Data First Introduction

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  • CPE reviewed current school board research and identified the common characteristics of effective school boards.Refer participants to hand out
  • What are some questions related to your baseline.
  • National and at least state level data found in the Data Center. Clearly, not a comprehensive list. Where do we need to focus? What are our priorities?
  • What are some questions related to resource alignment?
  • Other questions to ask locally – textbooks & instructional materials? Time for instruction, professional collaboration? Guidance counselors and other support staff? Are we putting our money where our priorities are?
  • What are some questions related to programs & practices?
  • We don’t have a lot of comparable national data on programs, including how many districts have SIS and/or LMS in place for monitoring progress. Part of your work as boards is to make sure such systems are in place as well as policies regarding their use.
  • Do our programs deliver on our goals? The biggest levers a school district has for improving student outcomes are rigorous curriculum and instruction; and teacher quality. School boards also need to provide the system supports for the levers to work.
  • What are some questions related to student outcomes?
  • Other: GPA, AP/IB scores, retention rates, late grads, discipline/attendance.Are our children learning and succeeding?
  • Referto the data decision-making cycle to make your case.
  • Comparison of the “high needs/persistently low performing” school to the school district average and to the “low needs/high performing” school.
  • High needs school – school district average – low needs school
  • Remember .. Impact is measured by better student outcomes.
  • Data First Introduction

