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Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
 

Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach

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    Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach Presentation Transcript

    • RE-THINKING READERS’ ADVISORYAn Interactive Approach Rebecca Howard, MLIS Laura Raphael, M.A.
    • WHO WE ARE  Tulsa City-County Library  Librarians each with 10+years of public library experience  READERS! Rebecca Howard Laura Raphael
    • WHICH STATEMENT BEST DESCRIBES WHAT YOU HOPE TO GAIN FROM TODAY’S WEBINAR? I want to know exactly what form-based R.A. is and what it entails. I want to know how to propose and implement a form- based R.A. program at my library. I want to learn how other libraries are doing form- based R.A. and adapt for my library. I want to learn about R.A. resources that will help me with our existing form-based service.
    • YOUR NEXT GREAT READ  Form-based Readers’ Advisory service  Launched in March 2011, but process started much earlier  Served around 1,000+ area readers by providing personalized reading guides
    • HOW… WHAT… WHEN… WHO…  Readers’ Advisory Today  Objective: Describe the challenges and potential shortfalls of current R.A. services.  What is “Form-based Readers’ Advisory”?  Objective: List the benefits of form-based Readers’ Advisory.  Making the Case  Objective: Understand the basic process of proposing this service to your library leaders.  The form of The Form  Recognize the elements of an effective readers’ form.  A “League of Extraordinary Librarians” of Your Own  Describe the competencies of an effective team member.
    • HOW… WHAT… WHEN… WHO… /CON/  The Finished Product – A Personalized Reading Guide  Identify the important elements of a personalized reading guide.  Identify available resources to assist in the development of a personalized reading guide.
    • READERS’ ADVISORY TODAY  Objective: Describe the challenges and potential shortfalls of current R.A. services.
    • POLL: TELL US WHAT YOU’RE DOING NOW.  What types of Readers’ Advisory methods do you currently use? Check all that apply.  Interviews (face-to-face interactions)  Virtual (email, chat)  Displays  Programming (book discussions, book talks)  Print media (printed book lists, reviews, posters, etc...)  Social media, blogs  Form-based
    • THE CONVERSATION
    • THE CONVERSATION Reading Addict Blog Slightly skewed book thoughts by seriously dedicated librarians Example list created in Bibliocommons If a Readers’ Advisory Librarian suggests titles in a forest and there is no one to hear …
    • CONVERSATION KILLERS o Specific o Universal
    • CONVERSATION KILLERS  Nature of browsing  Online searching  Self-service Photo used with Creative Commons License: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ozyman/
    • CONVERSATION KILLERS  Wait, I can ask you that?  Library staff approached may not be the best person for the job.  Public service desk may not be the best place for R.A. interactions
    • PUBLIC LIBRARY IDEAL . . . Meets public library reality. http://librarianheygirl.tumblr.com/ Photo used with Creative Commons License: http://www.flickr.com/photos/suratlozowick/4544884797/sizes/m/in/ photostream/
    • WHAT IS FORM-BASED READERS’ ADVISORY?  Objective: List the benefits of form-based Readers’ Advisory.
    • FORM-BASED READERS’ ADVISORY
    • Form-based Readers’ Advisory Readers’ Advisory interview Reference interview
    • REFERENCE INTERVIEW  Information Need  Fulfillment
    • READERS ADVISORY INTERVIEW  Personal reading appeals  Possibilities
    • REFERENCE INTERVIEW  Exact, defining the question, business-like READERS ADVISORY INTERVIEW  General, casual, probing for appeals, emotional
    • THE TRADITIONAL RA INTERVIEW
    • READER ASKS QUESTION… Brain goes empty.
    • BENEFITS FOR READERS Allows reader time and space to reflect on what they like and what they want to read next. More likely to result in books & authors they will enjoy.
    • BENEFITS FOR LIBRARIANS Allows librarian time and space to find authors & titles Increases Readers’ Advisory knowledge
    • OTHER BENEFITS  Creates bond between best librarian & reader  Deepens the conversation  Results in a valuable product
    • THE BIGGEST BENEFIT OF ALL  Makes librarians happy!
