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Privacy Management and the Social Web <ul><ul><li>Dr. Jan Schmidt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Senior Researcher  for Digita...
The Social Web: Key Functions <ul><li>Social Web facilitates practices of… </li></ul>www.flickr.com/photos/44029537@N00/12...
e.g. blogging
e.g. Social Network Sites (1)
e.g. Social Network Sites (2)
Social Web and Privacy <ul><li>Online-based identity- and relationship management assist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation a...
Visualizing social networks
Social Web und Privacy <ul><li>Online-based identity- and relationship management assist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation a...
Personal publics in Facebook
Social Web and Privacy <ul><li>Online-based identity- and relationship management assist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation a...
<ul><li>Individual and situated use of social web applications is framed by three structural dimension which get (re)produ...
Rules: Different routines for identity- and relationship management
Rules: Different routines for identity- and relationship management
Code assisting privacy management
Code assisting formation of personal publics
Summary and outlook <ul><ul><li>Social Web provides various tools and means to articulate, maintain and expand social rela...
Thank You! <ul><li>Dr. Jan Schmidt </li></ul><ul><li>Hans-Bredow-Institut </li></ul><ul><li>Warburgstr. 8-10, 20354 Hambur...
Facets of digital identity http://www.flickr.com/photos/fredcavazza/278973402/
Further Reading <ul><ul><li>Bendrath, Ralf (2007): Der „gläserne Bürger“ und der vorsorgliche Staat. Zum Verhältnis von Üb...
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Privacy Management and the Social Web

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Presentation at the General Online Research (GOR) Conference, 12th march 2008, Hamburg

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  • Transcript of "Privacy Management and the Social Web "

