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TAKE ACTION: www.rotary.org/give
TOO MANY GIRLS SPEND
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COLLECTING WATER.*
*UN Water. (2013). UN-Water factsheet on water and gender,World Water Day 2013.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 3
Rotary Africa is a member of the Rotary World Magazine Press
in this issue...Upfront
4 | From the editor
5 | Message from the RI President
6 | Foundation Chair’s message.
What you should know
7 | 2018 RI Convention
8 | A different kind of Rotary leader
9 | Foundation matters
12 | Inspired to lead
13 | From information to inspiration
16 | A Rotary family story
17 | Inspiring presidents-elect
18 | Service, flexibility and fun
20 | Incredible India
21 | 2018 so far
Projects
22 | Bags of Love
23 | Peace Dignity Hope
27 | Village builders
28 | The heart of a Rotarian
29 | Gathering in George
30 | The wheel winners!
31 | A gift of independence
33 | Birthday fun day
Youth
35 | Claire’s French adventure
Impressive Italy
36 | Club and district youth news
Round up
37 | Club and district news
Recognised
42 | Welcomed and honoured
4 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
Editor	 	 Sarah van Heerden
Administration 	 Sharon Robertson
Chairman	 	 Gerald Sieberhagen
Directors	 	 Greg Cryer
		Andy Gray
		Peter Hugo
		Natty Moodley
		Annemarie Mostert
Publisher	 	 Rotary in Africa
	 	 Reg. No. 71/04840/08
	 	 (incorp.associationnotfor
		gain)
	 	 PBO No: 18/13/13/3091
	 	 RegisteredattheGPOasa
		newspaper
Design & Layout	 Rotary in Africa
Printers	 	 Colour Planet, Pinetown
Advertising	 Sharon Robertson
	 	 Sarah van Heerden
	 	 Tariff card on request at
		www.rotaryafrica.com
Subscriptions 	 Sharon Robertson
		www.rotaryafrica.com 	
		(digital)
Contributions 	 rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za
Distribution 	 Rotary Districts 9210,
		 9211, 9212, 9220, 9350,
		 9370 and 9400
		 (Southern and Eastern
		Africa)
Contact		 Rotary Africa
		 PO Box 563
		Westville
		3630
		South Africa
Telephone	 0027 (31) 267 1848
Fax		 0027 (31) 267 1849
Email		 rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za
Website		 www.rotaryafrica.com
The Rotary Emblem, Rotary International, Rotary,
Rotary Club and Rotarian are trademarks of Rotary
International and are used under licence. The views
expressed herein are not necessarily those of Rotary
Africa,RotaryInternationalorTheRotaryFoundation.
MEET OUR TEAM
From the Editor
SarahSarahLike us on
Facebook
There is nothing worse than arriving at a gathering happy,
energised and full of ideas only to be deflated by what I call,
motivation vampires.
There is nothing wrong with pointing out the short comings of ideas
(constructive criticism) but there is a lot wrong with shooting down ideas
(destructive criticism). So, what is the difference? Constructive criticism
is a positive form of criticism, it does not demotivate individuals, it
highlights an issue but offers a positive suggestion on how to correct the
short comings. Destructive criticism impacts negatively on the person
receiving it. It may insult them, isolate them or worse, demotivate them.
Why is this important?
I listened to a discussion about membership and while it is highly
likely that in our desperation to boost our membership, we are engaging
with the wrong type of people, we also have to look at ourselves and ask
if there is something in the club that is driving members away?
I have noticed that in general, there is far too much destructive
negativity in our day-to-day interactions. People leave these encounters
tense, demotivated and with the proverbial, bad taste in the mouth. An
experience like this at your club is dangerous as it won’t impact on just
one person. There is a good chance that it may impact on two or more
people; everyone who was inspired is deflated. These people start to
dread attending meetings and having to deal with the negativity; they
feel emotionally drained as if a “vampire” had sucked the positive energy
from their beings. Eventually, they walk away and quite possibly, will be
followed by others.
So what can we do to improve the situation?
Why not ask the president or someone close to the negative
individuals to speak to them. It is possible that they don’t realise the
impact of their words and actions. Perhaps if they were made aware
of this, they would adjust accordingly. I also think that instituting a fun
club rule that if someone says something negative, they need to follow
it with a suggestion for improvement or pay a fine to EREY or End Polio
Now. This simple rule will automatically convert destructive criticism into
constructive criticism; it will energise and motivate!
I was fortunate enough to be invited to speak at and report on the
D9370 POETS last month. During one of the tea breaks I heard someone
say, “Why do we need another e-club? We have three in South Africa,
that is more than enough!” I bit my tongue and carried on walking as the
answer, in my view, is extremely clear and supported by the numbers.
The three e-clubs in South Africa have one thing in common, one
thing that the most average clubs dream of: High membership.
I believe, and the data I’ve seen supports this, that e-clubs are one of
the avenues through which Rotary can secure its future. Life is busy and
complicated. People travel a lot more for work today than what they did
20 years ago. The flexibility offered by e-clubs is what attracts members
and keeps them. As far as I understand, our e-cubs meet as a club and
members who live in the same geographical areas also socialise and
undertake projects together as ‘clusters’. They interact, serve and enjoy
fellowship. What is more impressive is what they are achieving.
All this makes me think of something my grandmother used to say: “If
you have nothing nice to say; say nothing!” And if you still choose to say
it, why not say sorry with a donation to End Polio Now?
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 5
IAN RISELEY
President, Rotary International
Message from the
RI PRESIDENT
upfront
Speeches & news from RI President Ian Riseley
www.rotary.org/office-president
Dear Fellow Rotarians,
At the 1990 Rotary International Convention in
Portland, Oregon, then President-Elect Paulo Costa
told the gathered Rotarians, “The hour has come
for Rotary to raise its voice, to claim its leadership
and to rouse all Rotarians to an honourable crusade
to protect our natural resources.” He declared a
Rotary initiative to “Preserve Planet Earth,” asking
Rotarians to make environmental issues part of their
service agenda: to plant trees, to work to keep our air
and water clean and to protect the planet for future
generations.
President Costa asked that one tree be planted for
each of the 1.1 million members that Rotary had at the
time. We Rotarians, as is our wont, did better, planting
nearly 35 million trees by the end of the Rotary year. Many
of those trees are likely still flourishing today, absorbing
carbon from the environment, releasing oxygen, cooling
the air, improving soil quality, providing habitat and food
for birds, animals and insects and yielding a host of other
benefits. Unfortunately, while those trees have kept on
doing good for the environment, Rotary as a whole has
not carried its environmental commitment forward.
That is why, at the start of this year, I followed Paulo
Costa’s example and asked Rotary to plant at least one
tree for every Rotary member. My goal was to achieve
something more than the considerable benefits that those
1.2 million (or more!) trees would themselves bring. It is
my hope that by planting trees, Rotarians will renew their
interest in and attention to an issue that we must put back
on the Rotary agenda: The state of our planet.
Environmental issues are deeply entwined in every
one of our areas of focus and cannot be dismissed as
“not Rotary’s concern”. Pollution is affecting health
across the globe: More than 80 percent of people in
urban areas breathe unsafe air, a number that rises to
98 percent in low and middle-income countries. If current
trends continue, by 2050 the oceans are expected to
contain more plastics by weight than fish. And rising
temperatures are well-documented: Global annual
average temperatures increased by about 2 degrees
F (1.1 degrees C) from 1880 through 2015. That this
change was caused by humans is not a subject of
scientific debate nor is the likelihood of vast economic
and human disruption if the trend continues unchecked.
The need for action is greater than ever and so is our
ability to have a real impact.
As past UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon put it,
“There can be no Plan B, because there is no Planet B.”
Our planet belongs to all of us, to our children and their
children. It is for all of us to protect and for all of us in
Rotary to make a difference.
6 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the
ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in
particular, to encourage and foster:
First. The development of acquaintance as an
opportunity for service;
Second. High ethical standards in business and
professions; the recognition of the worthiness of
all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each
Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve
society;
Third. The application of the ideal of service in each
Rotarian’s personal, business, and community
life;
Fourth. The advancement of international
understanding, goodwill, and peace through a
world fellowship of business and professional
persons united in the ideal of service.
Of the things we think, say or do:
1) Is it the TRUTH?
2) Is it FAIR to all concerned?
3) Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?
4) Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?
Object of Rotary
The Four-Way Test
what you should know
Paul Netzel
FOUNDATION TRUSTEE CHAIR
FOUNDATION TRUSTEE CHAIR’S
MESSAGE
Learn more about Rotary at:
www.rotary.org
ROTARY
Members:
1 230 399
Clubs:
35 784
ROTARACT
Members:
249 757
Clubs:
10 859
INTERACT
Members:
512 417
Clubs:
22 279
RCC
Members:
223 260
Corps:
9 707
ROTARY
AT A
GLANCEAs of 30 November
What are your challenges? I want
to hear your thoughts. Email me at
paul.netzel@rotary.org.
