CCSS Annual 2012 Presentation

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  • Common core standards developed in 2009-2010 with NGA/CCSSO money with additional support from foundations.
  • An advisory group has provided advice and guidance to shape the initiative. Members of this group include experts from Achieve, Inc., ACT, the College Board, the National Association of State Boards of Education and the State Higher Education Executive Officers.
  • MN – adopted ELA only as of Jan 2012
  • CCSS must comprise at least 85% of the total state standardsWhile CCSS is not addressed in federal law there are some requirements that go along with CCSS adoption. This chart shows how those requirements compare to current provisions in NCLB.
  • Grandmother is from the MD 8th grade reading assessment –ShontoBegay is a contemporary Navajo poetTwo Roads is a sample from 8th grade reading Common Core
  • Grandmother is from the MD 8th grade reading assessmentTwo Roads is a sample from 8th grade reading Common Core
  • Grandmother is from the MD 8th grade reading assessmentTwo Roads is a sample from 8th grade reading Common Core
  • Grandmother is from the MD 8th grade reading assessmentTwo Roads is a sample from 8th grade reading Common Core
  • “Focused” – attempt to address the ‘mile wide, inch deep’ curriculumUnderstanding the math common core:“Students who have completed 7th grade and mastered the content and skills of the K-7 standardswill be well prepared for algebra in grade 8 or after.”Functions – describing situations where one quantity determines another, eg., return on investments
  • The CCSS authors show two possible ways to organize high school math curriculum aligned to the CCSS. U.S. sequence: two algebra courses and a geometry course,With data, probability and statistics added;Typical international sequence: three courses, each ofwhich includes number, algebra, geometry, probability and statistics;
  • State consortia to develop common ‘next generation’ assessments. Will address needs for: rapid feedback diagnostic
  • Feedback in at least two weeks
  • PARCC will be administered online but will not be computer adaptive, meaning items are selected based on responses in order to better measure the range of performance. For example, if an examinee performs well on an item of intermediate difficulty, he will then be presented with a more difficult question. Or, if he performed poorly, he would be presented with a simpler question. Helpful in measuring growth especially at the high and low ends. SMARTER high school will be at least at grade 11 and may include grades 9 and 10, too.
  • Comparable scores will enable states to compare student performance regardless of which assessment they administer. AI will reduce costs significantly by eliminating the need for human scorersSummative to be ready in 2014-15In January 2012, SMARTER & PARCC jointly awarded a contract to Pearson Foundation to develop a ‘technology readiness tool’
  • As of Jan 2012
  • As of January 2012 – KY is in both PARCC and SMARTER
  • Alaska, Nebraska, Texas & Virginia do not participate in any CCSS activities – Minnesota has adopted ELA only
  • Related to although not part of the CCSS, a collaboration of the above organizations and states are developing common standards for science. According to the collaboration website, the difference is that the development is driven more by the scientific and ed research communities. The standards are based on NRC’s framework for K-12 science education released July 2011. No plans for assessments at this point.
  • As of Nov 2011.
  • Federal grants
  • First challenge – is checking how well the standards align with current standardsA couple of recent studies attempted to measure current student performance against CCSS by crosswalking items on widely used tests to the CCSS. Qualify – these are imperfect analyses – for one thing, CCSS has not defined performance standards; also, we know there are gaps between CCSS content and current practices as we discussed, eg., we don’t test reading and writing proficiency in science.
  • ACT’s college-career ready benchmark is based on a 75% probability of earning a ‘C’ in the relevant credit-bearing freshman course. Please note that there are NO performance levels established for the CCSS, and so this is a very preliminary look. Nonetheless, it offers a glimpse at the potential alignment between CCSS and current practices.
  • 11th graders still have their senior year.
  • Brown Center at Brookings Institute, crosswalked NAEP released items with common core standards and reported 2009 8th grade performance on test items addressing concepts and topics that appear in the CCSS. The National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) is administered by US Department of Education and tests a representative sample of students in each state.