    1. 1. Privacy Management and the Social Web <ul><ul><li>Dr. Jan Schmidt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Senior Researcher for Digital Interactive Media and Political Communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>GOR 2008, Hamburg, 13.02.2008 </li></ul></ul></ul>
    2. 2. The Social Web: Key Functions <ul><li>Social Web facilitates practices of… </li></ul>www.flickr.com/photos/44029537@N00/12760664/ <ul><ul><li>Identity management (Expressing individual interests, experiences, opinions, skills, etc.) </li></ul></ul>http://flickr.com/photos/mylesdgrant/495698908/ <ul><ul><li>Relationship management (articulating and maintaining existing relationships, finding and contacting new people) </li></ul></ul>http://www.flickr.com/photos/axels_bilder/1267008046/ <ul><ul><li>Information management (finding, selecting and sharing information and content) </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. e.g. blogging
    4. 4. e.g. Social Network Sites (1)
    5. 5. e.g. Social Network Sites (2)
    6. 6. Social Web and Privacy <ul><li>Online-based identity- and relationship management assist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation and maintenance of social networks which provide social capital (useful for exchange of information; socio-emotional support; stabilizing group identites; etc.) </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Visualizing social networks
    8. 8. Social Web und Privacy <ul><li>Online-based identity- and relationship management assist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation and maintenance of social networks which provide social capital (useful for exchange of information; socio-emotional support; stabilizing group identites; etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation of public spheres on different topics and with different reach / audience sizes; especially important: „ personal publics “ dealing with topics of personal relevance and aiming at rather small audiences </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Personal publics in Facebook
    10. 10. Social Web and Privacy <ul><li>Online-based identity- and relationship management assist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation and maintenance of social networks which provide social capital (useful for exchange of information; socio-emotional support; stabilizing group identites; etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation of public spheres on different topics and with different reach / audience sizes; especially important: „ personal publics “ dealing with topics of personal relevance and aiming at rather small audiences </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Users of the social web provide personal information within social networks and (personal) publics, thus shifting boundaries between private and public spheres </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Characteristics of online-based publics (cf. boyd 2007) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Persistence </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Searchibility </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Replicability </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Invisible Audiences </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>These characteristics of online-based publics call for practices of „privacy management“: ways of regulating access to personal information </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Individual and situated use of social web applications is framed by three structural dimension which get (re)produced through social action (cf. Schmidt 2007 for general analytical model) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rules : Shared expectations and routines how to adequately use a given application for identity- and relationship management in a given situation; e.g. what personal information to share on a business network or in a private blog </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relations : hypertextual and social networks which are articulated through social web applications; subcultural-, age- or gender-specific networks will [presumably] share different rules on how to engage in identity- and relationship management, which in turn will lead to more open or more closed networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Code : Software of social web applications provides specific options and restrictions for identity- and relationship management (e.g. allowing to restrict access to personal information to confirmed contacts only); „application programming interfaces“ (API) provide means for sharing data between different applications (e.g. Google‘s „open social“ inititative) </li></ul></ul>Privacy management practices: Analytical framework <ul><li>Situated use </li></ul><ul><li>Identity management </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship management </li></ul><ul><li>Information management </li></ul>Code Relations Rules
    12. 12. Rules: Different routines for identity- and relationship management
    13. 13. Rules: Different routines for identity- and relationship management
    14. 14. Code assisting privacy management
    15. 15. Code assisting formation of personal publics
    16. 16. Summary and outlook <ul><ul><li>Social Web provides various tools and means to articulate, maintain and expand social relations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mediated identity- and relationship management leads to formation of personal publics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal publics shift boundaries between private and public spheres, calling for new practices of privacy management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Privacy management happens in respect to certain social networks (= audiences) and includes both socially shared routines and expectations as well as options and restrictions layed out in software code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Routines, expectations and instances of software code should be topic of social discourse on questions like: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do I have full control over my personal information? How and when can I allow or prevent anyone else (A friend of mine? The company providing an application? An unkown person data-mining my profile?) access to my information? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Who owns relational data, e.g. the information that me and person x are friends since we‘ve met at the Tokio Hotel concert two years ago? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Should there be an „expiry date“ for personal data? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How far can privacy be regulated through code? Who is shaping and regulating the code itself? </li></ul></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Thank You! <ul><li>Dr. Jan Schmidt </li></ul><ul><li>Hans-Bredow-Institut </li></ul><ul><li>Warburgstr. 8-10, 20354 Hamburg </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>www.hans-bredow-institut.de </li></ul><ul><li>www.schmidtmitdete.de </li></ul>
    18. 18. Facets of digital identity http://www.flickr.com/photos/fredcavazza/278973402/
    19. 19. Further Reading <ul><ul><li>Bendrath, Ralf (2007): Der „gläserne Bürger“ und der vorsorgliche Staat. Zum Verhältnis von Überwachung und Sicherheit in der Informationsgesellschaft. In: [email_address] , Jg. 8, Beitrag 7, 2007. Online: http://www.soz.unifrankfurt.de/K.G/B7_2007_Bendrath.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boyd, Danah (2007): Incantations for Muggles: The role of ubiquitious Web 2.0 technologies in everyday life . Vortrag bei der O‘Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, San Diego, 28.3.2007. Online: http://www.danah.org/papers/Etech2007.html </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hogben, Giles (2007) Security Issues and Recommendations for Online Social Networks . ENISA Position Paper Nr. 1. Online: http://www.enisa.europa.eu/doc/pdf/deliverables/enisa_pp_social_networks.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Renz, Florian (2007): Praktiken des Social Networking. Eine kommunikationssoziologische Studie zum online-basierten Netzwerken am Beispiel von openBC (XING) .  Boizenburg: Verlag Werner Hülsbusch </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schmidt, Jan (2007): Social Software: Facilitating information-, identity- and relationship managament . In: Burg, Thomas N.  / Jan Schmidt (Eds.): BlogTalks Reloaded. Social Software -  Research and Cases. Vienna/Norderstedt: Books on Demand. 2007.  31-49. Online: http://www.bamberg-gewinnt.de/wordpress/wp-content/pdf/blogtalksreloaded_3_schmidt.pdf . </li></ul></ul>
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