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Gary's Portfolio

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    Gary's Portfolio Gary's Portfolio Presentation Transcript

    • Proposal Book Covers ations ral Qualific ion hitectu at Arc eek) N r cog ee (Cr tural Cente fo r Mus and Cul m 09 Museu ruary Feb 19, 20 1 W C E O R P O R AT E D INC CTS HITE A RC , Inc. amson Abrah e n and r th el, Gre n Avenue No 1Hamm to 540 ashing sota 5701 W olis, Minne ap Minne ct: Conta IA eetz, A Gary R .4534 58 612.7 .com @hga greetz 00 orated ue, Suite 8 , Incorp ven EWC1 th Boston A ou 03 400 S lahoma 741 Ok Tulsa, MINNEAPO LIS MILWAUKE E ROCHEST H STER ct: TER Conta Boxley SACRAM ENTO as Thom .3906 ted.co m SAN FRAN CISCO 918.5 82 corpora LO L S ANGE ewc1in LES tb oxley@ This docume nt printed on post-co nsumer rec laimed conte nt. GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Proposal Book Pages Etowah Indian Mounds Historic Site, Cartersville, GeorgiaCover Photo: Ocmulgee National Monument, Macon, GeorgiaMap: A plan of part of the rivers Tombecbe, Alabama, Tensa, Perdido, & Scambia in the province of West Florida; with a sketch of the boundary between the nationof upper Creek Indians and that part of the province which is contiguous thereto, as settled at the congresses at Pensacola in the years 1765 & 1771: Collected fromdifferent surveys at the desire of the Honorable John Stuart, Esquire, sole agent and superintendant of Indian Affairs for the southern district of North America, byDavid Taitt. Library of Congress, Prints and Photograph Division, Washington, D.C. Project Understanding COMMUNITY CENTERED PROJECTS It is imperative that the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Museum and Cultural Center provide a coherent, understandable and exciting architectural experience to the community. The planning process itself presents a significant opportunity to reach out to various audiences, achieve greater visibility, and become more welcoming. Effective design can accentuate the experience of arrival. The museum experience starts for visitors as they approach either by car or foot. Therefore, space planning must take into account signage, wayfinding, and the visitor’s experience from the car to the museum’s entry. A strong arrival experience can enhance a viewers’ appreciation of the exhibits, surrounding grounds and Ocmulgee National Monument, Macon, Georgia the Cultural Center itself. As a whole, the museum’s environment can expand beyond the Museums and Cultural Centers are dynamic, multiuse, buildings to the natural landscape and its paths. Interpretive interactive centers for learning, research, cultural performances information can be incorporated within the landscape to begin a and exhibits. The technological and evolving nature of the better appreciation of the collection. programs require highly specialized architectural expertise. The HGA / EWC1 Team is dedicated to the concept that each Establishing a coherent experience for visitors when they enter building is an individual and unique expression of its context and will be essential. We believe that architecture and the signature community. We will go beyond the mere exterior by focusing character of buildings can help to interpret and frame the on how individuals relate to their environment and how spaces exhibit experience and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation story. allow individuals to relate to one another—how people connect We believe that the planning process is key to designing to a building inside, outside, and around. successful museums and interpretive centers. In order to lay the The Muscogee (Creek) Nation Museum and Cultural Center is foundation for a final result that will best serve the museum’s a singular opportunity to create a memorable and lasting legacy mission, it is of key importance that the early phases of the to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the City of Okmulgee and the project be respected and not shortchanged. State of Oklahoma. For the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Museum and Cultural Center, we will immerse ourselves in the Muscogee culture and explore its legacy to create an authentic building that will add another stratum to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation geological timeline. Welcoming, clear and informative, the museum will become a new cultural destination that will speak succinctly of the GARY A. RAYMOND Nation’s living history. Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer Architectural Qualifications • Muscogee (Creek) Nation Museum Project Understanding | 1 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Proposal Book Covers e Colleg Hope Facility ent partm Mu sic De 009 l and r 25, 2 rt Hal tembeConce Sep , Inc. amson Abrah ue North n and n e l, Gree ington Ave 5401 Hamm 01 Wash sota 5 7 Minne apolis, Minne Conta ct: IA eetz, A Gar y A. R 34 58.45 612.7 a.com @hg greetz Historical Sign, Hope pe College Front Cove , Holland, olla Mi r Image: V mage: Voor ichigan. Co o hees Hal hees e urtesy of H l, Hope Co ope College llege, Holla Public Rela nd, Michiga tions. n. Courtesy of Hope Co llege Public Relations. GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • “The students and faculty are really Proposal Book Pages charmed with this facility. It’s everything Relevant Projects they dreamed of—and a little more.” College of St. Benedict Benedicta Arts Center Expansion ST. JOSEPH, MINNESOTA — Sr. Coleman O’Connell Senior Development Officer / Former President College of