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Email Etiquette workshop slideshow

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An abbreviated version of the slideshow accompanying the Email Etiquette workshop by Steuart Snooks

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Email Etiquette workshop slideshow

  1. 1. Presenter: Steuart Snooks Skills and strategies for writing more effective email communications
  2. 2. Today’s Agenda The WWW of Mastering Email 7 Ways to Write More Effective Email The Science of Email Influence
  3. 3. The Challenge of Email Communication Research suggests 80% of business communication is now handled via email Email has largely replaced face-to-face and phone conversations Email has no signals, clues or feedback such as eye contact, body language or voice tone
  4. 4. How to Get What You What From Every Email You Send All language and communication is an attempt to persuade or influence someone. There is no neutral language.
  5. 5. How to Get What You What From Every Email You Send There is always a desired outcome – to be respected, understood, agreed with or just listened to
  6. 6. We use language to get what we want (if used well) or what we don’t want (if not used well) How to Get What You What From Every Email You Send
  7. 7. 7 Ways to Write More Effective E-mail 1: Think first – is e-mail the best way for this message/person 2: Communicating in the Age of Speed 3: What is Your Desired Outcome? 4: How to Write Better Subject Lines 5: Automate Your Follow up 6: Why the Inverted Pyramid Structure works best 7: Why You Should Write an E-mail Backwards Solutions for Success 2015 www.emailtiger.com.au
  8. 8. Strategy #1: Think First
  9. 9. What sort of messages are not appropriate to be sent via email? • Confidential or private messages • Offensive, abusive etc • When delivering bad news • Complex issues • Delicate negotiation • Performance review, discipline or reprimands • Urgent messages • Meeting requests • Gossip/rumours • Closing a sale 1: Think first – is e-mail the best way?
  10. 10. What sort of people is it not appropriate to communicate with via email? • Those in roles who don’t access email often or at all • Those with reading or language limitations • Older generations who may struggle with email technology • Certain personality styles who just aren’t email savvy • Other languages/cultures 1: Think first – is e-mail the best way?
  11. 11. Communication/task/activity Best choice of medium Arranging a meeting Calendar invite (not email ping pong) for internal: Email or share calendar for external Delegate simple task Email Delegate complex task Meeting backed up by email Delicate negotiation Meeting Follow up after an incident Face-to-face conversation (meeting) Gossip/jokes Face-to-face (never email) Internal news Intranet, blog, wiki (email with link) Making a sale Email to 'warm up'; close with face-to-face conversation (meeting) Performance feedback/review Face-to-face conversation (meeting) - never email Refusal/rejection Email (diamond sequence) or letter Send information Email [with attachment(s) if necessary] Send meeting agenda/papers Email with attachments (not as part of meeting invite) Socialising/trivia Text/IM Special thanks Handwritten note (richer medium = higher perceived sincerity) Who knows about . . . Email selectively (not to everyone) When to email? Solutions for Success 2015 www.emailtiger.com.au
  12. 12. Email better than IM when Text needs to be memorialised (ie: kept and archived for future reference) Contains an announcement to be sent to many people IM better than email when Issue demands immediate response (ie: ‘urgent’ AND important) Issue is relatively trivial (eg: lunch plans) IM better than phone when Multiple participants all need to talk or be involved When confidentiality is important but participant(s) can be overheard Numerous many-to-many conversations are taking place Phone better than IM when Many people participating passively and only one person speaking A more personal touch is required and nuances of voice make a difference Email vs IM vs Phone
  13. 13. Strategy #2: The Challenge of Communicating in the Age of Speed
  14. 14. Timeneedtocommunicate Degree/depthofunderstanding Greater context or richness Asynchronous Synchronous Digital Auditory Visual Solutions for Success 2013 www.emailtiger.com.au 2: Communicating in the Age of Speed Media richness framework (based on a theory by Daft & Lengel)
  15. 15. How easy is it to be misunderstood? What is the impact if your message is misunderstood? If misunderstood, how quickly can it be rectified? 1: 2: 3: Three considerations:
  16. 16. Strategy #3: What is Your Desired Outcome? Solutions for Success 2015 www.emailtiger.com.au
  17. 17. Which is the most important element of an email? Question
  18. 18. Action required: Response requested: Read only: FYI: 3: What is your desired outcome
  19. 19. Use Drafts folder for subject lines
  20. 20. Use Drafts folder for subject lines
  21. 21. Set up 4 subject lines as draft emails Activity
  22. 22. Greetings & Signatures Greetings • Dear • Hello • Hi Signatures 1. New messages 2. Replies See page 61
  23. 23. Strategy #4: What Makes an Effective Subject Line? Solutions for Success 2015 www.emailtiger.com.au
  24. 24. To To cc cc Use BCC only to control replies and safeguard privacy Action required: Response requested: Read only: FYI: Deadline When Due by Before Desired Outcome Timeframe Target 4: What makes an effective subject line?