  • 2012 CEP survey – availability of computers cited as number one challenge followed closely by adequate internet access and bandwidth
  • Districts will need to provide resources to their staffs and students in order to implement CCSS
  • Center on Education Policy administered a second survey of state deputy superintendents of education in the fall of 2011. 42 states and DC responded. The states were not identified in the report.Rigor – 30 out of 32, ELA; 29 out of 32, math
  • Center on Education Policy survey state deputy superintendents of ed in the fall of last year. 42 states and DC responded.
  • How to read this chart: 36 states reported they will “changing their state assessments”; 6 states will change them by 2012 or earlier and 27 states will change them by 2013 or later. Note that 21 states are moving quickly to provide professional development.
  • CCSS is in its infancy but moving quickly. NSBA’s Center for Public Education is continuing to monitor and report progress on CCSS.
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Transcript

  • 1. Getting ready for the Common Core Patte BarthCenter for Public Education NSBA Annual Conference April 21, 2012
  • 2. Agenda • what are the CCSS? • what are the challenges? • how are states preparing? • what can districts do? • q&a
  • 3. The Common Core Standards are intended to be: • Aligned with college and work expectations • Focused and coherent • Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills • Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards • Internationally benchmarked so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy and society • Based on evidence and research • State led – coordinated by NGA Center and CCSSO 3SOURCE: Common Core State Standards, www.corestandards.org
  • 4. The Common Core Standards process:• CCSSO and NGA‟s Center for Best Practices• Advisory group: Achieve, Inc.; ACT, Inc.; College Board, NASBE, and SHEEO• Two rounds of public review• Final documents released June 2010• No federal dollars for development; foundation support
  • 5. 46 states & DC have adopted the CCSS adopted not adopted 5
  • 6. CCSS vs NCLB Common Core State Standards No Child Left BehindINFLEXIBLE on CONTENT FLEXIBLE on CONTENTstates must adopt 100% of CCSS K-12 states define their own standardsstandardsINFLEXIBLE on ASSESSMENT INFLEXIBLE on ASSESSMENTmust begin assessments on CCSS within must assess state standards yearly 3-8three years and once in high schoolFLEXIBLE on ACCOUNTABILITY INFLEXIBLE on ACCOUNTABILITYno requirements for public accountability numerous provisions
  • 7. NSBA & CCSS• supports NGA/CCSSO state-led process• supports federal funding for research and/or help to states for developing assessments• opposes federal mandates or coercion, eg. a condition for receiving Title 1 funds• opposes a national test
  • 8. What’s in the standards – English language arts Reading • Balance of literature and informational texts • Text complexity Writing • Emphasis on argument/informative • Writing about sources Speaking and Listening • Inclusion of formal and informal talk Language • Stress on general academic and domain-specific vocabularySOURCE: Common Core Standards, June 2010
  • 9. What’s different? English language arts Standards for reading and writing in history/ social studies, science, and technical subjects • Complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects Alignment with college and career readiness expectationsSOURCE: Common Core Standards, June 2010
  • 10. What’s different? The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear: Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same. And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. 10
  • 11. What’s different? Explain how the speaker in “Grandmother” feels about Grandmother Asdzan Alts‟ iisi. In your response, use details and examples from the poem to support your answer. Write your answer on your answer document. 11
  • 12. What’s different? The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stoodStudents analyze how the opening stanza of Robert And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth;Frost’s “The Road Not taken” structures the rhythmand meter for the poem and how the themes Then took the other, as just as fair,introduced by the speaker develop over the course of And having perhaps the better claim,the text. Because it was grassy and wanted wear: Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same. And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. 12
