of the aboveQ320. All viewing content on smartphone , phablet or tablet; Weight: Weight; base n = 608; effective sample size = 486 (80%) .Multiple responses were allowed.Have you ever watched programs, movies and events in any of the following situations?VIEWING HABITS: SITUATIONS WHERE CONTENT IS WATCHEDOVER HALF (54%) OF CANADIANS WHO VIEW CONTENT ON A SMARTPHONE, PHABLET ORTABLET HAVE VIEWED CONTENT IN BED• More than 1 out of 10 (12%) Canadians who view content on a smartphone, phablet or tablet have viewed content at work.(%)
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications804436332611863322213Went to bed lateNeglected household choresBeen tired at work because you stayed upGrabbed something quick to eat instead of making a proper mealGot out of bed earlyBeen too tired to take as much care in your appearance as normal…Rescheduled plans to meet friends or familyArrived at work late because you stayed upNot gone to planned meetings with friends or familyArrived at school late because you stayed upCalled in to work "sick"Stayed away from school "sick"Skipped/stood up a dateNone of the aboveQ350. Total sample; Weight: Population; base n = 1282; effective sample size = 994 (78%).TV MARATHONS: EFFECTS ON DAILY LIFEEIGHT OUT OF 10 CANADIANS HAVE GONE TO BED LATE IN ORDER TO WATCH A PROGRAM,EVENT OR MOVIE• Many have neglected household chores (44%), been tired the next day because they stayed up late (36%), and/or grabbedsomething quick to eat instead of making a proper meal (33%) as a result of watching a program, movie or event. One in 10 (11%)have allowed their viewing habits to affect their appearance the next day from being too tired.• Significantly more women (51%) than men (38%) say they have neglected household chores in order to watch a program, event ormovie.Which, if any, of the following have ever happened to you because you wanted to watch a program, movie orevent?Significantdifferences byGenderMale FemaleNeglected householdchores38 51Got out of bed early 30 21Arrived at work late 8 4(%)Significantly higher than other group at 95% confidence. Multiple responses were allowed.
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications431012161719203334343740525362None of the aboveSomething elseMusicalsWesternsWarAnimationHorrorEpic/historicalCrime/GangsterDocumentariesSci-fi/fantasyThrillersAdventureDramaActionComedyQ201. Total sample; Weight: Population; base n = 1282; effective sample size = 1029 (80%)And which genres or styles of programs or movies are you most likely to spend large single amounts of timewatching? By single amounts of time we mean watching several programs or movies back-to-back, one after theother, or in a prolonged, concentrated period of time% Significant differences by ageGenre34 orunder35-54 55 or overComedy 71 62 52Horror 28 17 10Animation 25 17 9Westerns 6 12 18(%)Significantly higher/lower than other group at 95% confidence. Multiple responses were allowed.TV MARATHONS: PROGRAM OR MOVIE GENRESCANADIANS’ FAVOURITE GENRES FOR MARATHONS ARE COMEDY, ACTION AND DRAMA• Six out of 10 (62%) Canadians say they are most likely to spend large single amounts of time watching comedy, and over half (53%)watching action and/or drama (52%).• There are significant differences by age: those under 34 are more likely to say they’ll watch comedy, horror and animation, and lesslikely to watch Westerns.