  25. 25. To cc 1: Desired outcome clearly stated (so the reader knows what’s expected of them 2: Timeframe specified 3: Clear, concise description of the subject Recipient placed in the TO box – an action is expected Recipient placed in the CC box – for their information only, no action or response expected 4: What makes an effective subject line?
  26. 26. Addressing your message To CC BCC Reply All Forward See pages 64-65
  27. 27. https://blogs.office.com/2012/03/23/5-tips-on-using-bcc-in-outlook-email/
  28. 28. Sending attachments Some considerations 1. Send a document link or hyperlink whenever possible (instead of an attachment) 2. When sending more than 5 documents, attach a note explaining • number of documents, • reading order and • direct them to specific sections requiring their attention 3. When sending to smartphones (where attachments are hard to manage), copy and paste key information into body of email (ie: executive summary)
  29. 29. How do you keep track of e-mails you need to follow up? Question
  30. 30. Strategy #5: Automate Your Follow up Solutions for Success 2015 www.emailtiger.com.au
  31. 31. 5: Automate your follow up
  32. 32. 5: Automate your follow up
  33. 33. 5: Automate your follow up
  34. 34. 5: Automate your follow up
  35. 35. 5: Automate your follow up Keeping track of follow ups Black if pending Red if overdue
  36. 36. Set up ‘For Follow Up’ Search Folder Activity
  37. 37. Strategy #6: Why Inverted Pyramid Structure Works Best Solutions for Success 2015 www.emailtiger.com.au
  38. 38. Main Point Summary of your main point, request, recommendation or solutions Supporting details Background, reasons explanations, details Any next steps Concise close Sign off 6: Why INVERTED PYRAMID structure work best
  39. 39. The F-shape A heatmap from eye-tracking study of websites. Areas viewed most are red, then yellow, then blue. Grey areas were not viewed at all. 6: Why INVERTED PYRAMID structure work best main point here
  40. 40. Main Point Summary of your main point, request, recommendation or solutions Supporting details Background, reasons explanations, details Any next steps Concise close Sign off 6: Why INVERTED PYRAMID structure work best Best suits all the various personality & communication styles Driver, Director, Controller, Choleric Expressive, Intuiative, Sanguine Amiable, Realtor, Feeler, Phelgmatic Analyst, Thinker, Melancholic
  41. 41. Inverted Pyramid examples 1. We looked over the research, talked to the employees, and checked the budget. We have decided to go ahead with the expansion. 2. We have decided to expand our operation. The research supports it. The employees are for it, and the budget will sustain it. Which sentence uses inverted pyramid structure?