St. Benedict The Benedicta Arts Center Expansion has provided much- needed rehearsal and performance space that has enabled the Fine Arts Program to confirm its standing as a leading regional arts program. Harmonious yet distinct from the original facility (also designed by HGA), the expansion strengthens the experience of campus arrival by giving more definition to the main academic Mall. Since its completion in 1964, the Benedicta Arts Center (BAC) has become the premier performing arts center in central Minnesota. The facility’s 1,000-seat auditorium and 300-seat theater reverberate with acoustical precision, while the building itself stands as a modernist campus icon. HGA’s original design, drawing on The Rule of Saint Benedict, reflects monastic architectural tradition in its use of cloisters or courtyards as a unifying devise. BAC’s restrained and dignified persona focuses inward to emphasize the charged energy between audience and performer. The Fine Arts Program’s on-going growth since BAC’s completion led to a predictable struggle for rehearsal and performance space between the burgeoning Theater, Music and Dance departments. HGA addressed that struggle by designing a new state-of-the- art facility that includes: • Music Practice Rooms • Faculty Studios • Band Rehearsal • Small Ensemble Rehearsal • Black-Box Theatre • Dance Studio • Outdoor Amphitheater • Expanded Lobby and Ticket Office KEY FEATURES • Anodized aluminum panels complement original brick. • Interior spaces open to campus. • Glass corridor ushers light into lower level. 10 | Acoustically Superior Installations HGA Architects and Engineers Project Team Hope College DESIGN TEAM Gary Reetz, AIA Bill Blanski, AIA, LEED AP Principal-in-Charge Lead Designer Performing Arts Specialist Nancy Blankfard, AIA, LEED AP Rebecca Krull, AIA, LEED AP Project Architect Project Manager Performing Arts Specialist Performing Arts Specialist Steven Dwyer, AIA, LEED AP Jamie Milne Rojek, AIA Project Designer Performing Arts Specialist Performing Arts Specialist ENGINEERS, SPECIALTY CONSULTANTS & COST ESTIMATING Benjamin Gutierrez Paul Asp, PE, SE, LEED AP Lance Kempf, PE Electrical System Designer Structural Engineer Mechanical Engineer Acoustical / Audio Visual Lighting / Theater Mark McDonald TBD w/ Owner TBD w/ Owner Cost Estimator GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer MINNEAPOLIS MILWAUKEE ROCHESTER SACRAMENTO SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210Hope College | Concert Hall and Music Department Facility Project Team | 1 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 This document printed on post-consumer reclaimed content. 612.269.1622
    • Proposal Book Covers vices al Ser ession Settlement Prof nty ety l Cou e Wil Historica l Soci for th unty o , 2008 Will C eptem ber 19 S , Inc. amson Abrah ue North n and n e l, Gree ington Ave 5401 Hamm 01 Wash sota 5 7 Minne Contact: apolis, Minne IA eetz, A Gary R 8.4534 Photo: Sa nta Fe Ra 6 12.75 .comLibrary of ilroad, Illin @hga Congress, oi greetz Prints and s & Michigan Canal rp. Photograph Bridge, CrSignificanc Division, W ossing I&M arch Co fi e: Built in ashington, ning & Rese nal at218 Ca e 1935, this SP lanD.C. elmar, Suit De0 Plaines Rive s railroad br idge is the AM 8147 D 313 r, Joliet, W ol et, ill lie souri 6 ct: et County, Ill bdivided, ouis, Mis only subdivid onta inois St. L double-inters C ed, ectioberg en n Warren th Gre A rthur 8 0 rough Trus 27.28 s bri ge bu brid rid 314.7 e.com ilt in the U pper Illinoi onlin s Valley. rg @ams- ag reenbe GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Proposal Book Covers CE SCIEN RE & FACILITY in eering NATU IONS cture & Eng M OF T um Ar chite RM USEU D COLLECMuse D ENVE TION AN A EDUC NS of TIO IFICA rs QUAL nd Enginee sa rc hitect es HGA A Servic ects / ional ULL Archit P rofess EC F-A/E ERPA eering MNS- SLAT Engin oject No. D tur al and Pr chitec for Ar ts chitec LL Ar E RPAU e 400 SLAT Central, Suit reet rk St O ne Pa 5 Arapahoe 202 151 olor ado 80 De nver, C rs nginee and E rch itects nue North HGA A hington Ave 01 s a 554 7 01 Wa s, Minnesot apoli ct: Minne Conta etri, AIA Gary P .0977 30 3.607 om aull.c laterp gp etri@s MILWAUKE MN E ROCHESTE INNEAPOLIS DE STER SA OLIS R CRAMEN CRA NVER TO SAN FRANCISC O LOS ANGE LES This docume nt printed on post-co nsumer rec laimed conte nt. GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Presenta on Photo (a-1) - detail of typical column and beam Photo (a) - taken from the upper mezzanine level looking to the ground floor Photo (a) - taken from the second floor looking to the upper mezzanine Photo (b) - detail of stair leading from the upper mezzanine to the second floor Photo (e) - detail of stair and catwalk at the second floor Photo (f) - detail of semi-circular catwalk and column at the second floor Graphics Photo (b) - detail of typicalPhoto (b) - detail of column Photo (c) column, beam and - circular vaulted ceiling opening for Photo (d) Photo (a-2) - detail of typical column and beam brewing - circular Photo (c) - detail of tank opening typical column base for Photo (a) - detail of Photo (b) - detail of Photo (c) - interior room, Photo (d) - looking thru Photo (d) - view of Photo (e) - circular Photo (f) - circular brewing brewery tank and stair brewery tank adjacent to stairwell opening to main stairwell brewing relic opening for tank opening for tank tank Photo (a) - detail of main Photo (a) - stairwell room above showing grain elevators, columns and showing railings access ladder to rooftop Photo (b) - door detail; taken from room