  • 13. What’s different?Explain how the speaker in “Grandmother” feelsabout Grandmother Asdzan Alts‟ iisi. In your Both assess readingresponse, use details and examples from the poem comprehensionto support your answer. Write your answer on yourStudentsdocument. the opening stanza of Robertanswer analyze howFrost’s “The Road Not taken” structures the rhythm Both ask students to useand meter for the poem and how the themes evidence from textintroduced by the speaker develop over the course ofthe text. 1st item focuses on reader response 2nd item asks for analysis, knowledge of poetic devices and theme 13
  • 14. What’s in the standards – Mathematics • Number & quantity • Algebra - algebraic thinking K-5 • Functions • Modeling - high school • Geometry • Statistics & probability • Emphasis on Mathematical practiceSOURCE: Common Core Standards, June 2010
  • 15. pre-calculus, calculus, advanced statistics, discrete math, advanced quantitative reasoning, specific technical POS Pathways through Algebra II Math III high school Geometry Math II mathematics Algebra I Math I Traditional sequence Integrated sequence • 2 algebra courses • 3 integrated courses • 1 geometry course • all include number, • DPS included algebra, geometry, DPS • 1 higher course • 1 higher courseSOURCE: Common Core Standards, Mathematics Appendix A, 2010
  • 16. What’s different? There are a total of y students in Mr. Smith’s classroom. Which of the following represents the number of students in the classroom when 3 students are absent? A. y+3 B. y-3 C. yx3 D. y÷3 16SOURCE: Virginia SOL released items, grade 5 math, 2010
  • 17. What’s different? Write an expression that records the calculations described below, but do not evaluate. Add 2 and 4 and multiply the sum by 3. Next, add 5 to that product and then double the result. 2(5+3)(2+4)) or (5+3(2+4))2 or 2(3(2+4)+5) or (3(2+4)+5)2 or 2((2+4)3+5) or ((2+4)3+5)2 or (5+3(2+4))+(5+3(2+4)) 17SOURCE: Illustrative mathematics, retrieved April 16, 2012
  • 18. What’s different?• Both assess translating words into number sentences• The first requires one step to solve the problem• The second requires several steps 18
  • 19. The Common Core State Standards 21st century assessments for CCSS
  • 20. State CCSS assessment consortia• formed to develop common “next generation” assessments aligned to the CCSS• supported by $346 million federal grants• PARCC: Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College & Careers headed by Achieve, Inc.• SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium headed by Washington state department of education 20
  • 21. What’s in common?• intended to assess higher order thinking at grades 3-8 and high school• measure growth and proficiency• computer-administered online to provide rapid feedback• both summative assessments for accountability, and formative assessments to monitor students‟ progress• aligned resources, ie., model lessons, diagnostic tools, professional development 21
  • 22. How do PARCC/SMARTER differ?• PARCC is computer-delivered; SMARTER will be “computer adaptive”• SMARTER is developing comprehensive high school assessment; PARCC is developing EOC high school assessments, including for two math pathways• SMARTER is budgeted to translate assessments into 5 languages, one of which will be Spanish 22
  • 23. Points of collaboration SMARTER & PARCC • working to ensure comparability of scores • developing protocols for Artificial Intelligent scoring • examining interoperable technology infrastructure • working toward same deadlines 23SOURCE: Center for K-12 Assessment & Performance Management at ETS, webinar April 4, 2011
  • 24. 24 states & DC are in the PARCC consortium participant non participant 24
  • 25. 28 states are in the SMARTER consortium participant non participant 25
  • 26. 46 states & DC are involved involved not involved 26
  • 27. Next Generation Science Standards• Collaboration of Achieve, NRC, AAAS, NSTA and 26 lead states• “Internationally benchmarked”• First draft to be released in 2012; 2 public reviews• Intended to be adopted „in whole‟• Carnegie Corp, Noyce Foundation & Dupont sponsors 27
  • 28. What will be in the standards Science • Practices: behaviors necessary to the work of scientists & engineers • Cross-cutting concepts: the „big ideas‟, eg., patterns, scale, cause & effect, etc. • Disciplinary core ideas: physical sciences; life sciences, earth & space sciences; and engineering, technology & applications. 28SOURCE: Next Generation Science Standards, www.nextgenscience.org
  • 29. 26 lead states – NextGeneration Science Standards participant non participant 29
  • 30. Other assessment consortia • Alternative assessments: $67 million to Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM) and National Center and State Collaboration (NCSC) – Assessments for students with “most significant cognitive impairments” • Assessments for ELL: $10.5 million to ASSETS, Assessment Services Supporting Els Through Technology Systems 30SOURCE: The K-12 Center at ETS, www.k12center.org