  42. 42. DATE: 11th May, 2015 TO: John Smith FROM: Fred Bloggs SUBJECT: Need for a Coordination Clerk The need for photocopying services is growing at this department. Copying requests from all the departments are sent to the Purchasing Department, because the photocopy machine is located here. However, we are the only area without an assigned control clerk. As a result of this, the copy-related accounting, reorder of paper, and repair calls are not coordinated. Because of the overall volume of work being handled by the Purchasing Division, and the increasing demand for this service, these functions can no longer be performed by a department of this size. It is essential that we add a coordination clerk to the Purchasing Division. Inverted Pyramid examples What should be changed in this email? Type your answer in the chat box
  43. 43. The 5:30 Rule Give a 5 second overview of your message and then expand on it with a 30 second version Why INVERTED PYRAMID structure work best
  44. 44. Why INVERTED PYRAMID structure work best Summaries before details Requests before reasons Solutions before explanations Recommendations before background info
  45. 45. The A-B-C method Inverted Pyramid Structure Main Point Supporting details Close
  46. 46. Find past sent emails and convert to Inverted Pyramid structure Activity
  47. 47. Strategy #7: Why You Write an Email Backwards Solutions for Success 2015 www.emailtiger.com.au
  48. 48. 7: Why You Should Write an E-mail Backwards 1: Edit message • Proof read • Spell check • Grammar check • Insert bullets points to break up text • Use Inverted Pyramid structure
  49. 49. 2: Write subject line 1: Edit message 7: Why You Should Write an E-mail Backwards
  50. 50. 3: Address message last 2: Write subject line 1: Edit message 7: Why You Should Write an E-mail Backwards
  51. 51. The Science of Email Influence • Understanding Your reader • Interpreting the Real Message • Recognising Key Words & Language • Structuring Your Emails
  52. 52. Strategy #1: Understanding Your Reader
  53. 53. The 4 Communication Styles Visual Auditory Kinesthetic Digital
  54. 54. The 4 Communication Styles Auditory Kinesthetic Digital Visual • Process/organize through vision: what they ‘see’ • Speak at fast pace • Memorise by seeing pictures • Less distracted by noise
  55. 55. The Visual Communciator Visual word choices Visual phrases Clear View See Vision Show Appear Sight Picture Read Diagram Blind Horizon Illuminate Clarify Notice Highlight Glance Dim Imagine • We can look to the future • Paint a picture • Can you see my . . . ? • See you later • Let’s focus on the job • A sight for sore eyes • This is my vision • Let me make to crystal clear • Can you picture that? • This will shed some light on the issue Outlook Vanish Disappear Scan Reveal Gaze Glimpse Sight-see Expose Faced Observed Enlighten Vivid Bright Visualise Blurred Fuzzy Hindsight Preview
  56. 56. The 4 Communication Styles Visual Kinesthetic Digital Auditory • Process/organize through sound: what they ‘hear’ • Speak at more deliberate pace • Absorb information by listening • Very sensitive to sound
  57. 57. The Auditory Communciator Auditory word choices Auditory phrases Hear Tell Talk Speak Voice Sound Silence Announce Yell Roar Debate Discuss Conversation Translate Request Mention Gossip • Shall we discuss • Did you hear me • Sounds good to me • Hold your tongue • Loud and clear • In a manner of speaking • Let’s talk this over • Voice an opinion • That resonates with me • Listen to this • Keep an ear open Phrase Divulge Earful Listen Undertones Recite Tune Noisy Rumour Outspoken Remark Echo Proclaim Harmonise Call Shout Resonate Auditory word choices Auditory phrases
  58. 58. The 4 Communication Styles Visual Auditory Digital Kinesthetic • Process/organize through sense: what they ‘touch/taste/smell/feel’ • Speak at a deliberate pace • Memorise by experiental activity • Transform input into feelings and sensations
  59. 59. The Kinesthetic Communciator Kinesthetic word choices Kinesthetic phrases Feel Felt Grab Scrape Touch Hold Grasp Walk Stiff Soft Hard Smooth Strong Calm Handle Solid Pressure • My gut feeling • I grasp the idea now • I’m not following you • Get in touch with • Start from scratch • Come to grips with • It’s a pain in the neck • I’m getting a handle on it • I was touched • I sensed that • I had a feeling • That’s a solid idea • She’s cool, calm and collected • Explore the possibilities Sharp Dry Thick Tremble Warm Exciting Stress Stretch Slip Strain Concrete Anxious Sensitive Hurt Clumsy Contact Bearable
  60. 60. The 4 Communication Styles Visual Auditory Kinesthetic Digital • Process/organize through what makes sense in their head’ • Speak in a monotone • Process information in their head • Can seem to lack emotion
  61. 61. The Digital Communciator Digital word choices Digital phrases Feel Felt Grab Scrape Touch Hold Grasp Walk Stiff Soft Hard Smooth Strong Calm Handle Solid Pressure • I’ll think about it • It doesn’t make sense • Let me consider your proposal • Interpret the data • Calculate the outcome • I understand the problem • Where’s the logic • We need to factor in . . . • Review the facts • What’s the bottom line • Do a complete study • What are your thoughts? • Going round in my head Sharp Dry Thick Tremble Warm Exciting Stress Stretch Slip Strain Concrete Anxious Sensitive Hurt Clumsy Contact Bearable
