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Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011
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Shelco she culture and behavior in dnp sept 2011

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  • Possibility: each group put their expectations on the flipchart. This will be addressed during and at the end of the course.
  • A different way of presenting the 4 topics and the 3 roles, clearly showing that it’s all linked
  • SCMM has five levels of maturity Each level consists of ten elements The ten elements are the ten most important safety culture components A simple card sorting technique is used to provide an indication of a site’s level of maturity Once the level has been established, actions required to move to the next level are identified
  • 00:16-00:30 Carefully describe the process for the ratings, before handing out the scoring sheets. Physically demonstrate what you want people to do. Emphasize that people need to work in pairs. It is particularly important to emphasize who is to be rated – it is not a self-rating – delegates are being asked to rate other people (M, S and E) in their part of DSM. As they do the ratings, check they are following your instructions correctly. As each pair of delegates finishes entering their ratings on the rating sheet, invite them to add their rating to the 3 large M, S and E wall charts which you have placed around the room. Check that each pair has entered two “ticks” on the wall-chart for each card
  • 00:30-00:50 Work through one wall-chart at a time, starting with E, then S, then M Follow the instructions on the wall-chart – note the discussion from the group. Do not give your opinion – it is their opinions and perceptions we wish to understand and record Once you have completed the E, S and M wall-charts, invite the group to look for any patterns across the four themes. Are the strengths or areas for improvement all in the same theme? Do they observe any patterns? Record any insights.
  • Particular highlight for this audience: Fit for national culture Building on what is already in place
  • Particular highlight for this audience: Fit for national culture Building on what is already in place
  • Particular highlight for this audience: Fit for national culture Building on what is already in place
  • Transcript