above grain elevators looking thru to space below cupola Photo (c) - truss system inside the cupola Photo (a-1) - detail of brewery tanks at top of light Photo (a) - catwalk to brewery atrium tanks under the “twin towers” Photo (b) - detail of support footings for tanks under the towers Photo (b) - interior room showing Photo (c) - entrance to “twin stairway leading tower” room on to attic space north side of under the building cupola and weathervane Photo (d) - truss system inside the cupola Photos (b, c, d) - detail of Photo (a-2) - detail of truss system and mansard style interior rooms roof of light atrium Photo (b) Photo (c) Photo (d) Photo (e) - atrium trusses Photo (f) - atrium catwalk Photo (g) - atrium glazing Photo (h) - truss system inside the “twin towers” GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Betula nigra Betulaceae Presenta on River Birch BET-u-la NI-gra Graphics Deciduous tree, usually not more than 40-70 ft (12-21 m) tall with a similar spread, rounded outline at maturity, trunk usually divided into several large arching branches. Light brown (often reddish) bark exfoliating into papery plates, exposing inner bark of gray-brown or cinnamon- to reddish-brown. Large variation in bark color among trees. Leaves alternate, 4-9 cm long, rhombic-ovate, sharp pointed, doubly serrate, base wedge shaped, lustrous medium to dark green above and glabrous below. Sun. Best adapted to moist, acid soils, will survive dry soils. Not bothered by the bronze birch borer. Hardy to USDA Zone 4. Cornus sericea (formerly Cornus stolonifera) Cornaceae Redosier Dogwood KOR-nus ser-EE-se-a Deciduous shrub, 7-9 ft (2-3 m) high, spreading to 10 ft (3 m), multi-stemmed, loose, spreads by underground stems (stolons). Leaves opposite, simple, ovate to oblong-lanceolate, 5-13 cm long, rounded at base. Fruit, white, globose. Sun. Very adaptable to a wide range of soil and climatic conditions. Does best in moist soil, in the wild often observed in wet swampy areas. A good shrub for a riparian zones. Red stems, appealing in a winter setting. Hardy to USDA Zone 2.landscape plant materials2 level office building • schafer richardson • shamrock development inc. GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Presenta on Graphics B’nai Israel Synagogue Wall of Discovery Benedicta Arts Center Artists’ Live/Work Lofts 22 | experience ex erience x e xpe Hammel, Green and Abrahamson, Inc. TA s for NESO cation n Qualifi l Desig N F MI itectura Arch O SI TY O HASE TW ER PUNIV RTHROP NO GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Presenta onGraphicsGARY A. RAYMONDMember, SMPSMarke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404612.269.1622
    • Presenta on Graphics3D-CAD MODELING / PHOTOSHOP FINISHESTRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH FACILITY - U of M• 3-D AUTOCAD MODEL (USING 2-D FLOOR PLANS, ELEVATIONS FOR REFERENCE)• 3D-VIZ STUDIO (MATERIAL/FINISHES APPLICATION AND FINAL BUILDING RENDERING)• PHOTOSHOP ENHANCEMENT (LANDSCAPING, PEOPLE, SHADOWS) GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • S O N D J F GraphicA/E Selection DesignP r o g r a m m in g 8 W eek s Programming Workshop #1 Programming Workshop #2 Conceptual Workshop Concept Design DeliverablesOwner ReviewS ch e m a ti c D e s i g n 1 0 W eek s Schematic Workshop #1 Schematic Workshop #2 Schematic Workshop #3 Schematic Design DeliverablesOwner ReviewFinalize / Incorporate Comments 2009 2010 PROJECT RESPONSIBILITY—HOW WE WORK TOGETHER PROGRAM CONFIRMATION SCHEMATIC DESIGN DESIGN DEVELOPMENT CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS BID / PRICING CONSTRUCTION HGA ARCHITECTS HGA ARCHITECTS HGA ARCHITECTS HGA ARCHITECTS HGA ARCHITECTS HGA ARCHITECTS RESPONSIBILITY: RESPONSIBILITY: RESPONSIBILITY: RESPONSIBILITY: RESPONSIBILITY: RESPONSIBILITY: REVIEW REVIEW REVIEW REVIEW Primary & Lead Primary & Lead Primary & Lead Designer Support Support Attend periodic meetings Designer Designer LEED Review for compliance w/ design Critical issues support intent PRIORITY: PRIORITY: Primarily work w/ Creative solution to SWAIM ARCHITECTS SWAIM ARCHITECTS Arizona Historical Arizona Historical Society to develop Society needs and budget RESPONSIBILITY: RESPONSIBILITY: comprehensive user Lead Architect Lead Architect SWAIM ARCHITECTS group requirements DELIVERABLES: 100% SD w/ cost PRIORITY: PRIORITY: RESPONSIBILITY: Evaluate and Compliance w/ DELIVERABLES: estimate and lifecycle Lead Architect select qualified construction documents Final program costs Cost Estimate LEED contractor PRIORITY: Conduct a pre- DELIVERABLES: Fully developed set of construction bid review for all Shop drawing reviews documents contractors Construction field reports CD’s at 50%, 90%, 100% Weekly meetings Construction cost estimates with CM Perform punch list @ RISK SWAIM ARCHITECTS RESPONSIBILITY: Support SWAIM ARCHITECTS Project administration Cost estimate verification RESPONSIBILITY: with CM @ RISK SWAIM ARCHITECTS Support Life safety GARY A. RAYMOND Project administration Cost estimate verification LEED Member, SMPS RESPONSIBILITY: Support, with CM @ RISK Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer Schedules, Schedules 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Administration Life safety LEED Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • 2. Team Organizational Chart Showing Firms, Lead Staff and Disciplines Graphic ROSS & HAWKES HALLS RENOVATION State of Wisconsin Division of State Facili es University of Wisconsin Superior Campus Design University of Wisconsin Superior DSF Project Manager