  62. 62. Strategy #2: Interpreting the Real Message
  63. 63. Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative One of the most important tools for generating trust and rapport in email conversations is ‘mirroring’. Mirroring language to build rapport
  64. 64. Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative This is the process of identifying key words and language used by the sender and then using these in your response. Mirroring language to build rapport
  65. 65. Mirroring language to build rapport Visual Rapport Visual mismatch Geoff: “From what I can see, that should work” Clare: “Looks good to me too” Jeff: “How does that proposal look to you?” Vera: “I feel it’s okay”
  66. 66. Mirroring language to build rapport Auditory Rapport Auditory mismatch Jeff: “How does that proposal sound to you?” Vera: “It sounds great” Jeff: “How does that proposal sound to you?” Vera: “It feels about right”
  67. 67. Mirroring language to build rapport Auditory Rapport Auditory mismatch Geoff: “That idea resonates with me” Clare: “I hear what you’re saying” Geoff: “I’m not sure you’ve heard everything” Clare: “I saw the whole presentation”
  68. 68. Mirroring language to build rapport Kinesthetic Rapport Kinesthetic mismatch Brian: “How does that proposal feel to you?” Vera: “It is very solid” Brian: “How does that proposal feel to you?” Vera: “It looks fine”
  69. 69. Mirroring language to build rapport Kinesthetic Rapport Kinesthetic mismatch Geoff: “Are you sure you have a handle on it” Clare: “Yes, I have a good feel for it” Geoff: “I’m not sure you’re in touch with recent events” Clare: “I can picture what’s been happening”
  70. 70. Mirroring language to build rapport Digital Rapport Digital mismatch Geoff: “Are you sure you understand the scope of this project?” Clare: “Yes, I comprehend the details” Geoff: “Are you sure you understand the scope of this project?” Clare: “Yes, I’ve got a good feel for it”
  71. 71. Mirroring language to build rapport Digital Rapport Digital mismatch Jeff: “What do you think of the proposal” Vera: “I think it’s excellent” Jeff: “What do you think of the proposal” Vera: “It sounds good”
  72. 72. Strategy #3: Recognising Tone and Key Words/Language
  73. 73. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative
  74. 74. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Affirmative
  75. 75. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Can, allow, decide, want, choose, desire, opportunity, commitment
  76. 76. Affirmative example Jack, It is my desire to implement the program. We feel it will benefit our sales team. I want to get started as soon as you can roll it out. Regards Judy
  77. 77. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Affirmative Imperative
  78. 78. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Can, permit, decide, want, choose, desire, opportunity, commitment Must, need, should, ought, supposed, got to, have to, it’s time, necessary
  79. 79. Imperative example Geoff, We have to get the project out today. It must be worked on until it is fully complete. I will call you by the end of the day to check this has been done. Regards, Bruce
  80. 80. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative
  81. 81. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Can, permit, decide, want, choose, desire, opportunity, commitment Must, need, should, ought, supposed, got to, have to, it’s time, necessary Maybe, probably, deserve, wish, may, might, could, prefer, had better Can’t, doesn’t, won’t, impossible, unable, problem, no intention, choose not to
  82. 82. Negative example Vanessa, The schedule does not allow us to make use of your suggestion. Therefore, I can’t recommend that we move forward with this idea. Regards, Karen
  83. 83. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Affirmative Imperative Tentative
  84. 84. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Can, permit, decide, want, choose, desire, opportunity, commitment Must, need, should, ought, supposed, got to, have to, it’s time, necessary Maybe, probably, deserve, wish, may, might, could, prefer, had better
  85. 85. Identifying The Tone of an Email Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Can, permit, decide, want, choose, desire, opportunity, commitment Must, need, should, ought, supposed, got to, have to, it’s time, necessary Maybe, probably, deserve, wish, may, might, could, prefer, had better
  86. 86. Tentative example Tim, I welcome for your invitation to the exhibition. I might be able to make it - sounds like it could be an interesting event. Thanks, John
  87. 87. When Tone is: Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative  understanding  agreement  rapport
  88. 88. When tone is: Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative Affirmative Imperative Tentative Negative use invitational phrases to ‘open up’ the communication
