ADJECTIVES:
REVISION: RULES
FOR COMPARATIVES
AND SUPERLATIVES
Advanced Level 1
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


How do you form the comparative and
superlative of these adjectiv...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives
One syllable adjectives generally form
the comparative by adding -er...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives
If an adjective ends in -e, this is removed
when adding -er/-est, e....
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


More and most are sometimes used with one
syllable adjectives as ...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


How do you form the comparative and
superlative of these adjectiv...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


Two syllable adjectives ending in -y
usually form the comparative...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


How do you form the comparative and
superlative of these adjectiv...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives



Two syllable adjectives ending in -ed, -ing,
-ful, or -less alwa...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


How do you form the comparative and
superlative of these adjectiv...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives
As a general rule, most other two
syllable adjectives also form
comp...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


How do you form the comparative and
superlative of these adjectiv...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


Adjectives which have three or more syllables always form the
com...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


How do you form the comparative and
superlative of these adjectiv...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


The adjectives ill and well, describing bad and
good health, have...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives






The usual comparative and superlative forms
of the adjectiv...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives


Going skiing was the most nervewracking experience I’ve had.



...
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives
Revision: rules to form
comparatives and superlatives




Some compound adjectives have a first
element consisting of an...
References


http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/eng



http://www.onestopenglish.com/grammar/g
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Na1 adjectives revision_rules_for_comparatives_and_superlatives

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Na1 adjectives revision_rules_for_comparatives_and_superlatives

  1. 1. ADJECTIVES: REVISION: RULES FOR COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES Advanced Level 1
  2. 2. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  How do you form the comparative and superlative of these adjectives?
  3. 3. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives One syllable adjectives generally form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est.  If a one syllable adjective ends in a single vowel letter followed by a single consonant letter, the consonant letter is doubled, e.g.: thin  thinner, big  biggest. 
  4. 4. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives If an adjective ends in -e, this is removed when adding -er/-est, e.g.: wide  wider/widest.  If an adjective ends in a consonant followed by -y, it is replaced by -i when adding -er/-est, e.g.: dry  drier/driest.  What can you observe in these sentences?   The icing was supposed to be pink and white, but it looked more red than pink.  That sofa might look nice, but this one is more soft and comfortable.
  5. 5. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  More and most are sometimes used with one syllable adjectives as an alternative to the -er/est form when we want to emphasize the comparison (first sentence), or if the adjective occurs with another adjective which has more than one syllable (second sentence).
  6. 6. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  How do you form the comparative and superlative of these adjectives?
  7. 7. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  Two syllable adjectives ending in -y usually form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est, (note the change of -y to -i in the comparative/superlative).
  8. 8. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  How do you form the comparative and superlative of these adjectives?
  9. 9. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  Two syllable adjectives ending in -ed, -ing, -ful, or -less always form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
  10. 10. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  How do you form the comparative and superlative of these adjectives?
  11. 11. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives As a general rule, most other two syllable adjectives also form comparatives and superlatives with more and most, apart from those ending in –y.  However, a few two-syllable adjectives can take either -er/-est or more/most. The ones seen before are five of the most common examples. 
  12. 12. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  How do you form the comparative and superlative of these adjectives?
  13. 13. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  Adjectives which have three or more syllables always form the comparative and superlative with more and most.  Only exceptions: some three syllable adjectives formed by adding the prefix -un to another adjective, especially those formed from an adjective ending in -y. These adjectives can form comparatives and superlatives by using more/most or adding -er/est, e.g.:   Unhappy  unhappier  the unhappiest/most unhappy Unfriendly  unfriendlier  the unfriendliest/most unfriendly
  14. 14. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  How do you form the comparative and superlative of these adjectives?  Good   better  the best  Bad   worse  the worst  Far   farther/further  the farthest/furthest  These adjectives have irregular comparative and superlative forms.
  15. 15. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  The adjectives ill and well, describing bad and good health, have irregular comparative forms. The comparative of ill is worse, and the comparative of well is better, e.g.: She’s feeling much better/worse today. It’s the oldest/*eldest castle in Britain.  We’re all getting older/*elder. My brother is older/*elder than me.   What happens in these sentences?
  16. 16. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives    The usual comparative and superlative forms of the adjective old are older and oldest. However, the alternative forms elder and eldest are sometimes used. Elder and eldest are generally restricted to talking about the age of people, especially people within the same family, and are not used to talk about the age of things (as in the first sentence). Elder cannot occur in the predicative position after link verbs such as be, become, get, etc. (as in the second sentence).
  17. 17. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives  Going skiing was the most nervewracking experience I’ve had.  Comparatives and superlatives of compound adjectives are generally formed by using more and most.
  18. 18. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives
  19. 19. Revision: rules to form comparatives and superlatives   Some compound adjectives have a first element consisting of an adjective which would normally form a comparative or superlative in one word, either by adding -er/-est, or by an irregular form. Such compound adjectives can therefore form a comparative/superlative by using these changes to the first adjective, rather than by using more/most.
  20. 20. References  http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/eng  http://www.onestopenglish.com/grammar/g

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