    • 1. Section 8 SHE Culture and Behavior @ DNP Ian Simpson SHE Culture and Behavior @ DNP
    • 2. What are we talking about ?
      • What is your first thoughts when you think about SHE culture and behavior?
    • 3.
      • “ The way we do things around here”
      Safety Culture:
    • 4. SHE Performance Development Line Time Number of Incidents Hardware SHE Systems People
      • Engineering
      • Equipment integrity
      • Standards
      • SHE procedures
      • Competence
      • Risk Assessment
      • Behaviour
      • Leadership
      • Attitudes
      Good behaviors turn good hardware, systems and procedures into a safe culture
    • 5. Managing Defenses – Swiss Cheese Model HAZARD Hardware SHE Systems Design; Machine safety Technical Integrity Slips, mistakes, unsafe acts, awareness Control INCIDENT Risk assessment, Change Control Work permits, Training, Procedures Defenses People
    • 6. What is the Impact of Behavior on Defenses? Hazard Incident Control Defenses
    • 7. Frequently Asked Question
      • What are the key SHE behaviours to focus upon to improve safety culture?
    • 8. What are the Key Safe Behaviours? Key Safe Behaviours Empirical Research by Wood Group
    • 9. Key Safety Behaviors Supervisors Ensure compliance Encourage the team Promote risk awareness Involve the team Managers Set high expectations Communicate openly Concern for people Involve the workforce Everyone Follow rules Speak up Be aware Get involved
    • 10. DSM SHE Behaviour Standard Managers Supervisors Everyone Topic Involve the workforce Involve the team Get involved Involvement Confront risk Promote risk awareness Be mindful Risk Management Communicate openly Encourage the team Speak up Communication Set high standards Ensure compliance Follow rules Standards
    • 11. An Example Set of Safety Behaviours Management Behaviours
    • 12. Validity results summary  Validity demonstrated
    • 13. Ways to use the SHE Behaviour Standard
      • Employee selection (all levels)
      • Employee orientation (all levels)
      • Setting behavioural expectations
      • Management and supervisor development
      • Enhancement of personal HSE action plans
      • Individual, team or site gap analysis, with improvement action plan
      • Toolbox talks
      • SHE days
      • 360 degree feedback
      • Coaching
      • During auditing, alongside technical issues
      • Reward and recognition
      • Contractor selection & management
      • Post-incident review
      The SHE Behaviour Standard should be built into SHE and HR management systems and practice, and reinforced at every opportunity
    • 14. Post Incident - SHE Behaviour Review Friday, May 14 th 2010 d uring unloading of a tandem axle trailer, a fork-lift (FLT) driver involved in a serious near-miss while he was driving out of the trailer. As the FLT was driving out of the trailer, the back of the trailer suddenly collapsed and the FLT slipped rapidly to the end of the trailer. Fortunately, the FLT driver used the hand brake immediately and was wearing a seat belt.
    • 15. Post Incident - SHE Behaviour Review But, rear stand not used Wheel chock in place The truck driver had secured the trailer using the wheel chock. However, this kind of trailer also have support stands that have to be put out to stabilise the trailer. This was not done by the truck driver and not checked by the FLT driver.
    • 16. Post Incident - SHE Behaviour Review X X √ Managers Supervisors Everyone Topic Proactively involve Involve the team Get involved Involvement Concern for each other Promote risk awareness Be mindful Risk Management Communicate openly Encourage the team Speak up Communication Set high standards Deliver SHE excellence Follow rules Standards
    • 17. Safety Culture Maturity Model ® Emerging Level 1 Managing Level 2 Continually improving Level 5 Involving Level 3 Cooperating Level 4 Develop management commitment Realise the importance of frontline staff and develop personal responsibility Engage all staff to develop cooperation and commitment to improving safety Develop consistency and fight complacency Improving safety culture Increasing consistency
    • 18. Ten Elements of Safety Culture Maturity®
      • Visible management commitment
      • Safety communication
      • Productivity versus safety
      • Learning organisation
      • Participation in safety
      • Health & safety resources
      • Risk-taking behaviour
      • Trust between management and frontline staff
      • Industrial relations and job satisfaction
      • Competency
    • 19. SHE Behaviour Assessment
      • Reactive
      • Audits
      • Incidents
      • Near-misses
      • Existing BBS
      • Previous SCMM
      • Proactive Gap Analysis
      • involving
      • Managers
      • Supervisors
      • Employees
      • Contractors
      • External “pair of eyes”
      Key Strengths Areas for Improvement Gap Analysis Against DSM SHE Behaviour Standard
    • 20. Pro-active Assessment Tool
      • Three sheets of SHE behaviours
        • E = Everyone
        • S = Supervisors
        • M = Managers
      • Participants work on one sheet at a time, examine each behaviour, discuss in pairs and enter ratings on worksheet
      • Follow same process for the remaining two sheets
      Enter your ratings onto relevant page How often is each behaviour displayed, when appropriate, by <managers, supervisors or everyone> in my part of DSM? Always 100% Usually >75% Sometimes >25% & < 75% Seldom / Never <25%
    • 21. Analysis of Strengths & Areas for Improvement?
      • Three A1 sheets posted on the wall (Everyone, Supervisors, Managers)
      • Individual ratings entered
      • Greatest areas of strength?
      • Areas for improvement?
      • Comments / observations?
    • 22. SHE Behaviour Assessment: Summary                               Managers Supervisors Everyone Topic Involve the workforce Involve the team Get involved Involvement Confront risk Promote risk awareness Be mindful Risk Management Communicate openly Encourage the team Speak up Communication Set high standards Ensure compliance Follow rules Standards
    • 23. People + Risks = Accidents Poor Excellent Good PEOPLE RISKS Communication Involvement Standards Risk Management Limited Awareness Limited Participation Mindfulness of New Risks Awareness of Known Risks
    • 24. Human Factors Tools
    • 25. Human Factor Analysis Tools (HFAT)
      • Understanding of behavior in incidents?
      • First step: is behavior intended or not intended
      • For unintended behaviors: Use Human Error Analysis
      • For intended behaviors: Use ABC analysis
    • 26. Human Error Analysis of Unintended Behavior Analysis is supported by a software package
    • 27. Analysis of Intended Behaviour
      • Key questions are:
        • What’s in it for me?
        • Who is in control?
      • Need to focus on individual consequences for complying with (or breaking!) the rules
      • Most effective consequences are:
        • POSITIVE, IMMEDIATE, CERTAIN (PIC)
      • Least effective consequences are:
        • NEGATIVE, FUTURE, UNCERTAIN (NFU)
    • 28. ABC Analysis For Life Saving Rules Break LSRs Pre-conditions What‘s in it for me? Comply with LSRs
    • 29. Personal Consequences Compliance with the Life Saving Rules C I N Avoid criticism/consequence management by manager/supervisor Tangible (punishment) C I P Satisfy internalised beliefs/values – feel in control Psychological C I P Feel accepted by work team/leader Social U F P Incentives (prizes, bonus payments) Tangible (reward) U I P Praise by manager/supervisor Tangible (reward) U I N Avoid criticism by colleagues/team Tangible (punishment) U F P Avoid death or serious injury to self or others. Natural C/U I/F P/N CONSEQUENCE TYPE
    • 30. Personal Consequences Non - Compliance with the Life Saving Rules C I P Satisfy internalised beliefs/values – need to feel in control - avoid need to change - different risk perception/tolerance Psychological C I P Work is easier and/or takes less time Tangible (reward) C/U I/F P/N CONSEQUENCE TYPE
    • 31. ABC Analysis of the Life Saving Rules Implementation
      • Individual Consequences
        • It could happen to you!
        • Reinforcement of required behaviours by managers, supervisors & peers
        • Consistent consequence management
        • Incentives are immediate & certain
        • Use natural work teams and leaders to promote & embed LSRs
        • Encourage discussion of doubts & concerns
        • Involve everyone – especially the “non-committal”
    • 32. Summary
      • Unsafe behavior is a key factor in 95% of incidents; therefore, it is important to know how behavior can be influenced
      • The safety culture within a group/organization influences the behavior of individual
      • Not all behavior is intended; human error is important to consider when analyzing non-compliance
      • To change culture and behavior, the involvement of the group/individuals is critical: only they can decide if and what they are willing to change
      • Managers have to set the standard and act as a role-model, but everybody has to make their personal decision about their own behaviour

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