Superior, Wisconsin Project Number 11 C 1 O Principal-in-Charge June 14, 2011 Project Manager Tom Hanley, AIA, LEED AP SDS Architects Principal-in-Charge Project Manager SDS Architects ESG Architects KJWW Engineering Architecture Interior Design HVAC/Electrical/Telecom Ma Long, AIA Art Bartels, AIA, LEED AP Kris Cotharn, PE, LEED AP Project Architect Student Housing Design Specialist ME Project Director Paul Kouba Nicolle VanWie, AIA, LEED AP Mike Lawless, PE, FPE, LEED AP Revit Technician Design Architect Mechanical Engineer Steve Rubenzer Ann Fritz, CID, IIDDA, LEED AP Rick Leverenz, PE Construc on Administrator Interior Designer Electrical Engineer Joe Limke, CTS-D Technology Designer SES MBJ Es ma ng Plus Ken Saiki Design, Inc. Plumbing/Fire Protec on Structural Engineering Cost Es ma ng Site/Civil Engineering Bob Novak Dan Murphy, PE William Warren Ken Saki, ASLA, RLA Plumbing/Fire Structural Project Director Cost Es mator Site/Civil Project Director Protec on Designer Paul Johnson, PE Steve Whayland Structural Engineer Civil Engineer Craig Bursch, PE Structural Engineer Contact: Tom Hanley, AIA, LEED AP, President | Architect SDS Architects 205 North Dewey Street | Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54703 O ce: 715.832.1605 | Direct: 715.852.2565 2 | SDS Architects Email: thanley@sdsarch.com 3. Team Matrix 3. Team Matrix Continued Below Team Member Projects Additional Team Member Team Member Projects Additional Team Member Team Member Information Team Member Information Experience and Role Projects Experience and Role Projects 5. Bemidji State University Linden Hall Redevelopment 5. Bemidji State University Linden Hall Redevelopment 2. UW-River Falls South Fork (Pursuing LEED Silver) 2. UW-River Falls South Fork (Pursuing LEED Silver) $11M (75,000 SF), Completion Scheduled: 8/2011 $11M (75,000 SF), Completion Scheduled: 8/2011 $8M (11,800 SF), Completion Scheduled: 8/2012 $8M (11,800 SF), Completion Scheduled: 8/2012 1. UW-Stout Hovlid Hall (Addition & Remodeling) 1. UW-Stout Hovlid Hall (Addition & Remodeling) 3. UW-Stout Red Cedar Hall (New Construction) 3. UW-Stout Red Cedar Hall (New Construction) 8. Winona State University 2010 Residence Hall 8. Winona State University 2010 Residence Hall $19M (82,000 SF), Under Construction $19M (82,000 SF), Under Construction Project Years Project Years Discipline with Discipline with $5,644,500 (45,000 SF), 9/2010 $5,644,500 (45,000 SF), 9/2010 Firm Information / Role Current Firm Information / Role Current Staff Name and Staff Name and $14.4M (120,000 SF), 8/2005 $14.4M (120,000 SF), 8/2005 $57M (204,000 SF), 12/2010 $57M (204,000 SF), 12/2010 For This For This $7.4M (67,000 SF), 12/2007 $7.4M (67,000 SF), 12/2007 Firm / Firm / $20M (130,000 SF), 8/2010 $20M (130,000 SF), 8/2010 $5.7M (75,000 SF), 8/2012 $5.7M (75,000 SF), 8/2012 Registration / Registration / Project Years Project Years Credential Credential 9. SDSU Case & Hill Halls 9. SDSU Case & Hill Halls (See keys, with (See keys, with 6. Amsoil Arena DECC 6. Amsoil Arena DECC Instructions Other Instructions Other 7. UMD Griggs Hall 7. UMD Griggs Hall Firm Firm 4. MSUM Dahl Hall 4. MSUM Dahl Hall for Filing) for Filing) Tom Hanley, AIA A 15 SES PD/FPD 5 PIC PIC PA PM PM PM Eau Claire, WI PD LEED AP Robert Novak PD PIC/PM 7 FPD MBE DVB Plumb/FP 25 A 1 SDS Architects Matt Long, AIA PA Structural 37 Eau Claire, WI PA 23 STR STR STR STR STR Dan Murphy, PE PIC PIC PIC PIC PIC MBE S/PIC — A 25 Meyer Borgman DVB Paul Kouba BIM BIM CAD Johnson Structural 25 BIM/CAD 1 Duluth, MN Paul Johnson, PE PE PE PE PE PE MBE PE 1 A 21 Steve Rubenzer CA CA DVB Structural 12 CA 15 Craig Bursch, PE PE PE PE PE PE PE 4 Art Bartels, AIA A 25 DPIC DPIC DPIC DPIC DPIC DPIC DPIC LEED AP Estimating Plus Estimator 17 Design PIC 2 Wadena, MN ESG Architects William Warren EST EST EST Minneapolis, MN A 10 MBE Nicolle VanWie, AIA DVB EST 15 DA DA DA DA DA DA DA DA MBE LEED AP DA 2 DVB LA 23 Ken Saiki, ASLA LA LA LA Ann Fritz, CID, IIDA ID 6 Ken Saiki Design PIC PIC PIC RLA/Principal ID ID ID ID ID ID ID Madison, WI PIC/LA 10 LEED AP Interiors 1 x MBE CE 4 DVB Steve Whayland M 15 CE CE Kris Cotharn, PE PE/Project PM CE 22 LEED AP PM 4 M 10 Mike Lawless, PE KJWW PE Engineering FPE, LEED AP PE — Madison, WI MBE E 15 DVB Rick Leverenz, PE PE — PE PE GARY A. RAYMOND Joe Limke, CTS-D Technology 7 PE PE Member, SMPS DE — Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210University of Wisconsin Superior | Ross & Hawkes Halls Renova on | A/E Quali ca ons Ques onnaire | 3 4 | SDS Architects Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • InterviewBoardsGARY A. RAYMONDMember, SMPSMarke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404612.269.1622
    • Presenta on BoardsGolden Valley Suite Interior Finishes GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Color Palette - Option A Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • Presenta onBoardsGARY A. RAYMONDMember, SMPSMarke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404612.269.1622
    • Presenta onBoardsGARY A. RAYMONDMember, SMPSMarke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404612.269.1622
    • Presenta onBoardsGARY A. RAYMONDMember, SMPSMarke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404612.269.1622
