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What is good design
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What is good design

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  • 1. What Is Good Design?And How Do You Do It? COM335
  • 2. Desktop Publishing Defined
  • 3. What is "good"?• It’s a matter of opinion.• What is “good” to one person, may not be “good” to another.• It depends on your specific objective and your target audience
  • 4. Step One: Relevance• Time Available: 1-7 Seconds ~ 4 words per second• What’s in it for me?• Headlines & Titles – Maximum 28 words – 9-5 is the best and should be twice the size of the subheads
  • 5. Step One: Relevance• Captions • People will read captions, no matter how long, before reading body text
  • 6. Step One: Relevance• Photographs – Inspire curiosity and involvement – Help readers imagine themselves there – Vary size, shape alignment, layering, isolation
  • 7. Step Two: Confirmation• Time Available: Up to 90 seconds• Was I right?• Looking for a reason NOT to read.
  • 8. Step Two: Confirmation• Short Body Text – Increase comprehension – Every 2-3 Paragraphs • Use Sub-heads, sidebars, pull quotes, summaries, teasers • Unfinished statements will get 30-60% more people to keep reading
  • 9. Headlines
  • 10. Layout
  • 11. Layout
  • 12. Step Two: Confirmation• Numbers & Outlines – Use bulleted lists – Call-outs – Quizes – get people involved (helps establish the need) – Table of Contents
  • 13. Step Two: Confirmation• Non-photographic Art – Charts – Graphs – Tables – Clip Art – Illustrations – Watermarks
  • 14. Step Two: Confirmation• Graphic Devices – Rules – Drop Caps – Dingbats – Bullets – Screens – Boxes (use sparingly to highlight items)
  • 15. Step Two: Confirmation• Decreased Readability – ALL CAPS – Underline – Italics – Color
  • 16. Graphic Devices• Pick two or three MAX Rules per publication and use consistently• Do not intersect Rules
  • 17. Graphic Devices• Drop and Initial Caps – Draw attention to the beginning of the body text – Use large initial letters to indicate the beginning of a chapter, articles or section of text
  • 18. Graphic Devices• Dingbats – Bullet Points – End-of-article markers to create a visual end-point – Highlight important copy – Can be custom
  • 19. Graphic Devices• Boxes and Bullet Points – Indicate “This is the primary point” – Relate to one another – Use boxes and bullets like an outline
  • 20. Step Three: Action• Time Available: As much as needed• What do I do?• Long body text – Break up for skimmers – Assume the general public has a 6th grade education – Break up with graphic devices
  • 21. Step Three: Action• Proof – Connects message and reader, creates memory• Call to action – Statistics – Track record – Testimonials – Issue a challenge – Visualization – Impact Statement
  • 22. Layout DesignSymmetrical Asymmetrical• Copy is centered and • Unusual shapes, white art is distributed evenly space and color achieve balance
  • 23. 6 Rules of Balance• Anything located in the upper left quadrant (primary optical area of the layout has more optical weight
  • 24. 6 Rules of Balance• Large items are noticed more, seen for a longer time, and remembered better than small items
  • 25. 6 Rules of Balance• Elements that are dark carry more optical weight than black and white
  • 26. 6 Rules of Balance• Color conveys more optical weight than black and white
  • 27. 6 Rules of Balance• White space serves to draw reader’s attention to whatever is in the “non-empty” space
  • 28. 6 Rules of Balance• Rectangles are “expected”• Triangles, ovals, circles, cubes convey optical weight