The new grant model comes up frequently during
my visits with Rotarians throughout the world. It is
always disappointing to learn that a club or district
lacks interest in participating in Global Grants.
What are the reasons I hear most often? Global
Grants are too complicated. They take too much work,
require too much money. Or the available pool of DDFs
(District Designated Funds) may not be large enough to
meet the demand.
Yet the numbers tell a story that can be perceived
as positive. During 2016/17 (The Rotary Foundation’s
centennial year), 1 260 Global Grants were awarded,
an eight percent increase over the previous year. The
figures for the first half of this Rotary year are running
ahead of last year.
Your ongoing feedback and suggestions have helped
make a difference. Numerous upgrades have been made
to the Global Grant online application process. The time
it takes to process Global Grants has been significantly
reduced. In 2016/17, the average was 129 business
days from the time a grant application was submitted to
the first payment. The average was 107 business days
for 2017/18 as of 1 February.
IfyourclubhasnotparticipatedinaGlobalGrant,Iurge
you to take another look at the resources now available.
Start by looking at the newly redesigned Rotary Grant
Centre at grants.rotary.org. Explore the comprehensive
resources linked in the right-hand column.
Our Foundation’s outstanding grants staff wants
to help, drawing on its expertise and TRF’s collective
experience. Establish a relationship with the staff contact
for your project district. The Rotary Support Centre can
provide contact information within one business day
(rotarysupportcenter@rotary.org).
The Rotary Foundation’s Cadre of Technical Advisers
is a group of volunteer Rotarians who also provide
technical expertise and advice to Rotarians planning and
carrying out Rotary projects. If you would like to receive
guidance on project planning early in the process,
contact cadre@rotary.org.
A critical role of the Trustees is to listen. Rotary
members have spoken. Together we are a powerful
force of volunteers who identify needs and respond with
generosity, creativity and passion. Rotary grants provide
us with a unique opportunity to bring ideas to reality and
to make a lasting impact, whether locally or globally.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 7
TRANSIT OPTIONS
2018 RI Convention
Remember us in your will.
salvationarmy.org.za/legacies-bequests
After you land at Pearson International Airport
for the 2018 Rotary International Convention in
Toronto, from 23 to 27 June, there are many ways
to get into the city.
You could take a taxi or airport limo. If you want to
tour the area on your own, you could rent a car. But you
could also save money by taking the express light rail
train or public transportation.
The Union Pearson Express departs the airport for
Union Station every 15 minutes. A round-trip ticket for
the 25-minute ride is CA$24.70; seniors pay half that
amount.
You might instead take one of the buses run by the
Toronto Transit Commission (commonly known as the
TTC). The 192 Airport Rocket will get you downtown in
45 minutes.
The TTC includes a vast system of buses, subways,
and streetcars. You can use all these services during a
one-way trip as long as you have a paper transfer. Each
trip is roughly $3, less for seniors and students, and can
be paid for through cash or token.
If you plan on exploring Toronto during the
convention, you can buy a pass that provides unlimited
travel around the city for a day ($12.50) or a week
($43.75, seniors $34.75). – Randi Druzin
To register, go to riconvention.org.
8 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
A DIFFERENT KIND
PDG Andrew Jaeger, Rotary Coordinator, Zone 20A South
The modern day Rotarian cannot be lured into
our organisation with promises of quick and easy
solutionsandaperfectworld.Thechallengesweface
in our beloved organisation are multidimensional.
They are complex and demanding of our cognitive,
emotional and social intelligences. 
In addition, modern day life is fast-paced with
relentless waves of change. In such a world, the quality
of what we offer and our progress are more dependent
on the ability to respond effectively to situations than it
is to comply with rules, regulations and standards. 
Simplyput:Inapost-modernworldbeyondblueprints,
formulas, textbook solutions and the dominance of
reason, Rotary leaders must have deep intuitive insight,
grounded in a solid foundation of principles and values.
Equally important is the regard for relationships of all
kinds and knowing how to preserve them.
 
Developing leaders
Great leaders know how to balance the necessary
regulations of good governance and accountability, with
the creativity and skill to optimise opportunities that
unlock their full potential.
This has a significant impact on the type of leader
that is needed in Rotary (as in business) as well as the
methodology which is used to develop such leaders. The
requirement to respond quickly but with a long-term and
holistic view, demands leadership skill and ability at all
levels of an organisation. Therefore, it needs to be the
vision of leaders with the highest responsibility in an
organisation to strategically build leadership among all
of its members.
The modern leader is characterised more by
his insight, resolve and ability to ‘read’ people and
situations than by his knowledge or charisma.  The
development of a leader is therefore neither determined
by nature (personality) nor by study or classroom
training. The focus in developing a leader needs to be
more experiential, learning from feedback and reflecting
on inner and team dynamics.
Developing and building leaders should not be seen
or treated as an event. Instead the development of
leaders is a process which is typically not classroom
training, but rather hands-on coaching and facilitated
self-reflection. 
Developing good leaders is also not a theoretical
application which is done in isolation; it is a continuous
set of practical experiences which is applied in the
context of teamwork. Such development of leaders must
be done in a responsive manner which meets specific
and immediate challenges - it is intensive, personal and
must be outcomes focused.
 
Outcomes
A leadership development initiative will only have
real and lasting outcomes if the process ensures the
internalisation of new knowledge with regards to leading
oneself, leading change and leading others. The leader
functions with new insight in what is more effective and
beneficial for the whole. Growth as a leader demands
ongoing introspection, reflection, listening to and
learning from feedback.
There are three essential questions that leaders
should be able to answer convincingly. They are:
How will you model excellence to us?  
In other words, what is your example of
character, courage, integrity and personal
mastery?
Where will you take us?
In other words, what do you see as our
destination and how we will get there?
How will you engage us?
In other words, how will you create an
environment of inspiration, care, growth and
discipline for all of us?
Lifelong learning
Real leaders are not those who have had one
success story and then try to repeat it over and over
again with nothing new to add. They are not those who
sit back, fold their arms and declare that there is nothing
left for them to learn - nothing of importance at least.
To the contrary, real leaders are those people who
over a lifetime were able to adjust and find new ways of
applying themselves, new wisdom to go forward with,
as well as new inspiration to overcome the challenges.
Indeed, as JF Kennedy realised, leadership and
learning are indispensable to each other. Not only is
the ‘know-it-all’ attitude a sign of flawed leadership
but learning in itself is a process of leading. The word
‘leadership’ implies the risk of going first. It implies new
territory. It implies change. It implies learning.
of Rotary leader
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 9
MATERNAL & CHILD HEALTH
Foundation matters
By PDG Patrick Coleman: Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Zone 20A South
He who saves a single life
saves the entire world
We have entered the final quarter of the Rotary year!
Incoming district governors have been trained and
are in the process of training their incoming club
presidents and district teams.
There is both the excitement of Making a Difference
in finishing this Rotary year and the building anticipation
of Be the Inspiration as the new Rotary year is about
to begin.
As we look at our present goals and the
accomplishment of them, we evaluate our current
situation and remind ourselves that our Rotary gift is
Making a Difference in the lives of women and children
around the world!
Did you know that your gift to the Rotary Foundation
makes high-quality health care available to vulnerable
mothers and children so that they can live longer and
grow stronger?
Through our participation we expand access to
quality care, so mothers and children everywhere can
have the same opportunities for a healthy future. An
estimated 5.9 million children under the age of five die
each year because of malnutrition, inadequate health
care and poor sanitation; all these deaths can be
prevented!
Rotary provides education, immunisations, birth
kits and mobile health clinics. Women are taught how
to prevent mother-to-infant HIV transmission, how to
breastfeed and how to protect themselves and their
children from disease.
Rotary programmes improve women’s access to
skilled health personnel: doctors, nurses, midwives or
community health care workers.
Rotary members distribute clean birth kits and train
health workers in safe delivery of babies.
Rotary members promote immunisations and regular
checkups. They also distribute insecticide-treated bed
nets.
Clubs in Japan and Brazil used a Rotary Foundation
Global Grant to equip a hospital with lifesaving neonatal
equipment.
In the mountains of Poland, 26 children traumatised
by violence got a chance to be kids again at a Rotary
camp where psychologists mixed escape and therapy.
Alittle closer to home: Through the use of technology,
doctors are bringing health care to women and children
living in rural Nigeria (see more about this project at:
https://bit.ly/2DPV0pB).
Below is a brief overview of our Rotary Foundation
giving in Zone 20A (sub Saharan Africa) this year. I
know that many clubs wait until the end of the year to
submit their contribution to The Rotary Foundation in
order to save on bank fees (our club does this, too).