    • POLL  For your situation, what do you think might be the biggest benefit of form-based Readers’ Advisory?  A. Gives readers time to ponder their reading tastes.  B. Allows librarians to carefully consider a reader’s preferences & reduces “reader asks question… brain goes empty” phenomenon.  C. Deepens the Readers’ Advisory conversation.  D. Results in a valuable “product” from interaction.  E. Engages librarians in rewarding professional activity.
    • MAKING THE CASE  Objective: Understand the basic process of proposing this service to your library leaders.
    • POLL In the last five years have you seen an increase, a decrease, or no change in your library’s budget allocation to readers’ services?
    • WE HEART READERS (and you should, too)!  They love the library.  They use the library.  They support the library. Mrs. Duffee Seated on a Striped Sofa, Reading her Kindle. After Mary Cassatt. Via a Creative Commons License.
    • NOW WHAT?  Think like a grant writer.  Elements of a strong proposal:  Statement of Need  Project Description  Resources Required  Scope of Work  Timeline for implementation  Evaluation
    • THE FORM OF THE FORM  Recognize the elements of an effective readers’ form (also called survey, or profile).
    • LONGER OR SHORTER?
    • Vs.
    • POLL:  What length of form do you think might work better for readers at your library?  A. Long – several in-depth sections, like Williamsburg  B. Short – one or two questions, like Seattle  C. Neither/don’t know
    • SHORT-ANSWER OR CIRCLE/SLASH/SELECT?
    • THE BOTTOM LINE…  The best form is the one that will help you create the most comprehensive reading guides
    • ELEMENTS OF AN EFFECTIVE FORM:  Easily accessible to both reader & library  Takes thought to complete  Many different “buckets” for information  Conversational  FLEXIBILE
    • SPECIFIC QUESTIONS?
    • TOP 3 PARTS NEEDED:  Favorites books and authors (with explanation, if possible)  Main focus or appeal (characters, setting, language, etc.)  Preferred genres
    • NEXT 3 PARTS (NICE TO HAVE):  Current reading mood  Verbotens  Books and authors they did not like
    • QUESTIONS?
    • BUILDING YOUR TEAM  Describe the competencies of an effective team member.
    • Reads voraciously
    • Likes people
    • Has time & desire to learn more about RA
    • Reads voraciously Likes people Has time & desire to learn more about RA
    • QUICK RESPONSE:  What are 3 words or phrases you would use to describe a good Readers’ Advisor?
    • A GOOD READERS’ ADVISOR…  Smart  Curious  Good listener  Identifies as “reader”  Is open to reading outside comfort zone  Has writing skills  Nonjudgmental – validates readers’ preferences  Passionate about connecting people to books: a belief in the intrinsic value of reading for reading’s sake!  Interpersonal skills
    • http://leagueofextraordinarylibrarians.weebly.com
    • EXTRAORDINARY READERS’ ADVISORS…  Know what they know  Know their stuff  Have a routine  Connect with readers
    • THE BEST TRAINING…  On the job 
    • THE FINISHED PRODUCT  Identify the important elements of a personalized reading guide.  Identify available resources to assist in the development of a personalized reading guide.
    • ELEMENTS OF A READING GUIDE o Pace yourself.
    • KEY COMPONENTS  Appeals
    • Personalized Reading Suggestions for Mitzi Thomas Appeal Factors I selected authors and books based upon the following subject interests and appeal factors: I focused on your request for happy, uplifting books that are sometimes humorous with a sentimental or emotional style. I also chose books that are character driven, have a strong sense of place, and may expose you to new people, places and subjects. I selected both fiction and narrative nonfiction. Please note that some of these books are available in e-book format at the library and all are available in print. Check our “Audio and e-book downloads” page for availability.
    • KEY COMPONENTS  Authors  Titles  Reason for selection
    • THE ICING  Branding  Hyperlinks to catalog  Cross marketing
    • RESOURCES TO USE IN CREATING A GUIDE  NoveList  Early Word (www.earlyword.com)  BookList  Shelf Awareness  Bibliocommons lists  Popular magazines:  People  Entertainment Weekly  O (Oprah)  Real Simple  Ladies Home Journal  Your brain  Other library staff
    • WANT MORE? We’ll be offering a six-week eCourse beginning November 4. Some highlights: 1) Draft your own proposal 2) Create your own reader profile 3) Learn how other libraries are doing form-based R.A. 4) Create a personalized reading guide for a classmate and receive your own, too!
    • QUESTIONS?