  89. 89. Strategy #6: Using Invitational Phrases
  90. 90. Invitational phrases  help to change tone  allow your message to be received without resistance  pressure give people the feeling of having a choice Using Invitational Phrases
  91. 91. I invite you to consider . . . Can I suggest that . . . What if we were to . . . Would it be a good idea to . . . Is it possible to . . . How about we . . . If you could choose . . . Using Invitational Phrases
  92. 92. Strategy #7: Recognising Key Words and Language
  93. 93. “When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion” Dale Carnegie Creating agreement via Email
  94. 94. 68% of customers leave because of what they perceive as indifference - they feel; • unappreciated • unimportant • taken-for-granted Creating agreement via Email
  95. 95. People sub-consciously choose words they have a connection to or are comfortable with By mirroring their key words (or Backtracking) you build a subconscious connection that helps to build trust Backtracking is not the same as paraphrasing, which is repeating their message in your words, rather than theirs Recognising key words & language
  96. 96. Recognising key words & phrases Greg, It seems clear to me that the project needs a team behind it who have a vision. We can’t move forward without this. Please focus on these 3 priorities; 1. Customer service 2. Reduced costs 3. Staff training Yours truly, George Sinclair
  97. 97. Use Backtracking in your response George, Thanks for making things clear concerning your vision for the project. I can help the team move forward with all three of those priorities - customer service, reduced costs and staff training. I will call you on Thursday to discuss my thoughts on our first step. Thanks, Greg Johnson
  98. 98. Recognising key words & phrases John, It’s been very frustrating dealing with your customer service team and I’m not satisfied with the answers they been giving. I thought that your customer service would provide great support to the product I bought from you and that you would be there to help me when needed. Yours truly, Jenny Smith
  99. 99. Dear Jenny, I appreciate you making contact about this - my apologies for the frustration you have felt. I can assure you that we are committed to support you with all the help you require. I will investigate the matter personally and make sure that our future responses meet your satisfaction.. Thanks again for bringing this to my attention. John Smith Use Backtracking in your response
  100. 100. “When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion” Dale Carnegie Creating agreement via email
  101. 101. 68% of customers leave because of what they perceive as indifference - they feel; • unappreciated • unimportant • taken-for-granted Creating agreement via email
  102. 102. Creating agreement via email “Always start the conversation by saying something they can agree with.” Graham Richardson The Australian – 23 May 2014
  103. 103. Creating agreement via email “Our conversations either create trust and rapport or destroy it”
  104. 104. The Speed of Trust Stephen Covey Jnr TRUST COST SPEED •High •Low •High When trust is HIGH, communications are easy, fast, effective and cheap
  105. 105. •Low TRUST •High COST •Low SPEED The Speed of Trust Stephen Covey Jnr When trust is LOW, communications are challenging, slow, ineffective and expensive
  106. 106. Recognising Incongruent Language Words that cause a ‘disconnect’ and that break trust and rapport
  107. 107. But “Your hair looks nice but it’s really short now” Recognising Incongruent Language
  108. 108. But “Thanks for filling in the application but . . . ” Recognising Incongruent Language
  109. 109. However “This is a great opportunity, however your service is new and unproven” Recognising Incongruent Language
  110. 110. Yet “Your proposal seems well thought out, yet . . . ” Recognising Incongruent Language
  111. 111. Incongruent words are used to; • mask • smooth over • soften but cause;  imprecision  decreased rapport  growing mistrust The COST of Incongruent Language
  112. 112. How to have your views understood “Tact is the art of making a point without making an enemy”
  113. 113. The Agreement Framework 1 Neutralise I appreciate your . . . I respect your . . . I agree that you . . . I can see that you . . . 2 Calm views sayings feeling thoughts 3 Control and and and and
  114. 114. The Agreement Framework When emotions run high, we can use the agreement framework to break through and overcome conflict
  115. 115. How to have your views understood A simple word that makes all the difference And  Allows validity to both points of view  Allows discussion rather than argument  Allows your view to be heard rather than resisted
  116. 116. How to have your views understood “Jenny, that report looks good and we require it by Friday” And
  117. 117. How to have your views understood “Your proposal is great John and let’s add some more data” And
