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RE-THINKING
READERS’ ADVISORYAn Interactive Approach
Rebecca Howard, MLIS
Laura Raphael, M.A.
WHO WE ARE
 Tulsa City-County Library
 Librarians each with 10+years of public library
experience
 READERS!
Rebecca How...
WHICH STATEMENT BEST DESCRIBES WHAT YOU
HOPE TO GAIN FROM TODAY’S WEBINAR?
I want to know exactly what form-based R.A. is ...
YOUR NEXT GREAT READ
 Form-based Readers’ Advisory service
 Launched in March 2011, but process started much
earlier
 S...
HOW… WHAT… WHEN… WHO…
 Readers’ Advisory Today
 Objective: Describe the challenges and potential shortfalls of
current R...
HOW… WHAT… WHEN… WHO… /CON/
 The Finished Product – A Personalized Reading
Guide
 Identify the important elements of a p...
READERS’ ADVISORY TODAY
 Objective: Describe the challenges and potential
shortfalls of current R.A. services.
POLL: TELL US WHAT YOU’RE DOING NOW.
 What types of Readers’ Advisory methods do
you currently use? Check all that apply....
THE CONVERSATION
THE CONVERSATION
Reading Addict Blog
Slightly skewed book thoughts by
seriously dedicated librarians
Example list created ...
CONVERSATION KILLERS
o Specific
o Universal
CONVERSATION KILLERS
 Nature of browsing
 Online searching
 Self-service
Photo used with Creative Commons
License: http...
CONVERSATION KILLERS
 Wait, I can ask you that?
 Library staff approached may not be the best
person for the job.
 Publ...
PUBLIC LIBRARY IDEAL . . .
Meets public library reality.
http://librarianheygirl.tumblr.com/
Photo used with Creative Comm...
WHAT IS FORM-BASED READERS’ ADVISORY?
 Objective: List the benefits of form-based Readers’
Advisory.
FORM-BASED READERS’ ADVISORY
Form-based Readers’ Advisory
Readers’ Advisory interview
Reference interview
REFERENCE INTERVIEW
 Information Need  Fulfillment
READERS ADVISORY INTERVIEW
 Personal reading appeals  Possibilities
REFERENCE INTERVIEW
 Exact, defining the question, business-like
READERS ADVISORY INTERVIEW
 General, casual, probing fo...
THE TRADITIONAL RA INTERVIEW
READER ASKS QUESTION…
Brain goes empty.
BENEFITS FOR READERS
Allows reader time and space to reflect on what
they like and what they want to read next.
More likel...
BENEFITS FOR LIBRARIANS
Allows librarian time and space to find
authors & titles
Increases Readers’ Advisory knowledge
OTHER BENEFITS
 Creates bond between best librarian & reader
 Deepens the conversation
 Results in a valuable product
THE BIGGEST BENEFIT OF ALL
 Makes librarians happy!
POLL
 For your situation, what do you think might be the
biggest benefit of form-based Readers’ Advisory?
 A. Gives read...
MAKING THE CASE
 Objective: Understand the basic process of proposing this
service to your library leaders.
POLL
In the last five years have you seen an
increase,
a decrease, or
no change in your library’s
budget allocation to rea...
WE HEART READERS
(and you should, too)!
 They love the library.
 They use the library.
 They support the library.
Mrs. ...
NOW WHAT?
 Think like a grant writer.
 Elements of a strong proposal:
 Statement of Need
 Project Description
 Resour...
THE FORM OF THE FORM
 Recognize the elements of an effective readers’ form (also
called survey, or profile).
LONGER OR SHORTER?
Vs.
POLL:
 What length of form do you think might work better
for readers at your library?
 A. Long – several in-depth secti...
SHORT-ANSWER OR CIRCLE/SLASH/SELECT?
THE BOTTOM LINE…
 The best form is the one that will help you create
the most comprehensive reading guides
ELEMENTS OF AN EFFECTIVE FORM:
 Easily accessible to both reader & library
 Takes thought to complete
 Many different “...
SPECIFIC QUESTIONS?
TOP 3 PARTS NEEDED:
 Favorites books and authors (with explanation, if
possible)
 Main focus or appeal (characters, sett...
NEXT 3 PARTS (NICE TO HAVE):
 Current reading mood
 Verbotens
 Books and authors they did not like
QUESTIONS?
BUILDING YOUR TEAM
 Describe the competencies of an effective team member.
Reads
voraciously
Likes
people
Has time &
desire to
learn more
about RA
Reads
voraciously
Likes
people
Has time &
desire to
learn more
about RA
QUICK RESPONSE:
 What are 3 words or phrases you would use to
describe a good Readers’ Advisor?
A GOOD READERS’ ADVISOR…
 Smart
 Curious
 Good listener
 Identifies as “reader”
 Is open to reading outside comfort z...
http://leagueofextraordinarylibrarians.weebly.com
EXTRAORDINARY READERS’ ADVISORS…
 Know what they know
 Know their stuff
 Have a routine
 Connect with readers
THE BEST TRAINING…
 On the job 
THE FINISHED PRODUCT
 Identify the important elements of a personalized
reading guide.