This is simply a reminder that the year is coming to an
end and to please be ready to Make a Difference by
sending your gift on time.
During this particular time of the year, it is appropriate
to consider what the Jewish Talmud says: He who saves
a single life saves the entire world.
Our gifts to The Rotary Foundation do, in fact,
contribute to “saving the world” one life at a time!
10 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
The Comrades Marathon Association’s six official
charities for the next three years are The Community
Chests of Durban and Pietermaritzburg, the Wildlands
Conservation Trust, World Vision South Africa,
Childhood Cancer Foundation of SA (CHOC), Hillcrest
AIDS Foundation Trust and the Hospice Palliative Care
Association.
These organisations are no strangers to Rotary as
many of our Rotary clubs regularly support them and
have undertaken projects to assist them. Rotarians who
have registered to run the 2018 Comrades Marathon
can sign up to Race4Charity and collect sponsorship in
support of the Amabeadibeadi Charity Drive. It began in
1996 and over the past 10 years, the official Comrades
charities have benefitted in excess of R30-million
through the generosity of runners, sponsors, supporters
and the general public.
Childhood Cancer Foundation (CHOC) supports
children with cancer and life-threatening blood
disorders and their families, improving early detection
and facilitating effective treatment, by providing
transport and accommodation near treatment facilities,
financial support to low-income families, care giving,
nutritional support, children’s play/rest and ward décor,
toys, psychological and emotional support as well as
bereavement programmes and funeral costs.
The Community Chests of Durban and
Pietermaritzburg distribute funding to 141 carefully
screened, selected and monitored social welfare
organisations, giving priority to early childhood
development, informal settlements, rural and peri-
urban areas and a focus on the poorest of the poor,
between the cities of Durban and Pietermaritzburg.
Hillcrest AIDS Centre Trust serves people impacted
by HIV/AIDS by providing unconditional love and
hope through practical and sustainable means. These
include free medical care to patients in advanced
stages of AIDS in a dignified caring environment,
patient follow-up and adherence programmes,
home-based care, an outpatient clinic, screening and
primary healthcare. It also offers counselling, in-school
prevention and education programmes.
Hospice Palliative Care Association (HPCA)
consists of 156 member hospices scattered
throughout South Africa providing holistic quality and
compassionate care to any person of any age with
any life-limiting illness, in a variety of settings including
hospice in-patient facilities, hospitals, hospice day-
care facilities, community health facilities and patients
own home care. Hospices provide dignity in death to
patients and compassionate support to their loved
ones.
Wildlands Conservation Trust focuses on working
towards a sustainable future for all, within the context
of an increasingly fragile planet and the impact of
climate change.
Its philosophy is that community-based involvement
and capacity-building and upliftment projects are
key to saving the planet. Innovative projects include
Trees for Life, Recycling for Life, Blue Fund, Ocean
Stewards, Ubuntu Earth, Whale Time, Blood Lions,
Project Rhino and many others.
World Vision is a faith-based, global relief,
development and advocacy organisation dedicated to
working with children, their families and communities
to overcome poverty and injustice.
Its main focus is on child welfare health, education
and child protection. Currently it runs 11 development
programmes in six provinces that benefit 43 000
registered children.
Advertorial
Comrades charities focus on
Have you entered to run? Did you know you can run and raise funds for a worthy cause?
Did you #Race4Charity ?
If you have run the Comrades Marathon and been part of the
Race4Charity, please email us your story and it may be included in
this feature.
Send your story and running photo to rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za.
Remember to include Race4Charity in the subject line
CALLING ALL ROTARIANS
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 11
Telephone 0861 100 963 email: info@championchip.co.za
Web Site: www.championchip.co.za
Please contact Jacqui or Colin and quote the reference:
RA17001 if you represent a Rotary organized event to
receive your Rotary discount on select services.
Race Number Production
Live Race Results and Tracking
Event Promotion
FREE UltimateLITE Results APP
FREE Online entry to Events
Event management solutions
12 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
District governors-elect got their first look at the
2018/19 presidential theme, Be the Inspiration, at
the International Assembly, the annual training
event held in San Diego in January. RI President-
elect Barry Rassin urged the audience to build a
stronger organisation by inspiring young people
and spreading the word in their communities about
the work Rotary does. “I will ask you to inspire with
your words and with your deeds,” he said, “doing
what we need to do today to build a Rotary that will
be stronger tomorrow, stronger when we leave it
than it was when we came.”
One source of inspiration, Rassin said, has been
Rotary’s work to eradicate polio. He described the
incredible progress made in the past three decades:
In 1988, an estimated 350 000 people were paralysed
by the wild poliovirus. In 2017, just 22 cases were
reported. “We are at an incredibly exciting time for polio
eradication,” he said, “a point at which each new case
of polio could very well be the last.”
He emphasised that even when that last case of
polio is recorded, the work won’t be finished; Rotarians
must continue to dedicate themselves to immunisation
and to disease surveillance programmes. “Polio won’t
be over until the certifying commission says it’s over –
when not one poliovirus has been found in a river, in a
sewer or in a paralysed child, for at least three years,”
he said. “Until then, we have to keep doing everything
we’re doing now.”
In recent years, Rotary has focused on sustainability
in its humanitarian work. Now, Rassin said, Rotarians
must acknowledge some hard realities about pollution,
environmental degradation and climate change. He
noted that 80 percent of his own country, the Bahamas,
is within one meter of sea level. With sea levels
projected to rise as much as 2 meters by 2100, he said,
“my country is going to be gone in 50 years, along with
most of the islands in the Caribbean and coastal cities
and low-lying areas all over the world.”
Rassin urged the leaders to view all of Rotary’s
service as part of a whole. This means, he said, that the
incoming governors must be an inspiration not only to
the clubs in their districts, but also to their communities.
“We want the good we do to last. We want to make the
world a better place. Not just here, not just for us but
everywhere, for everyone, for generations.”
to leadINSPIRED
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 13
All passionate and engaged Rotarians know that we
are part of an extraordinary global organisation. We
drive phenomenal projects and positively impact
society. Only those who are familiar with our good
works are aware of our powerful brand and how we
can make a difference.
Yet, as good as we feel we are, we do face threats.
For example, the amount of effort to attract passionate
members is tough as we face ever increasing
competition for time and resources. There are many
media savvy organisations who know how to tug heart
strings and can raise lots of money for single focussed,
short-term campaigns. We also live in a world of
distraction, where high tech, digitally connected people
have incredibly short attention spans.
Rotary, in general is about long-term, sustainable
impact.As an example, we have made such a significant
contribution to the eradication of polio but the public has
no knowledge of this. Polio is not seen as an issue by
the media and social influencers, as the disease has
faded from the memory of most adults and children are
oblivious of its terrible impact. More modern scourges
tend to make the headlines.
Rotary’s strength of autonomous clubs making
their own decisions about what projects to work on
paradoxically weakens our capacity to grab headlines
and attention. Individual club efforts are seen and
forgotten with a swipe of a thumb across a Facebook
wall.
So how can we attract the attention that we need?
In D9350, we believe that by collating the work of all the
clubs in a district, we gather the information to really
gain awareness. Rotarians do the work but fail to tell the
stunning story of what we have done and how we have
impacted society.
The effort has numerous other benefits; we can
produce reports for different audiences. Social media
messaging with punchy stats should raise awareness.
Local and provincial government and corporates
with significant CSI budgets can get detailed reports
that show Rotary’s influence, impact and skill set.
Individual club efforts aren’t seen as newsworthy
but when collated to district level we provide a good
news story. Media focus is therefore enhanced. Each
club also produces its own mini report and can use
this as a tool to assess their effectiveness as well as a
marketing tool to show potential members and donors.
We also produce a district-wide project database and
its objective is to enhance collaboration between clubs
working in similar focus areas or neighbourhoods.
D9350 has been working on producing a district
report for the past four years. The uptake in the first
few years was disappointing but each district governor
was in favour of the concept and actively supported
the collection of data. Clubs were somewhat sceptical
about the benefits and concerned about the extra work
required.
Each year, we improved our communication and our
data collection tool. Some clubs don’t like the idea of
submitting some data to RI for presidential citations and
other data to district. It also took a while for the district
to incorporate the collection of data into its strategic
thinking. Data collection was initially a one-person job
but now plays a significant part of the district public
image’s focus.
To date, we have collected the information from clubs
retrospectively. In August of each year, we ask clubs to
provide us with information about projects carried out in
the previous Rotary year. We provide a brief report back
at the mini-conference in October and then work on the
report which can be distributed widely.
2016/17 D9350 results.
•	 For the first time over 50 percent of clubs reported
their project activity.
•	 Rotarians were involved in 497 separate projects,
•	 R32.4m was spent on projects for our various
beneficiaries.
•	 72 000 beneficiaries were reached by these projects.
