R12 d49656 gc10-apps dba 16

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Oracle Applications, Oracle Database, D49656, Oracle Applications DBA

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  • ILT Schedule: Timing Topic 60 minutes Lecture 60 minutes Practice 120 minutes Total
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  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - AutoConfig A fresh installation of Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12 includes AutoConfig as a standard (and required) configuration management tool.
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  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - AutoConfig Operation AutoConfig template files are used as the starting point for creating site-specific configuration files. AutoConfig evaluates the context variables in a template file, determines the actual values required, and creates a configuration file with these values substituted. This process, described in more detail later in this chapter, is called instantiation. There is one template file for each configuration file. Template files are located in the various <PROD>_TOP/admin/template directories on the application tier, and in the <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/template directory on the database tier. AutoConfig driver files are used to list the corresponding template files and locations, and specify the commands to be executed. For example, the commands might update profile options. Driver files are located in each <PROD>_TOP/admin/driver directory on the application tier, and in the <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/template directory on the database tier. AutoConfig configuration files, such as httpd.conf, are created as a result of AutoConfig instantiating the corresponding template files. Configuration files contain values corresponding to the settings specified for a particular site. After AutoConfig has been run, numerous configuration files will have been created in various directories.
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  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Running AutoConfig – Application Tier Instructor Note: On Windows, a command is entered as a single line of text, which wraps to the next screen line if needed.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Running AutoConfig – Database Tier Instructor Note: The \\ (backslash) character on UNIX denotes that the command is continued on the following line. There is no equivalent on Windows.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - AutoConfig Log Files Log file directories are named <MMDDhhmm>, according to the month, day, hour, and minute of the AutoConfig run.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Rolling Back an AutoConfig Session Each execution of AutoConfig creates a rollback script in case you need to revert to the previous configuration settings.
  • AutoConfig Created Configuration Files All AutoConfig generated configuration files have the header information seen in this slide. You should not manually edit these files. Use OAM AutoConfig to edit parameters in the Applications Context, then run AutoConfig to regenerate the configuration files with the updated information.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - AutoConfig - Test Mode The AutoConfig test mode script, adchkcfg.sh (UNIX) or adchkcfg.cmd (Windows), is located in <AD_TOP>/bin on the application tier and in <RDBMS ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/bin on the database tier. This utility generates a report that highlights differences between existing configuration files and the new ones that AutoConfig will generate. The report is called cfgcheck.html. Running adchkcfg.sh is useful both in carrying out a test run before a planned environment change is made, and when investigating problems.
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  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - AutoConfig Configuration Report <MMDDhhmm> represents the month, day, hour, and minute of the AutoConfig test mode script session.
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  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Accessing OAM The AutoConfig feature of Oracle Applications Manager (OAM) is used to update and manage the context files. Log in to Oracle Applications from a suitable account.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Accessing OAM Click on Oracle Applications Manager (OAM).