  • 31. The Common Core State Standards The challenges
  • 32. ACT’s ‘first look’ at the common core standards English language arts Percent of 2009 11th graders scoring at college-career ready benchmark 32SOURCE: ACT, Inc., A First Look at the Common Core and College and Career Readiness, December 2010
  • 33. ACT’s ‘first look’ Achievement gap - ELA Percent of 2009 11th graders scoring at college-career ready benchmark 33SOURCE: ACT, Inc., A First Look at the Common Core and College and Career Readiness, December 2010
  • 34. ACT’s ‘first look’ at the common core standaards – Mathematics Percent of 2009 11th graders scoring at college-career ready benchmarkSOURCE: ACT, Inc., A First Look at the Common Core and College and Career Readiness, December 2010
  • 35. NAEP performance v. common core standards – Mathematics Percent of 2009 8th graders answering NAEP/common core items correctlySOURCE: Brown Center on Education Policy, How well are American students learning? January, 2011
  • 36. Technology needs • 33 states offer some level of online testing • Most don‟t assess all students • Most are voluntary • Most are summative only • Most schools will need more computers & more bandwidth 36SOURCE: SETDA, Technology Requirements for Large Scale, Computer-Based & Online Assessment, June 2011
  • 37. District needs• Professional development for staff• Aligned assessments & curriculum• Aligned instructional materials• Supports for students 37
  • 38. The Common Core State Standards How states are preparing
  • 39. State survey • Most states say CCSS are more rigorous than their current standards • Most states say full implementation will take at least until 2013 or beyond • All are developing professional development materials & guides for districtsSOURCE: Year 2 of implementing common core state standards: States‟ progress and challenges, Center on Education Policy, January 2012
  • 40. State survey (con’t) • Most states have established partnerships between state education agency and higher ed • Half are aligning undergraduate admissions policies with CCSSSOURCE: Year 2 of implementing common core state standards: States‟ progress and challenges, Center on Education Policy, January 2012
  • 41. State timelines for implementation # of states making 2012 or 2013 Change related to CCSS change earlier or later Changing state assessments 36 6 27 Requiring districts to implement CCSS 31 7 23 Creating/revising evaluation systems to hold 30 9 19 educators accountable for students‟ CCSS mastery Changing curriculum guides or materials 33 14 18 Adopting special initiatives to ensure CCSS are fully 25 11 11 implemented in state‟s lowest performing schools Revising educator certification policies and 18 5 10 requirements to align with CCSS Changing professional development programs 33 21 9SOURCE: States‟ progress and challenges in implementing common corestate standards, Center on Education Policy, January 2011
  • 42. School district challenges • Almost 3/5 of districts in CCSS states view CCSS as more rigorous • 2/3 are developing plans and timelines • 3/4 view adequate funding as a major challenge • 2/3 say they are getting inadequate guidance from state • Few see teacher/principal resistance as a major challenge although 3/5 see it as a minor oneSOURCE: Common Core State Standards: Progress and Challenges in School Districts‟ Implementation,Center on Education Policy, September 2011
  • 43. What the public thinks • 2/3 of voters say it‟s better for all states to have the same standards and tests • 3/5 have heard „nothing‟ about the CCSS • Of those who have heard of CCSS, 1/3 are favorable and 1/3 are unfavorable • 3/5 of teachers have a favorable opinionSOURCE: Achieve, Inc., Strong Support, Low Awareness, October 2011
  • 44. Don’t wait for the state• Get involved with what’s happening at your SEA• Set aside time for school board to review CCSS and their implications• Form teacher/administrator/parent study groups to analyze CCSS against current practices 44
  • 45. Don’t wait for the state• Partner with local colleges & universities – Professional development – Curriculum alignment – Information sharing – Share placement tests• Survey local businesses• Reach out to the community 45
  • 46. Watch this spacewww.centerforpubliceducation.org or contact Patte Barth, pbarth@nsba.org
  • 47. Resources & tools Center for Public Education  Objective, easy to understand research  Up to date analysis  School success stories  www.centerforpubliceducation.org Data First  Data Center with national & state data  Learning Center with downloadable videos  Ask the expert  www.data-first.org