•	 Rotarians sit on the boards of trustees of 47 NGOs.
•	 Rotarians did over 12 400 hours of volunteer time.
•	 Over 90 percent of the beneficiaries are in the district.
Some projects cover beneficiaries in other areas of
Southern Africa.
•	 Rotarians partnered with 116 organisations to develop
and implement projects.
•	 Clubs from most areas of our district reported and
provided a broad understanding of activity throughout
the huge district that includes the Western Cape, parts
of the Northern Cape, Namibia and Angola.
What are we doing with these results?
This is the first year that we have a significant set of
results. We publicised the results at the District’s mini-
conference in October.
We started marketing how good we are by launching
a social media campaign to coincide with Rotary’s 113th
birthday on 23rd February 2018. This campaign ran
over four weeks.
The first part of the campaign included six posters
which made up an infographic. Over the following three
weeks, club projects which represented some aspect
of Rotary were shown. Brief summaries have been
written about some of the projects and can be found
From information
to inspiration
District 9350’s Janey Ball and Tony Davidson are heading up a project that’s
using project data to create a buzz!
14 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
at www.rotarydpi9350.com/blog and on Facebook
(Rotary International D9350). We are currently planning
a more traditional marketing approach, using radio and
community newspapers, a press release will be sent
to the media in our district with geographically relevant
project reports to highlight how Rotary has made a
difference in that community.
What lessons have we learnt?
•	Persistence is necessary. Convincing clubs that
reporting and collating project information is
beneficial to all concerned has taken four years.
•	We have become more strategic with our marketing
to clubs. Our message, information to inspiration,
struck a chord.
•	DG and district leadership have bought into
the concept and have been very supportive.
The AGs supported the project and helped the
technologically-challenged Rotarians submit
reports on spreadsheets.
•	Clubs which have been submitting reports every
year, geared themselves up to report and found the
process quick and simple.
•	The data project falls under the district public image
portfolio and is seen as a crucial part of the DPI’s
responsibility and is a key source of DPI material.
•	We are learning at each stage of the process.
What next?
Businesses realise that the intelligent use of data is
critical to the success of an organisation. D9350 has
started to see that this exercise has so many benefits
and we will continue to collate reports on our projects.
Rotary International also realised how powerful
club data can be. We are aligning their requirements to
those in our collection forms so that data only needs to
be collected once.
To date, the projects have been reported
retrospectively after the end of a Rotary year. Less
organised clubs battle to collate their information.
Currently, we are reporting on projects with a lag of
at least eight months. Annual reports should be made
timeously and released as soon as possible after the
year end.
We have also been using very wide Excel
spreadsheets, which are clumsy, but the data collection
process is transforming to become more user friendly
and current. Data can now be collected on a simpler
to use Google form. These forms are available for
download and can be filled out as soon as a project
is completed. Once the transformation process is
complete, the project information will become current.
Our vision is to create a Southern African Rotary
report, covering the activities of all clubs. From this, we
can also create national reports.
Imagine how inspirational our message to South
Africans would be when we presented the country with
a national overview of how Rotary serves the people?
Should other districts want to join us in creating
inspiration from information, please don’t hesitate
to contact Janey Ball (janey@iafrica.com) or Tony
Davidson (tondav@iafrica.com).
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 15
Company Notice
Rotary in Africa
Reg. No.1971/004840/07
Notice to Members*
Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of Rotary in Africa will be
held at the company offices situated at 2 Prische House, 14 Church Road, Westville 3630,
KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
on Friday 11th May 2018, at 09h00.
AGENDA
1. Call to order and announcements.
2. Confirmation of the minutes of the last Annual General Meeting held on Friday 19th
May 2017.
3. Chairman’s report.
4. Editor’s report.
5. Treasurer’s report and submission of the annual financial accounts for the year
ending 31st
December 2017.
6. Appointment of auditors.
7. Election of up to 3 directors to serve on the Board.
In terms of the company’s Articles of Association the following directors are due to
retire from the Board: Andy Gray, Gregory Cryer and Natty Moodley. Being eligible,
Andy Gray, Gregory Cryer and Natty Moodley will be available for election together
with any other nominations received by close of business 04th
May 2018.
Nominations must be emailed directly to Rotary in Africa at
rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za
8. To consider or transact any other business pertinent to an Annual General Meeting.
*All current, immediate incoming and past Governors of Rotary Districts 9200, 9210,
9211, 9212, 9220, 9250, 9270, 9300, 9320, 9350, 9370 and 9400 are ex officio members
of Rotary in Africa.
A member may appoint a proxy to attend and vote on their behalf, provided such
appointment is advised to the Secretary at the offices of the company at least 48 hours
before the meeting.
Natty Moodley - Secretary. 20 March 2018
16 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
Lillian Hopkins, the mother of Chester Woodhall
of the Rotary Club of East London (D9370), has
been attending most of his club’s weekly lunch
meetings this year.
Lillian celebrated her 100th birthday on 15
November 2017 and received a telegram of
congratulations from Queen Elizabeth II, as well as
a letter from the British Parliament.
She has been a member of the Rotary Family
since 1990 when, during a prolonged stay in the
UK, Chester was instrumental in the charter of the
Rotary Club of Wylde Green (D1060, England).
Lillian’s husband and other son joined the
new club and Lillian became a charter member
of the Inner Wheel Club of Wylde Green. She is
also a past president of the club. For the last 20
years, Lillian has led her club to allocate funding
to purchase goods needed by various non-profit
organisations in East London.
She is considered a valued member of the
Inner Wheel club and last year, the Rotary Club of
Wylde Green recognised Lillian as a Paul Harris
Fellow while the Inner Wheel club awarded her the
Margaretta Golding award.
The telegram of congratulations that Lillian Hopkins (below) received from Queen Elizabeth II on her 100th birthday.
A ROTARY
FAMILY STORY
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 17
District 9210 enjoyed a record attendance of 74
Rotarians at this year’s Presidents-Elect Training
Seminar (PETS) that was held at the Rotary Centre
in Harare.
The training, organised by the district training team
and assistant governors, was ably led by District
Governor-Elect Hutch Mthinda and District Trainer-
Elect Marshal Chilenga.
Mthinda opened the session by welcoming the
Rotarians and unveiled the RI Theme for 2018/19, his
district goals and the presidential citation. In addition to
the three-hour grant management seminar, participants
were taken though the use of on-line tools, strategic
planning, public image, goal setting, membership and
youth programmes.
Rotarians were encouraged to network at club
meetings and events and promote Rotary’s core
values. Feedback from participants was that they felt
more inspired to do good in the coming year. They also
said they were ready to Be the Inspiration and share
the inspiration to make a positive difference with other
Rotarians and their communities.
Members of the Rotary Club of Chitungwiza (D9210) attended
and thoroughly enjoyed the presidents-elect training in
Harare. With DGE Hutch Mthinda are Agnes Magunje and
Rose Peters.
INSPIRING PRESIDENTS-ELECT
18 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
Nearly 200 Rotarians attended the District 9370 AG
and POETS training at St Augustine’s Priory and
Conference Centre and were hosted by the Rotary
Club of Ladybrand.
After DGE Gianna Doubell welcomed the assistant
governors (AGs) and introduced her team for the
upcoming year, she said she considers Be the
Inspiration to be a challenge to bring a new energy to
the district and Rotary. “Like the energy of the waves
can make a tremendous difference and huge impact to
the shape of a coast line, we can do the same to our
communities.”
She asked the AGs, the majority of whom were first-
timers, to encourage presidents to look out for “new
blood and bring them up through Rotary.” She reminded
the AGs of the importance of Rotarians connecting with
Rotarians and not only those in their clubs. “We are part
of a global organisation and we all need to be part of the
bigger picture. It’s time to renew the energy in Rotary.”
Days two and three were dedicated to president-elect
and club officer training. A number of the clubs arrived
with three or more delegates and some with as many as
five. During the tea breaks there was much discussion
on how the training would benefit all Rotarians, not just
those taking office.
The training format mirrored that of the Rotary
Leadership Institute (RLI) training. Delegates were
divided into breakaway groups of about 30 and allocated
a training room. They sat at tables of six to discuss the
topics and an individual was chosen to report back to
the room. The varying opinions were then discussed as
a room.
At Friday night’s dinner, a surprise speaker was
introduced to the Rotarians: Andre du Toit, who is also
knownasTheBigPositiveGuy.Hismessageofoptimism
was well received as he pointed out to delegates how
negative thinking impacts on the interpretation of a
situation and therefore, rational decision making. In a
nutshell, looking for the positive in the situation makes
you happier and open to smarter decision making!
The next day started with the group breakaways
and then moved to the hall for district business. Doubell
asked Rotarians to remember that she is a district
resource. “I have been trained; I have all the latest
information. If you have questions, ask me! I have the
answers. I want you to use my club visits to learn, to
ask questions, to get answers. That is what is important.