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Accessing AutoConfig The OAM Dashboard appears. Click the Site Map tab. OAM displays a list of available links in the site. The AutoConfig link is located under the System Configuration heading of the Administration tab. Click on AutoConfig.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - OAM AutoConfig OAM displays the main AutoConfig page. For each node, the following information is shown: Name – shows the nodename Host – shows the hostname Last Synchronized Date – indicates when the database values and file values were last synchronized. Last Updated Date – indicates when the values in the database was last updated. Tier – shows the tier (database or Applications) for which the context file contains parameters. Synchronized – indicates whether the file and the system have been synchronized Node status – indicates whether the node is online. View – displays the context file Show History – displays history of changes made to the context file Edit Parameters – opens the Edit Parameters page
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - OAM AutoConfig Click on the name of the node or the name of the host to filter the list of information. Expand the Details column for your selection by clicking on the plus (+) sign. AutoConfig displays information about the version, creation date, path of the file, and name of the user who last made updates. The Status information corresponds to the Synchronized column value. ‘Write succeeded’ indicates that the synchronization between the OAM database and the context file was successful. Click on Edit Parameters to see the existing configuration parameters grouped by these categories: Global, System, Local, Environments, OA_Ports, OA_Services, and Custom.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Edit Parameters Page The initial Parameters page displays existing Global parameters. Information shown on all parameters pages includes: variable title, internal name (OA_VAR), change status indicator, value, and a short description. Clicking a category link displays the parameters associated with that category.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Edit Parameters Page For example, click the System tab to see the parameters associated with Oracle Applications system. You can also search for a specific parameter by entering its title (name), OA_ VAR (internal name), value, or description in the Search field. Choose the appropriate group of parameters and make necessary changes in the Value field. Click Save.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Confirmation Page AutoConfig displays a confirmation page and provides a space for comments. It also displays the entire contents of the context file, including the changed values. Notice that values are displayed in groups of 25. Click the arrows to move forward and back through the pages. Click OK to save the changes. Oracle Applications Manager automatically stores the new values and updates the context file. After updating the context file, run the AutoConfig script to generate new system configuration files that are propagated with the new values.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Confirmation Page AutoConfig reminds you to run the AutoConfig script to instantiate new configuration files and update the database profiles.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Support Cart Many pages throughout OAM have an Add to Support Cart button. The Support Cart feature allows you to save Oracle Applications Manager pages with their data, and then zip them into a file to send to Oracle Support, who can then view your pages in the Oracle Applications Manager display format.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Support Cart When you click the Add to Support Cart button, the page is added to the Support Cart. If you have filtered or sorted the data, your manipulated view is submitted.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Support Cart To view the contents of the Support Cart, click on the Support Cart icon from any page. The Support Cart Contents page lists each page placed in the cart and its Application Name. You can filter the list by Page or Application Name. Click the View icon to view a page in a separate window. Click on Save Cart to save the contents to a zip file that you can send to Oracle Support. Any contents of the cart that have not been saved are automatically deleted when you log out of Oracle Applications Manager. To restore a saved cart, click Restore Cart to browse your directory for the saved cart. Select a cart file from the list displayed, or use the Browse button to select a file from the directory. Click Restore.
  • Restoring a Previous Configuration With OAM AutoConfig, you can view a history of system configuration parameters stored by OAM. You can display the current configuration or previous ones, and request a comparison between the current configuration and a previous one. If necessary, AutoConfig can restore a previous set of configuration parameters, if an update was made in error, or did not suit your business requirements.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Restoring a Previous Configuration Click Show History in the AutoConfig initial page to access the Context File History page.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Restoring a Previous Configuration The Context File History page lists other configurations stored in OAM. It shows the version number, last synchronized date, last update date, the user who last updated the configuration, and any comments for each configuration. You can delete a previous configuration from the database by selecting it and clicking the Delete button. To see a contrast between the current configuration and one that you have used in the past, select a previous version from the list and click Show Differences from Current Configuration.
  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Comparing Configurations The Show Differences from Current Configuration page lists the parameters that differ in value between the previous configuration and the current one. To restore an individual value, select Restore Previous Value. This action replaces the value in the current configuration. On the next page you can enter comments regarding your change.