    • QuarterlyVolume 4 | Second Quarter 2009 THE Newsle ersChilled Beams: Enhancing Energy Efficiency By Kevin M. Pope, PE and Staci R. Olson, PE, CEM, GBE, LEED AP ADVISOR HGA Engineering Knowledge ExchangeA technology developed over thirty years ago in An active chilled beam operates as air is suppliedNorway is finding a place in the United States HVAC through induction nozzles to create a vacuum within theindustry. Chilled beams, which have been used chilled beam. As a result, room air is drawn up throughsuccessfully in Europe for twenty years and have become the water coils where it is cooled. In the mixing section,standard practice there, are emerging in the energy the conditioned room air is mixed with the supply air conscious United States as an alternative an d nd and discharged into the room via slots. to conventional systems such as nventional variable air volum r volume ume me ENER ENERGY SAVINGS NE and fan coil units. Interes Interest in chilled beam technology is related to the promi promise of increased energy efficiency. Both academic resear esea research and recent installations offer evidence that chilled beam systems can be more efficient than con conventional VAV systems. Reduction in energy costs of as much as 30% and overall operating costs of 35% have been documented in both studies and new buildings.CHILLED BEAMS The major source of energy savings results fromThe chilled beam is a unit installed at the ceiling that decreasing fan energy associated with the lower airconsists of a cooling coil which provides radiant cooling flow rates required by active chilled beam systems.via circulated cool water. The beams can be either Chilled beam systems typically require one third to onerecessed in the ceiling or exposed below it. Passive half of the supply air rate of a conventional VAV system.units consist of just a cooling coil in an enclosure, while The chilled water temperature supplied to chilled beamsactive units include ventilation air to provide additional is typically 60 degrees F, as opposed to the much coolercooling capacity to the occupied spaces. Multi-service 45 degree F chilled water required by conventionalunits can be either active or passive and integrate a systems. By operating chillers at higher supply watervariety of other building services, such as lighting, temperatures, the overall efficiency of the chiller can be To use the chilled beam technology, dehumidification of the outside air is essential fi ficatspeaker systems and information technology. increased. to prevent condensation on the chilled beams. The renovation of the University of Wisconsin (Madison) Education Building incorporates chilled beam technology.The chilled beam is a unit installed at the ceiling that consists of a cooling coil The top rendering shows chilled beams in a suspended ceiling application. The chilled beams in the bottomwhich provides radiant cooling via circulated cool water. illustration are multi-service units where lighting and other utilities are incorporated into the beams.* Dadanco-Mestek Joint Venture, LLC. Passive Chilled Beams consist of a cooling coil in an Active Chilled Beams are able to provide ventilation air to a Multi-Service Chilled Beams can be either active or passive enclosure and are the simplest types of units. space in addition to cooling, increasing the comfort level of and integrate other technology into the beams. This room occupants. photograph shows lights added to the chilled beams. ADVANTAGES OF CHILLED BEAM TECHNOLOGY IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS UNIT CASE In addition to offering increased energy efficiency, To use the chilled beam technology, dehumidification of chilled beams have the potential to offer several other the outside air is essential to prevent condensation on PRIMARY advantages to building owners and occupants. Indoor the chilled beams. This is accomplished by controlling MOUNTING BRACKET AIR PLENUM air quality can be improved with the use of chilled beams, building humidity levels with the supply air handling INDUCTION since 100 percent of the air supplied to the room is from unit. A dehumidification air handling unit and dual outside the building, offering higher ventilation rates wheel energy technology currently in the marketplace NOZZLE EXCHANGER COIL and avoiding contaminant mixing that can occur when offer options to maintain supply air conditions. The air within the room is recirculated. Occupant comfort building control system must be designed to maintain SUPPLY AIR GRILL RETURN AIR GRILL CEILING is enhanced, since noise and drafts are eliminated chilled water temperature and relative humidity in the while maintaining a more even and comfortable range occupied spaces. Maintaining these two criteria at the MIXED AIR of temperature. A key benefit to occupants is that the correct levels is essential for the proper functioning of system allows for individual room control. the chilled beams and avoiding water damage due to ROOM AIR condensation within the building spaces. Owners are also able to see secondary benefits with the system. The system allows for decreased floor to floor Chilled beams have been installed in locations across the Section diagram illustrating an active chilled beam in a heights (or increased ceiling heights) and smaller vertical country, from Massachusetts to Oregon, and can play a suspended ceiling installation. Primary air is supplied through shafts throughout the building. Since chilled beams have major role in harnessing energy savings. Used with an the induction nozzles while room air is drawn up through the no moving parts and are easily accessed, maintenance appropriately designed and controlled dehumidification exchanger coil. Conditioned room air and primary air are mixed and discharged back into the room. costs can be decreased. Another significant advantage system, they offer another