Rather than doing formal presentations and dinners,
let’s do something different, like a beach breakfast.”
District 9370 invited Rotary Africa to attend and report on its 2018
AG/POETS training... What a weekend of energising inspiration!
By Sarah van Heerden
Service, flexibility and fun
Karen de Jager, Greg Cryer, Gianna Doubell and Bruce and Pippa Steele-Gray tallying the “loot” collected from the
delegates for PolioPlus and the venue staff tips.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 19
After an interesting series of
presentations, including the introduction
of next year’s district conference and
Rotary International Convention, the
formalities of the weekend concluded
and delegates left to prepare for the
Caribbean theme dinner.
That night, beach bums, pirates and
island folk arrived to the rhythmic beats
of a marimba band and found the venue
festively decorated to theme. A few
surprises were in store, such as Gavin
Jepson in his hula skirt.
The next morning, the delegates left
to return home inspired and ready to
energise their clubs with the message of
flexibility, positivity and connectivity.
DGE Gianna Doubell with one of the discussion groups at the assistant
governor training .
Island styling! Members of the Rotary E-Club of South Africa
One, Irene Kotze and Gerald Sieberhagen, the chairman of Rotary
Africa, enjoying the Caribbean festivities.
Gianna Doubell asked Rotarians to “Ask me!” during her year.Angelique Timm and Gavin Jepson
Want Rotary Africa to cover your event?
Email rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za to find out how!
The future is looking fab! DGE Gianna Doubell, DGN
Jaco Stander, and DGND Maud Boikanyo.
20 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
A friendship exchange between Rotarians
from D9400 and D3141 (Mumbai) was
more of a magic carpet ride than a simple
visit.
The group, consisting of Carol Allais,
Desire and Johan du Toit, Graham and
Jenny Finbow, Liz Mackintosh, Cheryl
Reum and Morris and Gill McClurg, spent
nine unforgettable days seeing the sights of
Mumbai and Aurangabad.
Highlights of the trip included visits to the
Hanging Garden, the Gateway of India, The
Prince of Wales Museum, as well as various
temples and churches. The group celebrated
Holi at Vrindavan Farms, were treated to a
meditation session at the Vipassana Pagoda
and lunch at the prestigious Cricket Club of
India.
In Aurangabad the Rotarians visited the
indescribable Ellora andAjanta caves (Hindu,
Jain and Buddhist shrines, monasteries and
temples carved into the mountainside dating
back to 200 BC) and Bibi-Ka-Maqbara (the
mini Taj Mahal that was built by Aurangzeb,
the son of Shah Jehan). A group from D3141
will be visiting D9400 in October.
INCREDIBLE
INDIA
The group with some of their hosts at the
Hanging Gardens.
Inside a sari shop.
The head of the Buddha at the entrance of the Prince of Wales Museum.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 21
By Richard Brooks, Zone 20a (South) End Polio
Now Zone Coordinator
At the 2017 Governors’ Council of Southern Africa
(COSA) meeting, a resolution was passed to support
an initiative to arrange for volunteers to participate
in Nigeria’s anti polio campaign.
DG Adewale Ogunbadejo (D9110, Nigeria)
welcomed the support of the COSA resolution to
participate in Nigerian National Immunisation Days. The
2018 campaign will take place from 13 to 16 October
(in the 18 northern states of Nigeria). Interested people
may email me at richardbrooks149@hotmail.com.
Rotary International set a goal to encourage all
districts to give 20 percent of their DDF to PolioPlus.
The goal for 2017/18 for the COSA districts was $91 584
and as at 16 February, the target had been exceeded
and the COSA districts had given a total of $99 232.
We have nearly eliminated polio. In 2017, there were
only 22 reported cases of polio, eight from Pakistan and
14 from Afghanistan. The year before that, there were
only 37 reported cases.
The good news for Africa is that there were no cases
reported in Nigeria since 2016!
I need to emphasise that there is no room for
complacency. During their national immunisation
days, Pakistan plans to vaccinate 37 million children
and Nigeria 26 million. Rotary, together with its global
partners such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
play a pivotal role in funding this campaign.
Another successful delivery of polio vaccines to an outlying area in Nigeria.
2018 SO FARAND IT’S LOOKING GREAT!
Afghanistan
06Reported Cases
2015: 20
2016: 13
2017: 14
Pakistan
00Reported Cases
2015: 54
2016: 20
2017: 08
Nigeria
00Reported Cases
2015: 00
2016: 04
2017: 00
22 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
For far too many women in Malawi, there is
very little to smile and get excited about while
pregnant – poverty, disease, natural disasters
and food insecurity make the thought of
parenthood stressful.
Coupled with the countries fast-growing
population (51 percent, 6.8 million people, of the
Malawian population are children), limited arable
land and the high incidence of Malaria, women and
children are becoming more vulnerable as their
ability to recover from these unrelenting risks and
shocks decreases.
While the situation is dire, there is reason for
hope as well, as the prospects for child survival
have improved over the past few years. Prudent
economic management, stable macroeconomic
conditions and increasing agricultural production
have helped reduce poverty and hunger, while
the country’s HIV prevalence rate seems to have
stabilised at 12 percent.
The Rotary Club of Limbe (D9210) decided to
bring smiles to the faces of expectant mothers and
came up with the idea of Bags of Love. The club
shared its idea with Leeds Grammar School in the
United Kingdom and soon knitting needles were
clicking away as Leeds residents made clothes for
new born babies.
These were packed into gift bags and given
to mothers in maternity wards at the government
hospitals around Blantyre.
BAGS OF LOVEBy Mohamed Tayub
Peace
Dignity
Hope
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 23
24 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
The idea of creating peace
and a better life for the
Khomani San may have
seemed overly ambitious,
but the members of the
Rotary Clubs of Helderberg
Sunrise, Upington (D9350)
and Northcliff (D 9400), as
well as those from 50 clubs
in District 1800 (Germany),
were certain it was possible.
Life has never been easy for the Khomani
San; there’s a long history of neglect, abuse
and violation. Over thousands of years, their
ancestors were pushed south and displaced by
migrating people from further north in Africa.
When the European settlers arrived, the San
clans in South Africa and Namibia were further
disseminated by appalling genocidal activities.
They were regarded as vermin and hunted; the last
permit to hunt a Bushman was issued in 1927.
As their ancestral DNA markers date as far back
as 40 000 years, the Khomani San constitute an
important component of the few surviving aboriginal
South African San.
Plagued by poverty and a number of socio-
economic issues, they were described by the South
African Human Rights Commission (Inquiry into
Human Rights Violations in the Khomani San report,
2004) as “A community fast losing hope, which
often lacked the means and the ability to function
and survive in a world so very different from that to
which it is accustomed. We also found, at various
levels, a sad story of neglect and of indifference.”
The Khomani San – Living in Peace project was
developed to change this. It began in the 2013/14
Rotary year when DG Wernt Brewitz (D1800)
decided he wanted to undertake a project in
Southern Africa that embodied the theme of Peace
Through Service. With Dr Carl-Heinz Duisberg’s
help, then-president of Helderberg Sunrise
(2013/14), and the Peace Parks Foundation (PPF),
the project was born.
Rotarians designed this project to give the
Khomani San a chance to live in peace, freedom,
dignity and economic independence while retaining
their traditional identity. To ensure sustainability,
four sub-projects were designed with them and not
for them.
There are many buzz words surrounding this
project but how do they translate into positive
change for the Khomani San people who have been
so greatly marginalised and neglected?
Simply put, the four sub-projects contained within
this project were designed to help the Khomani San
help themselves develop as a community.
Khomani tracker Am Am explaining spurs to tourists.
Sunset at Erin Game Ranch.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 25
The Imbewu Camp in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park where the camps and veldskool workshops are held.
The first sub-project, Khomani San Council capacity
building, helped the San committees improve their
problem solving, induce individual responsibility skills
and included decision making and management skill
development.
The second, the development and management of
the parks and farms, allowed for the people to follow
a lifestyle that suits them and which preserves and
monetises their culture. A commercial hunting package,
using their traditional hunting methods, was designed
for tourists and provided a unique attraction that was
not offered elsewhere.
The third sub-project, the eco-tourism programme,
dealt with the development of two eco-camps in the
desert landscape and the training of Khomani San to
become guides who can pass on indigenous knowledge
and their application to tourists.
The fourth sub-project was the Veldschool and
Imbewu programme. Veldschool is aimed at facilitating
the intergenerational transfer of indigenous knowledge
while reconnecting community members with ancestral
land in the !Ae !Hai Heritage Park. Imbewu enables
Khomani San elders to access their ancestral land to
enjoy nature while getting closer to the “veld” as their
ancestors of long time ago used to do.