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  • <Course name> <Lesson number> - Refer to Practice - Editing Applications Context [LAB4205Y] Refer to Practice - Modifying your System [LAB4207Y] Refer to Practice - Rolling Back an AutoConfig Session [LAB4208Y] Refer to Practice - Restoring a Previous Configuration [LAB4209Y] Refer to Practice - Running AutoConfig in Test Mode [LAB420AY]
  • R12 d49656 gc10-apps dba 16

    1. 1. AutoConfig
    2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>At the end of this module, you should be able to do the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the Applications context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe AutoConfig </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the scripts used by AutoConfig </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Run AutoConfig to configure an Oracle Applications system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Update Applications context parameters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Restore Applications context parameters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Roll back an AutoConfig session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Run AutoConfig in test mode </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Module Overview <ul><li>This module introduces the AutoConfig utility and the process of configuring the Oracle Applications system </li></ul><ul><li>This module consists of the following topics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Context Files </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction to AutoConfig </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig Features </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig Operation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Running AutoConfig from Oracle Applications Manager </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using the Support Cart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Restoring a Previous Configuration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comparing Configurations </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Context Files <ul><ul><li>Rapid Install captures all the configuration parameters associated with your installation in two context files </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parameters for the application tier – the APPL_TOP and the Applications technology stack – are stored in the Applications context file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parameters for the database tier are stored in the database context file </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Context Files <ul><ul><li>You can edit the existing configuration parameters using Oracle Applications Manager (OAM) AutoConfig </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When you save the new parameters, OAM stores them in the OAM schema and automatically updates (synchronizes) the context files </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You must then run the AutoConfig script to update the system configuration files and database profiles with the new parameters </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Benefits of the Context Files <ul><ul><li>By describing all the services for a particular APPL_TOP in a single Applications context, services can be started up and shut down easily </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of a single Applications context allows services to be added or removed without having to modify the core startup/shutdown mechanism </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There are fewer files for Oracle Development to maintain and support, improving robustness and reliability across Oracle Applications </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Applications Context File <ul><li>The Applications context file: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is called <CONTEXT_NAME>.xml </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is in <INST_TOP>/apps/<CONTEXT_NAME>/appl/admin for each node of the application tier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contains configuration information for the application tier of a specific Oracle Applications system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is used to configure all the other files necessary to set up and make available a particular Oracle Applications system </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Database Context File <ul><li>The database context file: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is called <CONTEXT_NAME>.xml </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is in <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/ for the database tier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contains configuration information for the database tier of a particular Oracle Applications system </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Benefits of the Context Files <ul><li>All Applications specific configuration information is stored in the two context files, instead of in numerous files located in directories distributed across the system </li></ul><ul><li>Advantages of this strategy include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoids the need for repeated configuration information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The APPL_TOP environment is readily described in a single file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The database environment is readily described in a single file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier to integrate into the process of cloning new systems, as opposed to editing numerous files </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Benefits of the Context Files <ul><ul><li>The XML format is easier to read and use than a variety of formats in individual configuration files </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Configuration information is represented in a platform-independent format </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The context file is able to handle Windows registry information </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Benefits of the Context Files <ul><ul><li>Supports shared application tier file system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows you to synchronize multiple nodes </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Introduction to AutoConfig <ul><li>The main AutoConfig script: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is a tool that centralizes and simplifies Oracle Applications configuration