sustainable strategy to increase is the lower initial costs of the installed equipment, such occupant comfort and overall indoor air quality. as chillers and air handlers, which are smaller than traditional systems and require less ductwork. GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Hammel, Green and Abrahamson, Inc. (HGA) is a full-service architecture, engineering and planning firm with offices in Minneapolis and Rochester, Minnesota; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Sacramento, San Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer Francisco and Los Angeles, California. Organized into inter-disciplinary Practice Groups, HGA offers a balanced portfolio of planning and design expertise with a focus on Corporate, Healthcare, and Arts, Community and Education clients. For information on this topic or other questions, please contact Yan Shagalov, PE, LEED AP at YShagalov@hga.com or visit us at www.hga.com 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • QuarterlyVolume 5 | First Quarter 2010 THE Newsle ersLight Emitting Diodes:New Options in Lighting Design By Catherine Hall, LC, LEED AP and Chrysanthi Stockwell, LC, LEED AP ADVISOR HGA Engineering Knowledge Exchange ight Emitting Diodes, LED APPLICATIONS commonly referred to as The small and flexible characteristics of an LED source LEDs, have come a long make it desirable for the built environment. There are way since the days of some applications for which an LED is ideally suited. One the classic 1960s Lite- of these is accent lighting, which often requires minimal Brite® toy which created light output, illumination of small details, and diligent luminescent images when maintenance due to the public nature of the lighting. multi-colored translucent Accent lighting, which includes step lights, small coves, plastic pegs were placed backlighting, pendant style fixtures, and color changing through back-lit opaque features, can take advantage of the LED’s flexibility, size, paper. The pegs conducted and relatively long life. LED use has also thrived in tasklight except where it was blocked by the paper, giving lighting and signage. The LED’s directional property canan appearance similar to that of today’s LEDs. Indeed, provide lower levels of concentrated light and decreasethere has been much interest in Light Emitting Diodes energy usage.in the last decade as they have been embraced as thesolution to energy efficient, sustainable lighting. Some LEDs can also be used in interior applications suchbackground and insights into appropriate applications, as down lights and other commonly applied ambientfixture efficiency, and characteristics of the light source lighting products. However, it is essential to use productsmay help determine if LEDs are suitable for individual g p designed specifically for LEDs. If the LED source isprojects. retrofitted iinto a fixture that is not modified to consider LED proproperties, then dimming problems, heat LED fixtures illuminate walkwaysAn LED luminaire itself consists of one or several build-up shortened lamp life, and poor optics build-up, at the Harley-Davidson Museum.diodes (an electronic current converter device er can res result. The dimming capabilities of LEDs aremade up of two electrodes and used to convert o another advantage in interior applications. LEDalternating current to direct current), mounted on unted dimmin is achieved by varying the current from dimming Temperature, light output, glare, and color must bea printed circuit board and wired to a driver, all the LED driver. If an LED source is dimmed using considered in exterior environments. LEDs used inenclosed in a housing. The housing is a critical a con constant current charge, some issues may The future looks bright for and parkingtechnology with many exciting advancements. street and area lighting, bollards, LEDs, a garage with equatelyelement of the fixture, as it needs to adequately occur in color shift or flicker. A pulsing technique luminaires must be carefully evaluated and may notdissipate heat produced by the diode. is used to eliminate these problems by rapidly always be appropriate. Exterior fixtures are composed stepping the current reduction EFFICIENCY AND FIXTURE LIFE over time. The ability of a concentration of many LEDs arrayed to create a COLOR AND WHITE LEDs OR ALEDs are electronic current Light of an LED to be dimmed is dependent on theenergy Emitting Diodes are well known for specific specific distribution. Viewing angles andLuminous are White LE Typical uniformity e LEDs come in both warm and cool color driver des design. Efficacy Range in essential considerations for creating a safe and lower- temperatures. The higher output LEDs typically have aconverter devices that change efficiency and long life. A single LED consumes one to Light Source Lumens per Watt eratu r three watts and can deliver 30 to 60 usable lumens per contrast ambient environment. cooler col temperature, meaning a bluer crisp white r color (Varies depending onelectric current into light. watt, depending on the color temperature and driver wattage and lamp type) LED light. LED manufacturers use a process called ‘binning’ efficiency. Compared to a standard incandescent lamp, der t e in order to gather LEDs that are within a range of a which delivers which d livers an average of 10-18 lumens per watt, an hi h deli delivers averag of 10 1 lumens p watt, g 0 18 average 10-18 lumens watt, Incandescent (No ballast) Incandescent (No ballast) andesc descent ( allast llast) 10-18 10 10-18 specific color specific co temperature. The