When asked if the project had made a difference
to the Khomani San, Terance Fife, administrator of
the Khomani San Community Property Association,
explained: “The farm Erin is well on its way to being
developed as a business that can employ local people.
The staff employed through the project and at Erin farm
now have regular income and are in a structured work
environment.”
He added, “The heritage, culture and language of
PDG Francis Callard (D9400) and PDG Wernt Brewitz at the
cultural training centre during a visit to the park last year.
26 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
the Khomani San have been sustained as there are
now various programmes to ensure that the knowledge
is passed on to future generations.”
To fund the project, Wernt mobilised 50 Rotary clubs
from D1800 to raise $64 935 while three clubs in South
Africa (Helderberg Sunrise, Northcliff and Upington)
raised $5 127.
The three districts, D9350, D9400 and D1800, each
contributed $42 468. Once the Global Grant application
was approved, The Rotary Foundation provided $78
355 to the project.
Through its Ministry for Economic Cooperation and
Development (BMZ), the German Government lent its
support and donated $572 727, which brought the total
funding to $763 637.
“The support of the international partner club, the
Rotary Club of Nienburg-Neustadt, and the members
of its project committee, who gave advice, guidance
and visited the project on a yearly basis, has been
awesome,” said Duisberg.
Last year, Rotarians visited the Khomani San and delivered
a donation of knitted jerseys, beanies, scarves, TOMS
Shoes and Msterio dolls. This initiative was made possible
by Sesego Cares in partnership with the Rotary E-Club of
Southern Africa D9400 and Msterio. The doll programme
works to connect children by showing that giving is as
great as receiving. Children design handcrafted gifts that
are destined to travel to other children around the world. At
each destination, the receiving children are encouraged to
play with the gifts and enjoy them for a short time before
the gifts travel on to their next destination. The children
also write messages for each other on the dolls. Everyone
along the way can track the gifts and see where they are
and where they have been. Ultimately, after the gifts have
travelled to many locations, they are given to a child in
need somewhere in the world. MSTERIO provides all the
materials, cleaning, sanitising, shipping and tracking of
the gifts.
Right: Annemarie Mostert and PDG Francis Callard during
their visit to the park last year.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 27
VILLAGE BUILDERSPartnered with the Rotary Club of Shelton Skookum
(D5020, USA), the Rotary Club of Durban Bay (D9370)
helpedWozaMoya,aregisterednon-profitorganisation,
to uplift a community in the southern Drakensberg.
Once the funding was in place and the Global Grant
approved, the project got underway.
The first component was water, sanitation and hygiene
(WASH). It was decided to make Woza Moya and the
adjoining Sinevuso High School a site of excellence for eco-
toilets, hand washing and training.
A child and maternal health component started with a
programme called Stepping Stones, a community integrated
management of childhood illness programme, in which
community care workers (CCWs) learnt how to bring better
skills and healthcare to mothers and children. This disease
prevention and maternal education would reduce the area’s
child mortality rate. The training also included gender, HIV/
AIDS, sex, love, communications and changing of mindsets
to build a foundation for a productive family life.
The third area of focus was economic development
through sewing, knitting and skills training that was based on
ideas fromAngela Shaw at the KwaZulu-Natal Society of the
Arts. As a result of all the frantic learning and activity, there
was a wonderful range of refreshing crafts with lion and sock
monkeys ready for delivery to airport shops in South Africa
and abroad. Fabric designed by the crafters is being used to
make curtains and other goods. Greeting cards, bags and
mats, based on their embroidery designs, are also being
produced and sold.
This project has already positively impacted on early
health care, the understanding of relationships and
communication including HIV/AIDS.
Thirty adults have been employed and a large number of
the youth have been educated about health, menstruation
and hygiene.
A child uses one of the Tippy Taps that were erected as
part of the WASH component of the project.
One of the woman who received training as part of the
project. The crafts they make are sold by Woza Moya in
airports, shops and at fairs and markets.
Access to safe water from JoJo tanks and gutters now
provides for more time for education, as school children no
longer have to walk great distances to collect water.
One of the eco-toilets that was built as part of the WASH
component of the project.
28 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
During his daily morning commute to work, Spiro
Mitchell, a member of the Rotary Club of Waterfront
(D9350), noticed a young school boy pushing a
smartly dressed woman in a wheelchair to a bus
stop before sprinting to school.
After witnessing this exercise a few times, Spiro
grew concerned and stopped to speak with the disabled
woman, Cleopatra Mathetha, and her son, Kamvaletho.
Cleopatra, or Cleo as she is known, was brutally
attacked and stabbed by a neighbour’s relative after she
rebuffed his unwanted advances. The single mother of
a one-year old was just 19 at the time.
Cleo survived the horrific attack but was left a
paraplegic. She refused to allow the attack and resulting
paralysis to destroy her life. She remained employed at
a medical supply factory and went on to have another
son.
Spiro took a photo of the two and WhatsApp’ed it to
the club’s board with a request to add it to the agenda
of the next board meeting.
Before the board meeting, President Siham Boda
contacted Bobby Barua, a friend from Johannesburg
who serves as group counsel for one of the world’s
largest engineering firms. Barua has significant physical
disabilities but accepts no limitations to what he can
achieve. Boda described him as one of the “most
intelligent and determined people” she knows.
She asked Barua for advice on where to source
an electric wheelchair. He immediately offered her his
spare electric wheelchair that he kept for emergencies
and assured Boda it would be robust enough for road
use. The only thing it was missing was a charger for the
battery. She accepted the gift valued at R25 000.
When he heard of the donation, Mitchell sprang to
action and arranged for the wheelchair to be couriered
to Cape Town.
President Siham Boda, Cleopatra Mathetha and Spiro Mitchell.
THE HEART OF A ROTARIAN
Bobby Barua gave his spare electric
wheelchair to Cleopatra Mathetha.
SHAREYOURCLUBNEWSWITHROTARYINAFRICA
Email stories, photos and captions to rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za
Photos must be at least 1MB in size. Please make sure first and surnames are supplied
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 29
More than 1 500 national and international para-
athletes entered a wheelchair race in George.
For 15 years, the Outeniqua Wheelchair Challenge
has been successfully staged. During its first year the
race only had 27 entries.
The challenge was the first and only event to be
staged exclusively for disabled athletes in South Africa.
It is endorsed by the South African Sports Association
for the Physically Disabled, South African Sports
Confederation and Disability Sports South Africa.
Every year, the number of entries has increased
dramatically as disabled people in wheelchairs flock to
compete in the annual event.
The cumulative monetary and logistical support of
Airports Company South Africa, George and George
Municipality has helped ensure that this event is one
which meets international standards.
Athletes in racing wheelchairs, adapted bicycles,
hand cycles, basketball chairs and ordinary wheelchairs
take on the challenge which is not only about speed
but also endurance. There are different race categories,
including a 42.2 kilometre marathon, 21.1 kilometre
half marathon, 10 kilometre race and five kilometre fun
event. The Rotary Club of George (D9350) is proud to
be part of this unique event. Previously, the club has
helped by taking on the catering duties. This year was
no different as Rotarians and partners gave a food
parcel to each of the participants.insider
T B D
½ h - 7" × 4.4375"
VOYAGE.
FORMATION.
DÉCOUVERTE.
TRAVEL.
LEARN.
GROW.
TRAVEL.
LEARN.
GROW.
Long-term exchanges build peace one young person
at a time. Students learn a new language, discover
another culture, and live with host families for a full
academic year. Become a global citizen. Start in one
of more than 100 countries.
Long-term exchanges build peace one young person
at a time. Students learn a new language, discover
another culture, and live with host families for a full
academic year. Become a global citizen. Start in one
of more than 100 countries.
Long-term exchanges build peace one young person
at a time. Students learn a new language, discover
another culture, and live with host families for a full
academic year. Become a global citizen. Start in one
of more than 100 countries.
ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE
LONG-TERM
ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE
LONG-TERM
ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE
LONG-TERM
海外体験。
学び。
奉仕。
TRAVEL.
LEARN.
SERVE.
TRAVEL.
LEARN.
SERVE.
目標をもって海を渡り、異国での奉仕活動に参加し、短
期間の滞在で新しいスキルを学びたいと思う大学生やフ
レッシュ社会人にとって、この上ない特別な経験ができる
でしょう。
Professional development with a purpose: University
students and young professionals learn new
skills, learn a language, and take action through
humanitarian service during short-term, customizable
exchanges.
Professional development with a purpose: University
students and young professionals learn new
skills, learn a language, and take action through
humanitarian service during short-term, customizable
exchanges.
新世代交換 NEW GENERATIONS
SERVICE EXCHANGE
NEW GENERATIONS
SERVICE EXCHANGE
TRAVEL.
DISCOVERY.
FUN.
TRAVEL.