 Identify available resources to ...
ELEMENTS OF A READING GUIDE
o Pace yourself.
KEY COMPONENTS
 Appeals
Personalized Reading Suggestions
for Mitzi Thomas
Appeal Factors
I selected authors and books based upon the following sub...
KEY COMPONENTS
 Authors
 Titles
 Reason for selection
THE ICING
 Branding
 Hyperlinks to catalog
 Cross marketing
RESOURCES TO USE IN CREATING A GUIDE
 NoveList
 Early Word (www.earlyword.com)
 BookList
 Shelf Awareness
 Bibliocomm...
WANT MORE?
We’ll be offering a six-week eCourse beginning
November 4. Some highlights:
1) Draft your own proposal
2) Creat...
QUESTIONS?
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach
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Transcript of "Rethinking Readers Advisory: An Interactive Approach"

  1. 1. RE-THINKING READERS’ ADVISORYAn Interactive Approach Rebecca Howard, MLIS Laura Raphael, M.A.
  2. 2. WHO WE ARE  Tulsa City-County Library  Librarians each with 10+years of public library experience  READERS! Rebecca Howard Laura Raphael
  3. 3. WHICH STATEMENT BEST DESCRIBES WHAT YOU HOPE TO GAIN FROM TODAY’S WEBINAR? I want to know exactly what form-based R.A. is and what it entails. I want to know how to propose and implement a form- based R.A. program at my library. I want to learn how other libraries are doing form- based R.A. and adapt for my library. I want to learn about R.A. resources that will help me with our existing form-based service.
  4. 4. YOUR NEXT GREAT READ  Form-based Readers’ Advisory service  Launched in March 2011, but process started much earlier  Served around 1,000+ area readers by providing personalized reading guides
  5. 5. HOW… WHAT… WHEN… WHO…  Readers’ Advisory Today  Objective: Describe the challenges and potential shortfalls of current R.A. services.  What is “Form-based Readers’ Advisory”?  Objective: List the benefits of form-based Readers’ Advisory.  Making the Case  Objective: Understand the basic process of proposing this service to your library leaders.  The form of The Form  Recognize the elements of an effective readers’ form.  A “League of Extraordinary Librarians” of Your Own  Describe the competencies of an effective team member.
  6. 6. HOW… WHAT… WHEN… WHO… /CON/  The Finished Product – A Personalized Reading Guide  Identify the important elements of a personalized reading guide.  Identify available resources to assist in the development of a personalized reading guide.
  7. 7. READERS’ ADVISORY TODAY  Objective: Describe the challenges and potential shortfalls of current R.A. services.
  8. 8. POLL: TELL US WHAT YOU’RE DOING NOW.  What types of Readers’ Advisory methods do you currently use? Check all that apply.  Interviews (face-to-face interactions)  Virtual (email, chat)  Displays  Programming (book discussions, book talks)  Print media (printed book lists, reviews, posters, etc...)  Social media, blogs  Form-based
  9. 9. THE CONVERSATION
  10. 10. THE CONVERSATION Reading Addict Blog Slightly skewed book thoughts by seriously dedicated librarians Example list created in Bibliocommons If a Readers’ Advisory Librarian suggests titles in a forest and there is no one to hear …
  11. 11. CONVERSATION KILLERS o Specific o Universal
  12. 12. CONVERSATION KILLERS  Nature of browsing  Online searching  Self-service Photo used with Creative Commons License: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ozyman/
  13. 13. CONVERSATION KILLERS  Wait, I can ask you that?  Library staff approached may not be the best person for the job.  Public service desk may not be the best place for R.A. interactions
  14. 14. PUBLIC LIBRARY IDEAL . . . Meets public library reality. http://librarianheygirl.tumblr.com/ Photo used with Creative Commons License: http://www.flickr.com/photos/suratlozowick/4544884797/sizes/m/in/ photostream/
  15. 15. WHAT IS FORM-BASED READERS’ ADVISORY?  Objective: List the benefits of form-based Readers’ Advisory.
  16. 16. FORM-BASED READERS’ ADVISORY
  17. 17. Form-based Readers’ Advisory Readers’ Advisory interview Reference interview
  18. 18. REFERENCE INTERVIEW  Information Need  Fulfillment
  19. 19. READERS ADVISORY INTERVIEW  Personal reading appeals  Possibilities
  20. 20. REFERENCE INTERVIEW  Exact, defining the question, business-like READERS ADVISORY INTERVIEW  General, casual, probing for appeals, emotional
  21. 21. THE TRADITIONAL RA INTERVIEW
  22. 22. READER ASKS QUESTION… Brain goes empty.
  23. 23. BENEFITS FOR READERS Allows reader time and space to reflect on what they like and what they want to read next. More likely to result in books & authors they will enjoy.