tighter a manufacturer’s p cific ifi LED offers energy savings However metal halide and ff offers savings. However, binning p process, the closer the color temperature of fluorescent sources offer greater luminous efficacy than Halogen (No ballast) 15-20 individual diodes within a fixture. that of a commercially available LED. Compact Fluorescent (CFL) Color rendering index is a measure used to describe how 35-60 LEDs on the market today are unavailable in wattages (Including ballast) light from a reference lamp compares to the illumination higher than five per diode, while other efficient sources effect on the appearance of an object’s color. Color like metal halide and fluorescent are offered in much LED Current Technologies 30-60 rendering is not an accurate measure used for LED higher wattages in a single lamp envelope. LEDs are sources. One reason is because the spectral distribution not efficient when used for general illumination due to Linear Fluorescent of an LED has more specific wavelengths, giving it a low 50-100 (Including ballast) this limitation in available wattages. When LEDs are score across the entire visual spectrum. A new metric is placed into luminaires, it changes the way lumens are Metal Halide 50-90 under development for the comparison of LEDs. delivered and reduces efficiency. LEDs are significantly (Including ballast) impacted by heat at the junction point, where the circuit Cost is a significant decision-maker when it comes *Source: lamp manufacturer data. board is attached. Heat at this point can reduce the to using LED fixtures. Initial costs of LED fixtures are lumen output of an LED substantially and shorten the life There is a perception that LEDs require little still two to four times more expensive than traditional of the diode. maintenance and last 100,000 hours. Most reputable sources. Cost of replacement, frequency of maintenance LED manufacturers are currently producing LEDs that and replacement, additional heat production, fixture last 50,000 hours. However, LEDs will slowly decrease efficiency in terms of lumens per watt, and manufacturer lumen output over time (rather than fail or “burn-out”), longevity are all items that contribute to the direct and making useful lamp life harder to determine. It can be indirect costs of a lighting system. problematic when the LED’s light output decreases below required illumination levels. The future looks bright for LEDs, a technology with many exciting advancements. In lab facilities, a diode that LEDs have no filaments to break or electrical arcs to keep, produces 111 lumens per watt has been documented. so there is less chance of failure within the LED itself. LEDs offer some advantages over traditional light Complete failure of an LED luminaire would most likely sources, and when used in the appropriate applications be due to the failure of an electrical component, such as which consider their unique properties, they can be a the LED driver. In many LED luminaries, all components valuable resource for lighting designers and building are integral to the fixture, requiring the entire luminaire owners. to be replaced in the event of failure. Close-up view of a Light Emitting Diode. GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Hammel, Green and Abrahamson, Inc. (HGA) is an integrated architecture, engineering and planning firm that helps prepare its clients for the future. With offices in Minneapolis and Rochester, Minnesota; Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Sacramento, San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, the nationally recognized firm has developed expertise in healthcare, corporate, arts, community, higher education, and science/ technology industries since 1953. For information on this topic or other questions, please contact Yan Shagalov, PE, LEED AP at YShagalov@hga.com or visit us at www.hga.com 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622
    • QuarterlyVolume 4 | Third Quarter 2009 THE Newsle ersWind Generation: A Renewable Source Of Energy By Scott R. Wheaton, RDE ADVISOR HGA Engineering Knowledge Exchange WIND TURBINES The device used to convert motion energy of the wind Wind turbines of this size and type are mostly used and transform that energy into electricity is called a wind to deliver power for residential use or to supplement turbine. The blades of the turbine are specially designed commercial power users. Turbines may be used alone to capture the wind’s kinetic energy and convert it into or in concert with other renewable electric generating mechanical energy by turning a connected shaft directly systems, such as solar photovoltaic generating systems or via a gear box. The shaft spins within a turbine’s to meet energy demands. Excess energy may be stored generator and converts the mechanical energy into in off-grid applications for later use or passed on in grid- electrical energy. tie configurations for sale. Turbines that produce wind for smaller markets (20 watts to 100 kilowatts) consist of both horizontal and vertical axis wind turbines. There are several detailed differences between the two technologies, but in general the horizontal axis turbines face in the direction of the prevailing winds with a propeller blade-type air- foil. Vertical axis turbines are omni-directional and are capable of functioning in both steady and changing wind directions that are present closer to the ground. Small changes in wind speed can result in significant changes in the wind generating system performance.Historic windmill for grinding grain or pumping