DISCOVERY.
FUN.
TRAVEL.
DISCOVERY.
FUN.
Short-term exchanges immerse young people in
another culture. Some live with host families for up
to three months, while others embark on a tour or
go to camp for a few weeks. Go on an adventure in
one of more than 100 countries.
Short-term exchanges immerse young people in
another culture. Some live with host families for up
to three months, while others embark on a tour or
go to camp for a few weeks. Go on an adventure in
one of more than 100 countries.
Short-term exchanges immerse young
another culture. Some live with host f
to three months, while others embark
go to camp for a few weeks. Go on a
one of more than 100 countries.
ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE
SHORT-TERM
ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE
SHORT-TERM
ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE
SHORT-TERM
目標をもって海を渡り、異国での奉仕活動に参加し、短
期間の滞在で新しいスキルを学びたいと思う大学生やフ
レッシュ社会人にとって、この上ない特別な経験ができる
VIAJES.
AVENTURAS.
DIVERSIÓN.
SERVICE.
FRIENDSHIP.
FUN.
SERVICE.
FRIENDSHIP.
FUN.
Toma acción, promueve la comprensión internacional
y forja nuevas amistades alrededor del mundo.
Desarrolla tus aptitudes de liderazgo mientras
descubres el poder de Dar de Sí antes de Pensar en Sí
y cuan divertido es el verdadero liderazgo.
Take action, build international understanding,
and make new friends around the world. Develop
your leadership skills while you discover the power
of Service Above Self and find out how serious
leadership can be seriously fun!
Take action, build international understanding,
and make new friends around the world. Develop
your leadership skills while you discover the power
of Service Above Self and find out how serious
leadership can be seriously fun!
Short-term exchanges immerse young people in
another culture. Some live with host families for up
to three months, while others embark on a tour or
LIDERANÇA.
INSPIRAÇÃO.
DIVERSÃO.
LEADERSHIP.
INSPIRATION.
FUN.
LEADERSHIP.
INSPIRATION.
FUN.
Descubra um mundo novo fora da sala de aula.
Participe de um programa intensivo de liderança que
se baseia em técnicas de comunicação, solução de
problemas e maneiras de transformar o mundo num
lugar melhor.
Discover a world outside the classroom through
an intensive leadership experience that builds
communication skills, teaches creative problem-
solving, and challenges you to change not only
yourself but the world.
Discover a world outside the classroom through
an intensive leadership experience that builds
communication skills, teaches creative problem-
solving, and challenges you to change not only
yourself but the world.
INSPIRAÇÃO.
DIVERSÃO.
INSPIRAÇÃO.
DIVERSÃO.
INSPIRAÇÃO.
Descubra um mundo novo fora da sala de aula.
Participe de um programa intensivo de liderança que
se baseia em técnicas de comunicação, solução de
problemas e maneiras de transformar o mundo num
lugar melhor.
FORMATION.
DÉCOUVERTE.
FORMATION.
DÉCOUVERTE.
to three months, while others embark on a tour or
go to camp for a few weeks. Go on an adventure in
one of more than 100 countries.
AVENTURAS.
DIVERSIÓN.
Toma acción, promueve la comprensión internacional
y forja nuevas amistades alrededor del mundo.
Desarrolla tus aptitudes de liderazgo mientras
Dar de Sí antes de Pensar en Sí
y cuan divertido es el verdadero liderazgo.
another culture. Some live with host families for up
to three months, while others embark on a tour or
SERVICE.
LEADERSHIP.
ACTION.
SERVICE.
LEADERSHIP.
ACTION.
SERVICE.
LEADERSHIP.
ACTION.
Join the global movement of young leaders taking
action to build a better world. Exchange ideas with
leaders in your community and mobilize your friends
to develop innovative solutions to the world’s most
pressing common challenges.
Join the global movement of young leaders taking
action to build a better world. Exchange ideas with
leaders in your community and mobilize your friends
to develop innovative solutions to the world’s most
pressing common challenges.
Join the global movement of young leaders taking
action to build a better world. Exchange ideas with
leaders in your community and mobilize your friends
to develop innovative solutions to the world’s most
pressing common challenges.
Create your own promotional
cards to showcase your youth
activities. Available now in
Rotary’s Brand Center.
CREATE.
SHARE.
CONNECT.
YouthProgramsCard_RotarianAD_halfpage.indd 1 2/6/17 2:32 PM
GATHERING IN GEORGE
30 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
Lifecycle Week, the week leading up to the Cape
Town Cycle Tour (CTCT), presents an opportunity
for people from all walks (or wheels) of life to
participate in the iconic event. Eighty people with
disabilities participated in the CTCT’s newest pilot
event, a wheelchair route of almost three kilometres
around Green Point Stadium.
The race served as an opportunity for participants to
raise funds for the Cape Town Association for Physically
Disabled (CTAPD) by collecting sponsorship for each
entry. Organised by a CTCT partner, the Rotary Club
of Claremont (D9350), the wheelchair event aimed to
share the message that everyone, no matter their age
or ability, can participate in the CTCT.
“Each participant had between two and four friends
supporting them and taking turns, much like in a relay,
to push them around the course,” explained Liz Rose,
president of the Rotary Club of Claremont.
“Most of the participants only met their team on the
day, creating a fantastic interaction opportunity while
they decorated the wheelchairs to reflect the theme of
Bling Your Ride.”
“While wheels are a critical part of a bicycle they are
equally important for a wheelchair; they give a differently
abled person the freedom they deserve to move about.
We are thrilled to support the Cape Town Association
for Physically Disabled through this fundraising event
and to help people with disabilities achieve true
independence and inclusion in society,” said Rose.
An ecstatic team crosses the finish line at the Cape Town Cycle Tour’s wheelchair event. The spirit at the event was
remarkable as the teams cheered each other on towards the finish line.
THE WHEEL WINNERS!
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 31
Thirty-five people will be getting new wheelchairs
from Rotary clubs in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands.
Greg Cryer, a member of the Rotary E-Club of South
Africa One (D9370), was instrumental in arranging
the donation that was received by the Rotary Clubs
of Pietermaritzburg, Hilton and Howick, Mooi River
Midlands and E-Club of South Africa One.
The wheelchairs were sourced from The Wheelchair
Foundation UK, a non-profit organisation started
by Rotary in Great Britain and Ireland that seeks to
deliver a wheelchair to every child, teenager and adult
who needs but cannot afford one and to give a new
independence to those deprived of mobility by war,
disease, accident, natural disaster or advanced age.
More than 14 000 disabled South Africans have
received wheelchairs from the foundation and
altogether, more than 40 000 have been delivered to
people all over the world.
Long standing friends of District 9370, Elaine and
PDG Milton Frary (of the Rotary Club of Wetherby and
District, D1040) organised the supply of the wheelchairs.
Together with four friends, Rachel and Louden Blair,
Jay Middleton and his wife, Linda Lessy, the couple
visited South Africa and toured the Midlands to visit the
various beneficiaries.
They visited Howick on a sunny Friday and were
hosted by the Rotary Club of Hilton and Howick. After
been taken to some of the local attractions including the
Nelson Mandela Capture site by club members Janice
Shipway and Sarah Paterson, the group moved to the
more serious business of attending the official handover
of 10 wheelchairs after lunch.
On arriving at Sunfield Home they were met by
Pat Draper of the Rotary E-Club of South Africa One.
During the presentation they heard more about two of
the beneficiaries; Sunfield Home Howick and Umgeni
Hospital. Sunfield staff and Carl Haberman, the
chairman of the Friends of Umgeni Hospital, were on
Elaine and Milton Frary, Janice Shipway, Jay Middleton and his wife, Linda Lessey, and Rachel and Louden Blair at the
Nelson Mandela Capture Site.
A gift of independence
32 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
TIME WAITS FOR NO ONE
Promote your business, club or district
activities in ROTARY AFRICA
Contact Rotary Africa at
rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za or call 031 267 1848
•	 Reach our readers in
English-speaking Africa
•	 Advertise in ROTARY AFRICA
•	 Distribute leaflets, brochures and
newsletters with ROTARY AFRICA
•	 Special rates for Rotary clubs, districts
and Rotarian owned/managed business
hand to meet the group.
After a short presentation, the group toured the
impressive facilities and were introduced to a number
of the charming residents. They were interested to hear
that many high-achieving South African para-athletes
reside and train at Sunfield. The home’s mission is to
provide a caring and a home-like environment for a wide
spectrum of mentally disabled adults. In doing so, the
home undertakes to involve its residents in appropriate
training, occupational and recreational activities that will
enhance their lifelong well-being.