management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Removes the need to make manual updates to configuration files, which can be tedious and prone to error if multiple files are involved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Works in conjunction with OAM to edit and update system configuration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Works in the same way on all platforms </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. AutoConfig and the Applications Context <ul><ul><li>All the information required for configuring an Oracle Applications instance is collected in a repository, called the context file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig maintains the context file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Details stored in the context file include hostname, domain name, directory structure, and port numbers used </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The OAM AutoConfig editor is used to make changes to the context file </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. AutoConfig and the Applications Context <ul><ul><li>The AutoConfig script uses information from the context file to generate all Applications configuration files and update database profiles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By supplying the configuration information in a standard location, AutoConfig simplifies procedures such as: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Upgrading an Applications technology stack component </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Starting and stopping Oracle Applications services </li></ul></ul></ul>
    15. 15. AutoConfig Template Files <ul><ul><li>The AutoConfig script uses template files to determine the basic settings that are needed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There is one template file for each configuration file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Different versions of the template files exist for UNIX and Windows </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The template files are located in the <PROD_TOP>/admin/template directories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li><AD_TOP>/admin/template </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li><FND_TOP>/admin/template </li></ul></ul></ul>
    16. 16. AutoConfig Tasks <ul><li>AutoConfig instantiation (creation) activities include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Instantiation of a configuration file to be used at runtime </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instantiation of a SQL script that will set profile option values that can be either site or instance-specific </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instantiation of a shell script or Windows command file that will run the just created SQL script via SQL*Plus, and then execute the shell script </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instantiation of scripts to start up and shut down services such as Java server processes </li></ul></ul>Script
    17. 17. AutoConfig Operation <ul><ul><li>The main AutoConfig script is adautocfg.sh (UNIX) or adautocfg.cmd (Windows) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Located in: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li><INST_TOP>/admin/scripts (Application tier) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li><RDBMS ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/scripts/<CONTEXT_NAME> ( Database tier) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This script calls another script </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li><AD_TOP>/bin/adconfig.sh (UNIX) <AD_TOP>binadconfig.cmd (Windows) </li></ul></ul></ul>adautocfg.sh adconfig.sh
    18. 18. AutoConfig Operation <ul><ul><li>AutoConfig creates configuration files by reading several different types of file from various locations: </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Running AutoConfig <ul><ul><li>You must run AutoConfig for your system to make any context file updates to your system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Doing so generates the new configuration files for the associated technology stack </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig uses the parameters stored in the context file and system configuration templates to create new process control scripts and update system profiles </li></ul></ul>Script
    20. 20. Running AutoConfig <ul><ul><li>1. Log on as the appropriate user and set the environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Stop all server processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Run AutoConfig on the application tier to update configuration and profiles on the application tier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4. Run AutoConfig on the database tier to update configuration and profiles on the database tier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5. Start all server processes </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Running AutoConfig - Application Tier <ul><li>To start AutoConfig on the application tier: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>UNIX: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig prompts for the APPS password </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig does not prompt for the APPS password; you must supply it on the command line </li></ul></ul></ul>$ <INST_TOP>/admin/scripts/adautocfg.sh C:> <INST_TOP>adminscriptsadautocfg.cmd <APPS password>
    22. 22. Running AutoConfig - Database Tier <ul><li>To Start AutoConfig on the database tier: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>UNIX: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig prompts for the APPS password </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AutoConfig does not prompt for the APPS password; you must supply it on the initial command line </li></ul></ul></ul>$ <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/scripts/ <CONTEXT_NAME>/adautocfg.sh C:> <RDBMS ORACLE_HOME>appsutilscripts <CONTEXT_NAME>adautocfg.cmd <APPS password>
    23. 23. AutoConfig Log Files <ul><li>AutoConfig log files are stored under: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Application tier: <INST_TOP>/admin/log/<MMDDhhmm>/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Database tier: <RDBMS ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/log/<CONTEXT_NAME>/ <MMDDhhmm> </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There is one log file per AutoConfig session, containing detailed information about every action that AutoConfig performed in that run </li></ul>Log
