Teaching Tenses

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Teaching Tenses, by Rosemary Aitken is a classic 'must have' for ESL/EFL teachers, which focuses exclusively on the main tenses in English. It is a practical and pragmatic source of ideas for presenting and practicing grammar is the perfect antidote to mind-bending grammatical theory. Its main features are:

* succinct focus on meaning, form, use and pronunciation with clear timelines to highlight meaning
* common leaner difficulties and errors
* suggested contexts and practice activities

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Teaching Tenses

  1. 1. A mini play about Teaching Tenses
  2. 2. I need a book.
  3. 3. What kind of book?
  4. 4. A grammar book… but not your typical kind like this:
  5. 5. I want a great one… …with clear, simple explanations Milenio newspaper advertisement
  6. 6. … and a focus on typical learner errors for each tense They all have went to the film festival. If only my grammar book had prepared me for that error… That ain’t right..
  7. 7. … and real world practice ideas
  8. 8. … with photocopiable activities
  9. 9. The perfect grammar book
  10. 10. That does sound like the perfect book.
  11. 11. Yah - But where can I find it!?
  12. 12. Stop searching !
  13. 13. Clear explanations Lists of typical learner errors for each tense Great activity ideas for real world practice Photocopiable activities
  14. 14. Simple grammar explanations <ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Present perfect simple </li></ul><ul><li>Meaning and function: </li></ul><ul><li>The present perfect shows the present situation </li></ul><ul><li>in relation to past action; that is, how the past is relevant to now </li></ul><ul><li>For uncompleted actions where both actor and result remain </li></ul><ul><li>A single continuous action: I have lived in Toronto for 10 years. </li></ul><ul><li>A repeated or habitual action or truth: My mother has always played tennis. </li></ul><ul><li>B ) For an action which took place in an identified period of time, which is not yet over </li></ul><ul><li>I’ve read a book this morning (this morning is not yet finished). This usage also suggests some present consequence </li></ul><ul><li>C) For an action which took place in the past; but whose results are still present </li></ul><ul><li>I’ve spilt the milk (it’s still on the floor). </li></ul>I moved to Toronto I have lived in Toronto for 10 years. (I still live there) Full Form Negative Form I you we they have (‘ve) walked drunk run I you we they have not (haven’t) walked drunk run he she it has (‘s) he she it Has not (hasn’t) Have you walked? Haven’t you walked?
  15. 15. Typical learner errors <ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Present perfect simple </li></ul><ul><li>Learner Error: Form, Spelling and Pronunciation </li></ul><ul><li>Contracted forms create phonetic problems </li></ul><ul><li>Contracted ‘s’ understood as ‘is’ </li></ul><ul><li>Contracted forms not heard at all </li></ul><ul><li>Learner Error: Meaning and Function </li></ul><ul><li>Where the action is not complete, students may use the present simple or present continuous, especially with the use of ‘since’. (French/Spanish/Indian languages) </li></ul>“ I am knowing him since I was small.” /a I hæf/, /a I ha:f/, /a I f/ for “ I have”
  16. 16. Real world activity ideas Example: Present perfect simple <ul><li>For uncompleted actions where both actor and result remain </li></ul><ul><li>Geographical or currently relevant historical information from fact sheets (the building was a school, but has been a hotel for three years..) </li></ul><ul><li>B ) For an action which took place in an identified period of time, which is not yet over </li></ul><ul><li>A list of the week’s necessary tasks. The students hare told that it is now Wednesday night, and asked to produce a timetable for Thursday, by finding out from each other which tasks are already complete and what remains to be done. </li></ul><ul><li>C) For an action which took place in the past; but whose results are still present </li></ul><ul><li>A picture story leads to a narrative. Begin in the present continuous then introduce new pictures showing a strong clues, which should lead them into present perfect ( what’s happened? ). </li></ul>
  17. 17. Photocopiable activities Sorry folks – for these, you’ll just have to trust us that they’re good. (they are.)
  18. 18. Published by: Distributed by: For further information on this, or any other book you are searching for, please contact us at: 46 St. Clair Ave. E, Toronto, ON 416-850-0833 [email_address] www.knowingbooks.ca

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