  24. 24. BENEFITS FOR LIBRARIANS Allows librarian time and space to find authors & titles Increases Readers’ Advisory knowledge
  25. 25. OTHER BENEFITS  Creates bond between best librarian & reader  Deepens the conversation  Results in a valuable product
  26. 26. THE BIGGEST BENEFIT OF ALL  Makes librarians happy!
  27. 27. POLL  For your situation, what do you think might be the biggest benefit of form-based Readers’ Advisory?  A. Gives readers time to ponder their reading tastes.  B. Allows librarians to carefully consider a reader’s preferences & reduces “reader asks question… brain goes empty” phenomenon.  C. Deepens the Readers’ Advisory conversation.  D. Results in a valuable “product” from interaction.  E. Engages librarians in rewarding professional activity.
  28. 28. MAKING THE CASE  Objective: Understand the basic process of proposing this service to your library leaders.
  29. 29. POLL In the last five years have you seen an increase, a decrease, or no change in your library’s budget allocation to readers’ services?
  30. 30. WE HEART READERS (and you should, too)!  They love the library.  They use the library.  They support the library. Mrs. Duffee Seated on a Striped Sofa, Reading her Kindle. After Mary Cassatt. Via a Creative Commons License.
  31. 31. NOW WHAT?  Think like a grant writer.  Elements of a strong proposal:  Statement of Need  Project Description  Resources Required  Scope of Work  Timeline for implementation  Evaluation
  32. 32. THE FORM OF THE FORM  Recognize the elements of an effective readers’ form (also called survey, or profile).
  33. 33. LONGER OR SHORTER?
  34. 34. Vs.
  35. 35. POLL:  What length of form do you think might work better for readers at your library?  A. Long – several in-depth sections, like Williamsburg  B. Short – one or two questions, like Seattle  C. Neither/don’t know
  36. 36. SHORT-ANSWER OR CIRCLE/SLASH/SELECT?
  37. 37. THE BOTTOM LINE…  The best form is the one that will help you create the most comprehensive reading guides
  38. 38. ELEMENTS OF AN EFFECTIVE FORM:  Easily accessible to both reader & library  Takes thought to complete  Many different “buckets” for information  Conversational  FLEXIBILE
  39. 39. SPECIFIC QUESTIONS?
  40. 40. TOP 3 PARTS NEEDED:  Favorites books and authors (with explanation, if possible)  Main focus or appeal (characters, setting, language, etc.)  Preferred genres
  41. 41. NEXT 3 PARTS (NICE TO HAVE):  Current reading mood  Verbotens  Books and authors they did not like
  42. 42. QUESTIONS?
  43. 43. BUILDING YOUR TEAM  Describe the competencies of an effective team member.
  44. 44. Reads voraciously
  45. 45. Likes people
  46. 46. Has time & desire to learn more about RA
  47. 47. Reads voraciously Likes people Has time & desire to learn more about RA
  48. 48. QUICK RESPONSE:  What are 3 words or phrases you would use to describe a good Readers’ Advisor?
  49. 49. A GOOD READERS’ ADVISOR…  Smart  Curious  Good listener  Identifies as “reader”  Is open to reading outside comfort zone  Has writing skills  Nonjudgmental – validates readers’ preferences  Passionate about connecting people to books: a belief in the intrinsic value of reading for reading’s sake!  Interpersonal skills
  50. 50. http://leagueofextraordinarylibrarians.weebly.com
  51. 51. EXTRAORDINARY READERS’ ADVISORS…  Know what they know  Know their stuff  Have a routine  Connect with readers
  52. 52. THE BEST TRAINING…  On the job 
  53. 53. THE FINISHED PRODUCT  Identify the important elements of a personalized reading guide.  Identify available resources to assist in the development of a personalized reading guide.
  54. 54. ELEMENTS OF A READING GUIDE o Pace yourself.
  55. 55. KEY COMPONENTS  Appeals
  56. 56. Personalized Reading Suggestions for Mitzi Thomas Appeal Factors I selected authors and books based upon the following subject interests and appeal factors: I focused on your request for happy, uplifting books that are sometimes humorous with a sentimental or emotional style. I also chose books that are character driven, have a strong sense of place, and may expose you to new people, places and subjects. I selected both fiction and narrative nonfiction. Please note that some of these books are available in e-book format at the library and all are available in print. Check our “Audio and e-book downloads” page for availability.
  57. 57. KEY COMPONENTS  Authors  Titles  Reason for selection
  58. 58. THE ICING  Branding  Hyperlinks to catalog  Cross marketing
  59. 59. RESOURCES TO USE IN CREATING A GUIDE  NoveList  Early Word (www.earlyword.com)  BookList  Shelf Awareness  Bibliocommons lists  Popular magazines:  People  Entertainment Weekly  O (Oprah)  Real Simple  Ladies Home Journal  Your brain  Other library staff
  60. 60. WANT MORE? We’ll be offering a six-week eCourse beginning November 4. Some highlights: 1) Draft your own proposal 2) Create your own reader profile 3) Learn how other libraries are doing form-based R.A. 4) Create a personalized reading guide for a classmate and receive your own, too!
  61. 61. QUESTIONS?
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