How's Class? Using Informal Early Feedback
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How's Class? Using Informal Early Feedback

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Informal Early Feedback is a tool instructors can use to survey students about their impressions and start a dialog about teaching and learning in their classrooms.

Informal Early Feedback is a tool instructors can use to survey students about their impressions and start a dialog about teaching and learning in their classrooms.

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  • 1. How’s Class? Informal Early Feedback – A Tool for Assessment Laura Hahn, Ph.D. Center for Teaching Excellence iFoundry
  • 2.  
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  • 6. If You’re Wondering What They’re Thinking and How They’re Learning…
    • Ask them!
  • 7. What is Informal Early Feedback (IEF)?
    • Instructor-developed surveys
      • Rated and/or open-ended questions
      • Descriptive and diagnostic information
    • Given around mid-semester
    • Anonymous student feedback
  • 8. Why do Informal Early Feedback?
      • Opens a dialogue between you and your students
      • Signals to your students you care about their learning
      • Provides another check of students’ learning
      • Enables you to identify strengths and weakness in your teaching during the semester
      • Can help improve ICES scores
  • 9. Using IEF
    • Develop survey questions on:
      • Learning topics
      • Assessment topics
      • Teaching style topics
    • Rated and open-ended items
      • “ Rate the instructor’s ability to explain key concepts.”
      • Keep Stop Start
  • 10. Using IEF
    • Develop survey questions
    • Give in-class (~10 minutes)
    • Analyze the results
    • Debrief main points during next class
    • Consult with a colleague or specialist
  • 11. Resources and References Angelo, T.A.; Cross, K.P. Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, 2 nd ed. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1993.   Glassick, C.E.; Huber, M.T.; Maeroff, G.I. Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997.   Seldin, P.; et al . Changing Practices in Evaluating Teaching: A Practical Guide to Improved Faculty Performance and Promotion/Tenure Decisions Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Co., 1999.   http://www.cte.uiuc.edu    http://www.idea.ksu.edu/papers/index.html