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications302233 3017 15490202532 3319 1652225 2332 3118 15511I let my spouse/partnerchoose whatever he/shewants to watchMy spouse/partner letsme choose whatever Iwant to watchMy spouse/partnerchooses somethinghe/she thinks well bothlikeI choose something Ithink well both likeMy spouse/partner willgive me a few options tochoose betweenI will give myspouse/partner a fewoptions to choosebetweenWell decide together OtherMale Female OverallQ246. All with a spouse/partner but no children who watch content at least rarely with the spouse/partner;Weight: Population; base n = 514; effective sample size = 399 (78%) . Multiple responses were allowed.11113949NeverI prefer not to sayRarelySomewhat…Very frequentlyWhen you watch programs, movies or events with your spouse/partner which, if any, ofthe following are ways you decide what to watch?• The majority (88%) of people who live with a spouse or partner but have nochildren in their household watch content together.• Deciding what to watch is largely a matter of compromise: half (51%) of thosewatching content together decide together and almost a further third (31%)choose something they think their partner will like.• A quarter (25%) are likely to let their partner choose what to watch, and men aresignificantly more likely to claim they let their partner choose what to watch (30%men vs. 20% women).How often do you watchprograms, movies or events togetherwith your spouse/partner?Q245. All with a spouse/partner but no children; Weight: Population; base n = 520; effective sample size = 404 (78%)Numbers may not sum to 100% due to rounding(%)Significantly higher than named group at 95% confidenceFemale(%)WATCHING WITH OTHERS: WITH SPOUSE/PARTNERMEN ARE MORE LIKELY TO CLAIM THAT THEY LET THEIR PARTNER CHOOSE WHAT TOWATCH
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications46361013151530323536374253I am unlikely to spend long, single amounts of time…Something elseReligious programsChildrens educational contentChildrens entertainment, including non-educational…MusicTravelGame showsInterests/hobbiesReality TVNews, reporting and analysisSportsDocumentariesSitcomsDramaQ200. Total sample; Weight: Population; base n = 1282; effective sample size = 1026 (80%)Which type or types of programs or events are you most likely to spend large single amounts of time watching? By single amountsof time we mean watching several programs or events back-to-back, one after the other or prolonged coverage of one event (e.g.news coverage of a catastrophe, golf tournaments)Significantdifferences by genderMale FemaleSports 52 20Documentaries 42 32Drama 43 63Significantly higher than other group at 95% confidence. Multiple responses were allowed.(%)TV MARATHONS: PROGRAM OR EVENT TYPESCANADIANS ARE MOST LIKELY TO SPEND LARGE AMOUNTS OF TIME WATCHING DRAMA(53%) AND SITCOMS (42%)• Documentaries, sports and news/analysis are all also popular at 37%, 36% and 35% respectively.• Sport is significantly more popular among males than females (52% vs. 20%), and drama significantly less popular among malesthan females (43% vs. 63%).
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications48131616202224345287848480787666ANY TV PARTYSomething elseReality TVAn awardsceremony (e.g.Oscars, GoldenGlobes)A seasonpremiere/finaleSome or all of aseason of a programSeveral moviesback-to-backA sporting event onany deviceNot hosted or attended Hosted or attendedQ300. Total sample; Weight: Population; base n = 1282; effective sample size = 1004 (78%)Over the past year, have you hosted or attended any parties/get-togethers arrangedfor watching any of the following types of programs, movies or events?Did both men and women attend the most recentprogram/movie party/get-together, or was it just for onegender? 76 13 8 3How many people in total attended the most recentprogram/movie party/get-together?37 42165Under 5 5 to 9 10 to 19 20 or moreAverageattendance7.3Q301/Q30. All hosting or attending a viewing party; Weight: Population; base n = 609; effective sample size = 491 (81%)(%)WATCHING WITH OTHERS: VIEWING PARTIESALMOST HALF OF CANADIANS (48%) HAVE ATTENDED A VIEWING PARTY IN THE LAST YEAR• Sport is the most popular category of viewing party, with 34% having attended and/or hosted a sports-based viewing party.• The majority of viewing parties (76%) are open to men and women, and the average number of attendees is just over seven (7.3).
    • © 2013 Rogers CommunicationsAppendix
    • © 2013 Rogers Communications301911 912 129382413 112 21101020304050Ontario Quebec BritishColumbiaAlberta New Brunswick Newfoundlandand LabradorOtherRegion UnweigtedWeighted15182416 161115182416 1710010203040Less than $30,000 $30,000 to$49,999$50,000 to$74,999$75,000 to$99,999$100,000 or more Dont know/Prefernot to answerHousehold Income43034224 643034224 601020304050Less than highschoolCompleted highschoolPartial/completetechnical, college orCEGEPPartial/completeundergraduatePartial/completeprofessionalPartial/completemasters or higherEducational attainment465450 50020406080Male FemaleGender284032314029010203040506034 or under 35-54 55 or overAge18304111193038130102030405060Single person With children Spouse/partner, nochildrenOtherHousehold StatusTotal sample. Weighted. base n = 1282; effective sample size = 1029 (80%)Numbers may not sum to 100% due to roundingAPPENDIX: DEMOGRAPHICSDATA WERE WEIGHTED TO THE NATIONAL POPULATION PROFILE