groundwater. Small wind turbines, also referred to as micro-turbines, may be building mounted. More commonly, however,Historically, wind flow or motion energy has been they are mounted on a pole or tower.utilized by man in several ways: sailing, fishing, using The blades of the turbine are specially designed to capture the wind’s kinetic d tooutstretched flags to communicate, or constructing wind Direct current (DC) electricity is generated by the turbinesmills to grind grain or pump water. Today we are able and may be utilized directly in specialized lighting or energy and convert it into mechanical energy by tu by turning a connected shaft directlyto take advantage of the old relationship between man motors. However, the electricity is typically processed or via a gear box.and his environment to harvest the motion or kinetic WIND ENERGY SITE CRITERIA through a device called an inverter, which converts theenergy of wind to supplement our needs for electrical DC electricity to alternating current (AC) electricity thatenergy. This article discusses considerations for “small Having a site usedis conducive and residences. is commonly that in buildings to capturing wind and OVERALL SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONSmarket” wind generation. converting it to energy is critical to the success of the wind generation system. Some things that should be considered: It is important to balance the system initial cost with long- The newest generation of a wind turbine harnessing the Preva Prevailing Wind term investment returns. Wind generation offers several power of nature to produce electricity. • Prepare an Area Wind Resource Assessment and advantages. Wind energy has a low environmental reference local area wind maps to determine if the impact compared to the burning of fossil fuels. The 20 ft site offers adequate w d power. ffers adequate wi s ad quate wind ad e source for wind generation is free. Lifetime maint nd gener time maintenance me m ntenance e maintenance ma • The American W d Energy A h A Wind Association recommends d costs are predictable while the price of fo sil fuels predictable, fos fossil fu l fossil f els that a site be a minimum of one acre before wind can be volatile. When wind power is combined with generation is considered. The site should offer other renewable energy sources, such as solar energy, sufficient area to safely operate a wind energy system it can provide a steady, long-term, reliable source of including the turbine, tower, and associated electrical electricity. 250 ft and mechanical systems. There are, however, challenges facing the development Avoiding site obstructions.* • Determine if there are local codes, zoning, or of wind turbines for smaller markets. The first of these association covenants which prohibit or regulate tall are financial challenges, since without initial public support structures or towers. financial incentives the development of wind power can WIND TURBINE • Identify any federal, state, and local utility incentive be cost prohibitive. Power production via wind turbines MAIN SERVICE PANEL programs that may be available to offset the initial is dependant upon unpredictable and variable forces system costs. of nature. Wind power which cannot be converted 25’ TOWER WIND POWER to a storable form, accessible on demand, limits its SYSTEM UTILITY • Th he The site should be clear of DISCONNECT METER SWITCH applications. Finally, communities are still resistant to ob obstructions. Turbines mounted the appearance and potential noise of wind generating o poles or towers should on towers and are concerned about the potential adverse DEDICATED WIND GROUND be located a minimum of TOWER BASE TOWER GROUND POWER SYSTEM METER SYSTEM impact on property values. SYSTEM OUT TO SERVICE 250 feet clear of building TRANSFORMER OR UTILITY GRID structures and large trees, BELOW GROUND CONDUIT The cost to conserve energy through improved and the turbine blades must Basic components of small-market wind generation system efficiencies is still more effective than to produce energy extend 20 feet above the infrastructure.* by a margin that ranges from 3 to 1 to 5 to 1. However, highest adjacent structure or as technologies continue to advance and system tr tree. efficiencies continue to improve, we are getting closer • For systems tied to the power to the time when it might be possible, through the use of grid, the site should offer proximity renewable electric generating systems, to achieve “net- to the utility where grid-tie is permitted. Determine zero” energy usage. if you are depending upon selling power back to the local utility to recover costs associated with the system *Source: Southwest Windpower, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona installation. GARY A. RAYMOND Member, SMPS Hammel, Green and Abrahamson, Inc. (HGA) is an integrated architecture, engineering and planning firm that helps prepare its clients for the future. With offices in Minneapolis and Rochester, Minnesota; Marke ng Specialist/Graphic Designer Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Sacramento, San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, the nationally recognized firm has developed expertise in healthcare, corporate, arts, community, higher education, and science/ technology industries since 1953. For information on this topic or other questions, please contact Yan Shagalov, PE, LEED AP at YShagalov@hga.com or visit us at www.hga.com 9 Franklin Avenue West, Unit 210 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55404 612.269.1622