    1. 1. The data made me do it! Using data for continuous school improvement An over view of Data First for school leaders
    2. 2. 8 traits of effective school boards 1. Commit to a vision of high expectations for students 2. Share beliefs about students’ abilities to learn 3. Are accountability driven, and focused on student outcomes 4. Have a collaborative relationship with staff and community 5. Are data savvy 6. Align and sustain resources to district goals 7. Lead as a united team with superintendent 8. Take part in team development and trainingSOURCE: Center for Public Education, 2011 2
    3. 3. The Key Work governance framework Data informs board actions aimed at improving student achievementNational School Boards Association, www.nsba.org 3
    4. 4. Answer some questions about thedata contained in this chart Reading Math Science Social StudiesSchool A 70 68 51 62School B 75 65 50 85School C 68 68 45 45School D 64 70 55 66School E 86 81 70 75School F 72 65 58 60School G 55 60 30 40 4
    5. 5. How did we do overall?Your Which schools were strong?Turn Which schools were weak? Which content area was strong? Which content area was weak? 5
    6. 6. First question: What is the target? Reading Math Science Social StudiesSchool A 70 68 51 62School B 75 65 50 85School C 68 68 45 45School D 64 70 55 66School E 86 81 70 75School F 72 65 58 60School G 55 60 30 40 6
    7. 7. Let’s make color work for us Made the target Missed the target 7
    8. 8. Which school made a target of 70?How did we do overall? Reading Math Science Social StudiesSchool A 70 68 51 62School B 75 65 50 85School C 68 68 45 45School D 64 70 55 66School E 86 81 70 75School F 72 65 58 60School G 55 60 30 40 8
    9. 9. What if the targets are different foreach content area? Reading 70 Mathematics 60 Science 40 Social Studies 50 Remember AYP (Adequate Yearly Progress) targets are often set separately for each content area 9
    10. 10. Targets: Reading – 70 Math - 60 Science – 40 Social Studies - 50 Reading Math Science Social StudiesSchool A 70 68 51 62School B 75 65 50 85School C 68 68 45 45School D 64 70 55 66School E 86 81 70 75School F 72 65 58 60School G 55 60 30 40 10
    11. 11. Targets: Reading – 70 Math - 60 Science – 40 Social Studies - 50 Reading Math Science Social StudiesSchool A 70 68 51 62School B 75 65 50 85School C 68 68 45 45School D 64 70 55 66School E 86 81 70 75School F 72 65 58 60School G 55 60 30 40 11
    12. 12. How does it work? Color Coding x 12
    13. 13. Targets: Reading – 70 Math - 60 Science – 40 Social Studies - 50 Reading Math Science Social StudiesSchool A 70 68 51 62School B 75 65 50 85School C 68 68 45 45School D 64 70 55 66School E 86 81 70 75School F 72 65 58 60School G 55 60 30 40 13
    14. 14. Data DecisionMaking Cycle Resource Baseline Alignment Programs Student and Outcomes Practices 14
    15. 15. Student outcomes by themselves are a reportingsystem – not a data-driven decision making cycle. Resource Baseline Alignment Programs Student and Outcomes Practices 15
    16. 16. Decision making starts with where you are now.Last year’s outcomes become this year’s baseline. Resource Baseline Alignment Programs Student Outcomes and Practices 16
    17. 17. Choices made between baseline and outcomesare the heart of leadership. Resource Baseline Alignment Opportunity to Student Programs Learn Outcomes and Practices 17
    18. 18. Our bottom line is student achievement. Thesedata define our success. Resource Baseline Alignment Programs Student Outcomes and Practices 18
    19. 19. Data first – act – monitor – repeat • Enrollment • Funding • Environment • Staffing • Student • Facilities Continuous Improvement outcomes Resource BaselineAccountability Alignment Programs Student and Outcomes Practices • Test scores • Curriculum • Graduation • Monitoring • Postsecondary • Supports 19
    20. 20. What questions could “baseline” dataanswer? • Enrollment • Funding • Environment • Staffing • Performance • Facilities Your Resource Baseline Alignment Turn Student Programs and Outcomes Practices • Test scores • Curriculum • Graduation • Monitoring • Postsecondary • Supports 20
    21. 21. Get your baselineEnrollment• How many students attend our schools?• What is the racial/ethnic make up? poverty level?• How many students have disabilities? are ELL?Environment• How large are our schools?• Is student discipline an issue? student attendance?Performance• How do our students score on state tests?• Are they graduating from high school? ready for college and workplace? 21
    22. 22. What questions could “resource” dataanswer? • Enrollment • Funding • Environment • Staffing • Performance • Facilities Your Resource Baseline Alignment Turn Student Programs and Outcomes Practices • Test scores • Curriculum • Graduation • Monitoring • Postsecondary • Supports 22
    23. 23. Align your resourcesFunding• What are our school district’s expenditures?• Is our school funding equitable?• How much of our funds are federal, state and local?Staffing• Are our teachers knowledgeable in the subject they teach?• How many teachers meet HQT? Which students do they teach?Facilities• What is our average class size?• Are classrooms & facilities up to date? 23
    24. 24. What questions could “programs &practices” answer? • Enrollment • Funding • Environment • Staffing • Performance • Facilities Your Resource Baseline Alignment Turn Student Programs and Outcomes Practices • Test scores • Curriculum • Graduation • Monitoring • Postsecondary • Supports 24
    25. 25. Examine programs & practicesCurriculum• Do our students have access to rigorous high school courses?• What courses are required for graduation?Supports• What percent of our students are enrolled in in prekindergarten?• Do our students have access to technology?Monitoring• How is student progress monitored individually, by subgroup, by classroom and by school?• How do we know if our programs are working? 25
    26. 26. Instructional Programs and Practices Equal Opportunity to Learn Rigorous curriculum and research-based practices Teacher Quality Continuous Instructional Collaboration and feedback interventions Building Capacity 26
    27. 27. What questions could “studentoutcomes” answer? • Enrollment • Funding • Environment • Staffing • Performance • Facilities Your Resource Baseline Alignment Turn Student Programs and Outcomes Practices • Test scores • Curriculum • Graduation • Monitoring • Postsecondary • Supports 27
    28. 28. Assess outcomesTest scores• Are our students meeting state proficiency standards?• Are our schools making AYP?• Are our students ready for college as measured by SAT, ACT?Graduation• Are students graduating on time with a standard diploma?Postsecondary• Are our students enrolling in college?• Are our students successful in postsecondary careers, training and education? 28
    29. 29. What would a data-driven board do? Your district has a persistently low-achieving school. Your superintendent has data showing this school also has high teacher turnover and a high proportion of new teachers. She wants the board to approve an incentive plan to lure the district’s best teachers to this school. Parents in high-achieving schools protest. 29
    30. 30. The decision-making cycleTeacher quality and student achievement • Enrollment • Qualifications • Student • Distribution Continuous Improvement outcomes • Equity Accountability Baseline Resource Alignment Programs Student and Outcomes Practices • State Tests • Monitoring • Local • Working Measures Conditions • HR Policies 30
    31. 31. What would a data-driven board do?• Identify your need• Examine your teacher distribution data• Look at best practices in teacher recruitment & retention• Involve your teachers, engage your community 31
    32. 32. Student performance 100% Advanced Proficient Basic Below Basic 0% high needs district ave low needs 32
    33. 33. What would a data-driven board do?• Identify your need• Examine your teacher distribution data• Look at best practices in teacher recruitment & retention• Involve your teachers, engage your community 33
    34. 34. Assignment by teacher experience 100% >4 years 2-4 years 1 year 0% High Needs District Ave Low Needs 34
    35. 35. What would a data-driven board do?• Identify your need• Examine your teacher distribution data• Look at best practices in teacher recruitment & retention• Involve your teachers, engage your community 35
    36. 36. Recruitment & retention • Improve working conditions, eg., supportive leadership, strong induction programs for new teachers • Provide effective professional development • Use targeted financial incentives such as housing assistance to attract highly-qualified teachers.SOURCE: Center for Public Education, 2012 36
    37. 37. What would a data-driven board do?• Identify your need• Examine your teacher distribution data• Look at best practices in teacher recruitment & retention• Involve your teachers, engage your community 37
    38. 38. Determining Return on Investment(ROI) of particular policies andprograms informs better decisions andhelps school leaders explainpotentially unpopular decisions to thecommunity.here’s how it works … 38
    39. 39. Implementation score –Degree of Difficulty and Cost1. High cost or great difficulty to implement2. Significant cost or difficulty to implement3. Moderate cost or difficulty to implement4. Little or no cost or difficulty to implement 39
    40. 40. Results score –Degree of Impact or Change1. Very little or no impact or opportunity for change2. Some impact or opportunity for change3. Strong impact or opportunity for change4. Greatest impact or opportunity for change 40
    41. 41. High Impact 4 3 2 Low 1 Impact 1 2 3 4 Difficult/High Cost Easy/Low CostKey Work of School Boards, 2009© Katheryn Gemberling 41
    42. 42. B U I L D I N G T H E F O U N D AT I O N High Impact 4 Retain but Retain simplify or as is reduce cost 3 2 Eliminate Redesign or remove Low 1 Impact 1 2 3 4 Difficult/High Cost Easy/Low Cost Implementation ImplementationKey Work of School Boards, 2009© Katheryn Gemberling 42
    43. 43. The datamade me doit! 43

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