DISCUSSION QUESTIONSWhat are your career advancement/path goals?CHOOSE ONE GOAL TO EXPLORE WITH THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:  ...
MENTORING TERMINOLOGY Orientation Mentors Assigned individual who may or may not be the employee’’s direct supervisor and ...
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTEmployees and managers should work together to identify the kinds of professional development(PD) ...
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Gaining Mastery in the Field Presentation: Mentor & Professional Development Checklist

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Gaining Mastery in the Field Presentation: Mentor & Professional Development Checklist

  1. 1. DISCUSSION QUESTIONSWhat are your career advancement/path goals?CHOOSE ONE GOAL TO EXPLORE WITH THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: Based on your goal, what do you wish to obtain from having a mentor or gain from participating in professional development? List the action steps you plan to take in reaching your goal. How might you encourage mentoring and/or professional development opportunities within your institution? How might you involve outside professional associations with these opportunities? THE CHARM AND CHALLENGES OF GAINING MASTERY IN THE FIELD WESTERN MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION 2011 CONFERENCE PANELIST CONTACT INFORMATION Susan Spero, Ph.D. Timothy Hecox Professor Museum Studies Exhibit Developer John F. Kennedy University Oregon Museum of Science and Industry Berkeley, CA Portland, OR sspero@jfku.edu THecox@omsi.edu Adrienne Barnett, MBA, MA Angela Hudson Program Manager Teacher Institute, Museum Educator for Youth & Family Programs Exploratorium Tacoma Art Museum San Francisco, CA Tacoma, WA abarnett@exploratorium.edu Ahudson@tacomaartmuseum.org
  2. 2. MENTORING TERMINOLOGY Orientation Mentors Assigned individual who may or may not be the employee’’s direct supervisor and helps acclimate and orient new employees to an institution. Skills based Mentors –– Mentors with experience in a particular aspect of a job, this may or may not be an individual’’s direct supervisor (i.e. teaching methods, budgeting, exhibit design). Career Mentors Mentors who have been in the field for many years and can help guide mentees along their career paths. In Person vs. Remote –– In person mentoring can happen one on one or in groups, but mentoring can also happen remotely via the phone, email exchanges, or video chatting. Internal vs. External –– Mentors can come from within the museum, from other museums, or from other industries. CREATING A MENTORSHIP PROGRAM: MUSEUM CHECKLIST Organizational leadership demonstrates support for the concept and implementation of a mentoring program. Completion of a needs assessment and analysis of the opportunities and resources available to staff. Establish clear objectives and evaluation measures for mentors and mentees. Modest amount of staff time is allocated to coordinate or administer the program. Provide orientation or training for mentors. The use of structured agreements to define roles, norms, and procedures. Adapted from Ken Williams (2005), Mentoring the Next Generation of Nonprofit Leaders (see resource list) PERSONAL ACTION PLAN FOR MENTORING NOTE: THIS CHECKLIST ASSUMES YOUR MUSEUM HAS NO MENTORSHIP PROGRAM At this stage in your career would you benefit from being a mentor or a mentee? Determine what form of mentoring you feel would be the most helpful to you (orientation, skills based, career). Assess what areas you would like to be mentored/mentee in (teaching methods, budgeting, exhibit design, leadership, etc). Determine how you would prefer to mentor or be mentored (in person, phone, on line). Would you prefer an external or internal mentor/mentee? EXTERNAL INTERNAL Visit AAM Online Mentoring Program Speak with human resources or your supervisor Take home at least one business card from this about mentoring at your museum conference of a potential mentor/mentee Informally speak to individuals that you feel Contact potential mentor/mentee would be potential mentors/mentees Use the Museum Checklist (above) and the Resource List below to help establish a mentor relationship/program MENTORING RESOURCE LISTMentoring the Next Generation of Nonprofit Leaders: A Practical Guide for ManagersKen Williams, Academy for Educational Development Center for Leadership Developmentcld.aed.org/PDF/MentoringNextGeneration.pdfBest Practices Module: Mentoring Programs Joy Davis, British Columbia Museum Associationwww.museumsassn.bc.ca/Images/Best%20Practices%20Modules%202/Mentoring%20Programs%20FINAL.pdfAssociation of American MuseumsAAM Mentoring 101 www.aam us.org/getinvolved/emp/mentoring101.cfmAAM Online Mentoring Program www.aam us.org/mentoring.cfmA web assisted program for AAM members designed to match mentors and mentees for professional development. Created by Adrienne Barnett –– abarnett@exploratorium.edu Adapted from 2011 JFKU Master Thesis –– Catch Them if You Can: Building Career Pathways for Millennials in Science Center/Museums For WMA 2011 Conference Session, The Charm and Challenges of Gaining Mastery in the Field
  3. 3. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTEmployees and managers should work together to identify the kinds of professional development(PD) opportunities that not only assist individuals’’ professional growth, but also help to bestadvance the needs of the organization. This process may be administered under a structuredorganization wide system, informally, or through a yearly review process. COMMON FORMS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DESIRED BY MUSEUM STAFF Mentors Opportunities to attend conferences Professional training programs Participating in professional groups or Graduate education reimbursement associations Informal or internally peer led workshops Networking opportunities PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT RECOMMENDATIONS & MUSEUM CHECKLIST Provide optional professional development opportunities to all employees on company time. Require some forms of mandatory PD such as: o Orientation trainings for new staff o Content trainings for frontline staff o Supervisory and administrative training for managers at all levels of the organization Ensure that PD remains in the budget for every staff member. Employees ““apply”” and ““share”” what they learn at certain kinds of external PD, such as conference attendance, external seminars, and graduate reimbursement. PERSONAL ACTION PLAN FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Speak to human resources or your direct supervisor about what forms of PD are available at your museum. Do not assume that the institution has no funds for PD. It is best to ask and find out. If you desire PD not offered at your museum implement something yourself. Ideas for informal internally led PD: o Workshops and talks given by staff on areas such as museum content, classroom management, project management, budgeting, leadership skills, etc. o Affinity groups that meet to discuss relevant topics over lunch o Use museum programs –– allow staff to attend programs for school groups, teachers, and general public o Museum ““academy”” model –– skills and content workshop series and attendance is positively viewed in the staff review process o Join forces with local museums to do staff ““workshop swaps”” or tours o Summits –– day long meetings with workshops, activities, and speakers for staff o Site visits –– as a group visit other museums or potential partner organizations o Lunch time video series on museum content topics o Other: Take charge of your career. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESOURCE LISTWestern Museums Association Conferences and blog www.westmuse.orgAmerican Association of MuseumsProfessional Development www.aam us.org/getinvolved/learn/index.cfmEmerging Museum Professionals www.aam us.org/getinvolved/emp/index.cfmAssociation of Science Technology Centers Professional Development www.astc.org/profdev/index.htm Created by Adrienne Barnett –– abarnett@exploratorium.edu Adapted from 2011 JFKU Master Thesis –– Catch Them if You Can: Building Career Pathways for Millennials in Science Center/Museums For WMA 2011 Conference Session, The Charm and Challenges of Gaining Mastery in the Field

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