    24. 24. Rolling Back an AutoConfig Session <ul><li>The rollback script and all backup configuration files from each AutoConfig session are stored in: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Application Tier: <INST_TOP>/admin/out/<MMDDhhmm> </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Database Tier: <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/out/<CONTEXT_NAME>/ <MMDDhhmm> where:<MMDDhhmm> = (month, day, hour, minute of AutoConfig run) </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Rolling Back an AutoConfig Session <ul><li>To roll back the effects of an AutoConfig run, go to the relevant directory and run the appropriate restore script: </li></ul><ul><li>UNIX: </li></ul><ul><li>Windows: </li></ul>$ restore.sh D:> restore.cmd
    26. 26. Editing AutoConfig-Managed Configuration Files <ul><ul><li>All AutoConfig generated configuration files contain the following header information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You should not manually edit these files </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use OAM AutoConfig to edit parameters in the Applications Context, then run AutoConfig to regenerate the configuration files </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Running AutoConfig In Test Mode <ul><ul><li>Running the AutoConfig script to propagate changes overwrites the existing configuration files </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This process may overwrite any customizations you made to the configuration files </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To prevent any unwanted changes, use the test (check) mode to determine the impact of running AutoConfig, without actually making any updates </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Running AutoConfig in Test Mode – Application Tier <ul><li>To run AutoConfig in test mode on the application tier, run one of the following commands: </li></ul><ul><li>UNIX: </li></ul><ul><li>Windows: </li></ul><ul><li>AutoConfig prompts for the location of the Applications context file and the APPS password </li></ul>$ <AD_TOP>/bin/adchkcfg.sh C:> <AD_TOP>binadchkcfg.cmd
    29. 29. Running AutoConfig in Test Mode – Database Tier <ul><li>To run AutoConfig in test mode on the database tier: </li></ul><ul><li>UNIX: </li></ul><ul><li>Windows: </li></ul><ul><li>AutoConfig prompts for the location of the database context file and the APPS password </li></ul>$ <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/bin/adchkcfg.sh C:> <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>appsutilbin adchkcfg.cmd
    30. 30. Running AutoConfig in Test Mode – AutoConfig Configuration Report <ul><ul><li>The AutoConfig test mode script produces a configuration report that shows the changes the AutoConfig script would have made </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The configuration report, cfgcheck.html, is written to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>On the application tier: <INST_TOP>/admin/out/<MMDDhhmm> </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>On the database tier: <RDBMS_ORACLE_HOME>/appsutil/log/ <CONTEXT_NAME>/<MMDDhhmm> </li></ul></ul></ul>
    31. 31. <ul><ul><li>AutoConfig test mode script example output (tail): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An example of cfgcheck.html report contents is shown on the next slides </li></ul></ul>Running AutoConfig in Test Mode – AutoConfig Configuration Report (cont.)
    32. 32. AutoConfig Configuration Report – Example
    33. 33. AutoConfig Configuration Report – Example (cont.) <ul><ul><li>AutoConfig test mode script example: </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. Running AutoConfig from Oracle Applications Manager
    35. 35. Running AutoConfig from Oracle Applications Manager
    36. 36. Running AutoConfig from Oracle Applications Manager
    37. 37. AutoConfig Main Screens
    38. 38. AutoConfig Main Screens
    39. 39. Editing Parameters
    40. 40. Editing Parameters
    41. 41. Confirming Changes
    42. 42. Confirming Changes
    43. 43. Using the Support Cart
    44. 44. Using the Support Cart
    45. 45. Using the Support Cart
    46. 46. Restoring a Previous Configuration <ul><li>To view configuration history and restore a previous configuration: </li></ul><ul><li>Access AutoConfig via OAM </li></ul><ul><li>View configuration history </li></ul><ul><li>Select the configuration parameters </li></ul><ul><li>Restore configuration </li></ul>
    47. 47. Restoring a Previous Configuration
    48. 48. Restoring a Previous Configuration
    49. 49. Comparing Configurations
    50. 50. Module Summary <ul><li>In this module, you should have learned how to do the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the Applications Context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Update Applications Context parameters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Restore Applications Context parameters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe AutoConfig </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Run AutoConfig to configure your Oracle Applications system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Roll back an AutoConfig session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the control scripts created by AutoConfig </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Run AutoConfig in test mode </li></ul></ul>
    51. 51. Module Discussion <ul><ul><li>Describe the purpose and content of the Applications Context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are some benefits of the Applications context? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the benefits of the Support Cart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outline the procedure to update an Applications context parameter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe the primary benefits and usage of AutoConfig </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How are template files used by AutoConfig? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the process of updating the application tier control files? </li></ul></ul>
    52. 52. Module Practice <ul><ul><li>Editing Applications context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Configuring your system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rolling back an AutoConfig session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Restoring a previous configuration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Running AutoConfig in test mode </li></ul></ul>

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