  118. 118. How to have your views understood “Ben, your sales results are on track and we need further improvement next month” And
  119. 119. Jack: I think your choice of product is wrong Ben: I appreciate your opinion and I see a different opportunity The Agreement Framework Jack: But they’re just not the right company Ben: I respect your position and I feel they are the right fit Jack: It’s going to break down Ben: I agree that from your perspective it could break down and I believe the company and product are solid Jack: Ok, I can see you’re very sure of them
  120. 120. Strategy #4: Structuring Your Emails
  121. 121. Main Point Summary of your main point, request, recommendation or solutions Supporting details Background, reasons explanations, details Any next steps Concise close Sign off Why INVERTED PYRAMID structure work best
  122. 122. Diamond Sequence Preliminary Information Background, reasoning explanations, history Main Point of refusal, request, summary of current situation, conclusion Supportive points, alternatives, options contingencies, Restate desired action Intro preliminary info, history, background, reasoning, explanation Main Point of refusal, request, summary of current situation, conclusion Supporting points, contingencies, alternatives, options Restate the desired action conclusion or outcome
  123. 123. Diamond Sequence Preliminary Information Background, reasoning explanations, history Main Point of refusal, request, summary of current situation, conclusion Supportive points, alternatives, options contingencies, Restate desired action Use this method if you have to; • say "no" to a request • need to ask for something that the reader doesn't want to give • must catch the reader up on the history of a situation.
  124. 124. Writing Concisely Jack: But they’re just not the right company Ben: I respect your position and I feel they are the right fit Jack: It’s going to break down Ben: I agree that from your perspective it could break down and I believe the company and product are solid Jack: Ok, I can see you’re very sure of them Shorten paragraphs • Paragraphs no more than five or six lines long • The longer your message, the harder to read and comprehend quickly. • Short blocks of text are easier to read • Good discipline for streamlining and focussing your thoughts.
  125. 125. Writing Concisely Jack: But they’re just not the right company Ben: I respect your position and I feel they are the right fit Jack: It’s going to break down Ben: I agree that from your perspective it could break down and I believe the company and product are solid Jack: Ok, I can see you’re very sure of them Shorten paragraphs Streamline sentences • Strip every sentence to its core, essential components • Divide long sentences into two sentences • Omit or change unnecessary words or phrases • Rearrange sections • Convert every passive sentence into an active one
  126. 126. Writing Concisely Jack: But they’re just not the right company Ben: I respect your position and I feel they are the right fit Jack: It’s going to break down Ben: I agree that from your perspective it could break down and I believe the company and product are solid Jack: Ok, I can see you’re very sure of them Shorten paragraphs Streamline sentences Reduce number of words • Eliminate every word that serves no purpose • Abbreviate every long word that could be a short word • Use short, direct, action-oriented words
  127. 127. Use the shorter word Writing Concisely
  128. 128. Streamlining exercise A. You have asked the question as to what our fees would be. B. You asked about our fees. Which sentence is more effective?
  129. 129. Streamlining exercise Which sentence is more effective? A. If the computers arrive without any identification as to whom they belong, it can involve quite a bit of time in tracking them down. B. Tracking down computers that are not properly identified can be time consuming
  130. 130. Streamlining exercise Choose a shorter word 1. a great number of many 2. arrive at an approximation approximate 3. at this point in time now 4. come to a realization realise 5. demonstrate a preference prefer 6. despite the fact that despite 7. due to the fact that because 8. since the time when since 9. take under consideration consider 10. until such time as till 11. with the exception of except 12. would appear that seem
  131. 131. Using Active vs Passive Voice I have been alerted that our company . . . To ensure we understand the ISO 9000, managers should send a copy of the guidelines for all staff to sign and return We aim to ensure all users have enough turnaround time Teachers will select the Safety Patrol representatives based on citizenship and academic performance We have improved our quality 1 2 3 4 5
  132. 132. Tactful Impersonal Diplomatic Reasons to use Passive Voice
  133. 133. What can you do next? www.emailtiger.com.au Steuart G. Snooks Email Strategist & Expert Conference presentations E-mail audits/surveys Consulting & advice Keynote speaking Research papers Workshops Blog posts Audio CDs Webinars Seminars Coaching E-books Articles Ideas Tips

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