Umgeni Hospital is a specialised hospital in Howick
that provides care for intellectually challenged persons
with physical and multiple disabilities. The hospital
caters for people of all races from three years of age and
older within KwaZulu-Natal and the Friends of Umgeni
Hospital works with hospital management to identify
needs and support the hospital. The organisation
ensures that the hospital has amenities that are not
provided for by the government, promotes social and
recreational activities and assists with funding for
outings, parties and special events such as Christmas
and Easter.
After the tour, the group was met by members of the
Rotary Club of Mooi River Midlands who hosted them
for the weekend.
Rachel Blair with two of the beneficiaries. Rachel runs and founded the charity
Kindness in Action.
Milton Frary and one of the residents
during the tour of Sunfield Home
Howick.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 33
On Thursday 23 February 1905, Paul
Harris, Silvester Schiele, Hiram Shorey
and Gustavus Loehr met in Room 711
of the Unity Building on Dearborn
Street in Chicago and formed the first
ever Rotary club, the Rotary Club of
Chicago.
To mark the 113th anniversary of
Rotary, the Rotary Club of Msasa (D9210)
decided to show Zimbabweans the
difference that Rotary is making in their
world. Many ideas were considered but
it was eventually agreed that a Rotary
Birthday Fun Run and Walk would best
achieve its goals for the anniversary. As
Rotary International has six main areas of
focus, the Rotary Club of Msasa decided to
choose six charities that best represented
these areas of focus.
The proceeds from the event were
evenly divided between:
•	 Water and Sanitation: Team Up to
Clean Up Mbare
•	 Conflict and Peace Resolution:
Kites For Peace Zimbabwe
•	 Basic Education and Literacy:
Yellow Bus Trust
•	 Economic and Community
Development: St. Joseph’s House
for Boys
By Tatenda Tavaziva, the Rotary Club of
Msasa (D9210)
The event was all inclusive and people of all abilities were welcome to
participate.
Birthday fun day
34 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
•	 Maternal and Child Health: Baby Heroes Africa
Foundation
•	 Disease Prevention and Treatment: Project 127
The Rotary Club of Msasa is the sponsor club
of the Interact Club of Gateway High School and
this relationship was further cemented at this event.
Gateway High School allowed the Rotarians to use the
school as the race venue and the Interactors assisted
as volunteers on the day. Rotaract clubs came on board
with Belvedere Technical Teachers College (BTTC)
and the Parirenyatwa School of Nursing (PARISON) to
provide incredible manpower for the event.
Saturday 24 February, was a day the Rotary Club of
Msasa will never forget! The day’s schedule was fun-
filled and family friendly with yoga specialist Jean-Paul
Baron leading the crowd in stretches.
The race started on time at exactly 7am and Star
FM, one of the leading radio stations in the country, did
a live outdoor broadcast from the venue. DJ Cuzindred
provided entertaining music throughout the day and
Kingdom Inflatables was on site with jumping castles
for the children.
The morning included Zumba with the well-known
and energetic Zororo “Zorro” Nhira who got everyone
dancing to his lively music and well-choreographed
Zumba moves.
More than $2 600 was raised from the 500
participants at the gate, while 50 volunteers and 15
corporate sponsors donated a combined total of $4 148.
A fun Zumba session before the races got the pulses
racing and the participants energised.
Stand Up for the Champions! Tadiwa Gwede won the
men’s five kilometre and Tinashe Muzhingi finished second
in the men’s 10 kilometre race.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 35
Youth
After returning from six weeks in France, Short-
Term Rotary Exchange (STEP) student, Claire
Cuthill, a Grade 11 pupil at Fish Hoek High School,
reported back to the members of the Rotary Club
Cape of Good Hope (D9350).
Claire spent six weeks with her host sister, Agathe
Pelhate, in the small town of Saint Martin Des Champs
in Brittany, France, which is near the Mont Saint Michel.
She spoke about the similarities and differences she
experience in French life.
One of the biggest differences was the school day
of about eight hours with lunch served in the cafeteria.
Each class was two hours long and there was a 20
minute break between classes.
She was lucky to travel around the area and spent
three days in Paris. Her good command of the French
language made communication easy and added to the
joy of her Rotary Youth Exchange.
After six weeks in Italy, Hannah Watkinson and Ashley
King of Grace College returned to the KwaZulu-Natal
Midlands more confident and with many stories of their
adventures abroad. The two Short-Term Rotary Youth
Exchange students were sponsored by the Rotary Club of
Hilton and Howick (D9370).
“It shaped my life in ways I could never have imagined,”
said King who was hosted in a small town near Naples.
Watkinson was hosted in town near Milan in northern Italy.
Her mother, Joanne, describes Hannah as a “real homebody”
and said her family was surprised when she announced she
wanted to take part in a youth exchange and said “I want to
challenge myself.”
“She wanted to do something that was uniquely hers. She
came back completely confident,” said Joanne.
Ashley and Hannah had each hosted their host sisters
earlier in 2017. The four quickly became friends and had
made plans to meet and explore while the two Grace College
learners were in Italy.
Highlights of their Italian adventure included learning Italian
Christmas customs and exploring attractions such as Venice
and Pompeii. Hannah Watkinson and Ashley King.
Rotarian Maughreen Ladbrook, President Marge Upfold and Claire Cuthill with her parents, Lynne and John Cuthill.
CLAIRE’S FRENCH ADVENTURE
IMPRESSIVE ITALY
Ashley & Hannah return from
36 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
The Rotary Club of Klerksdorp (D9370) held a Head Boy and Head Girl Dinner in February. They were given the topic
of Fake News to discuss and highlighted many thought-provoking points. At the dinner are Schoonspruit High School
educators Dries and Elsabe de Beer with Anroeschke Kleyn and Flipppie Greeff.
Members of the St George’s Preparatory Interact Club visited Heatherbank Primary School. The Interact club is overseen
by Jeff Ilsley, the Youth Service Director of the Rotary Club of Algoa Bay (D9370).
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 37
Roundup
El-Shamman House was started eight
years ago by Allistair and Merencia
Scholtz to care for babies aged
between birth and two years of age.
The couple’s motto is ‘unlocking
hope’ and they passionately ensure
that each abandoned baby has
the building blocks for a happy
and healthy life after adoption.
Over the years, the Rotary Club of
Bedfordview (D9400) has supported
the home and provided it with items,
such as a microwave, deep freeze,
toys and clothing, from its wishlist.
The club has adopted the home as
an ongoing project and will continue
to support it. Allistair and Merencia
Scholtz recently visited the club and
received a gift from the club’s Fillipa
Heyneke and President Allan Rock.
Vernon Naidoo of the
Rotary Club of Algoa
Bay (D9370) handing
out some of the 45
wheelchairs the club
obtained from Milton
Frary of the Wheelchair
Foundation in the UK.
The wheelchairs were
distributed to worthy
recipients through
organisations such as
the Association for the
Physically Disabled,
Ubomi Ubotsha, Cheshire
Homes, Missionvale Care
Centre, Carehaven and
Nazareth House.
About 350 senior citizens
from Paarl, Wellington
and Hermon attended a
free concert in the Paarl
Town Hall. The annual
event was organised by
the Rotary Club of Paarl
(D9350) and all the artists
performed free of charge.
With President Abie Martin
(front centre) are Peter
Van Niekerk (leader of the
Peter Van Band), Karen
(singer), John Koopman
(comedian), Leon Coetzee
(bass guitarist) and Dave
Rawlings (drummer). Other
artists were the African
Percussion Band and
soloists from the Frank
Pietersen Music Centre,
magician Chris Welsh and
singers Felicity Kiran and
Loren Erasmus.
38 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
The Rotary E-Club of South
Africa One (D9370) donated
an oxygen concentrator to
the frail care unit at Damant
Lodge in Port Alfred. At
the handover are Sister
Marion Kelly, Rotarian
Tina Hon, Bruce Smith,
Rotarian Mike Millard, Maria
Milne, Rotarian Hans Hon
and Christine Haworth.
The funds were originally
raised by the Rotary Club
of Hamburg-International
(D1890, Germany). “Damant
Lodge required an oxygen
machine for their Frail Care
Unit, so we were given
money to purchase the
machine locally,” Hon said.
The Rotary Club of Boksburg Lake (D9400) held an
international dinner to celebrate the 113th anniversary
of Rotary International in February. Fiona Martin (front)
spoke passionately about orphaned chimpanzees and
her volunteer work at chimp sanctuary Ngamba Island,
Lake Victoria. With her is Elsa Venter of the Rotary Club of
Boksburg Lake.
Every year, the members of the Rotary Club of Algoa
Bay (D9370) are kept extremely busy as they marshal the
Fedhealth XTERRA triathlon.
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 39
The Rotary Club of Kimberley South (D9370) received boxes of linen from Sun International which it donated, along with
some books, to Caritas for distribution. At the handover are Elize von Bezing, Estie van der Merwe, Rob Gibson and Willie
Goldblatt.
Members of the Rotary Club of Bedfordview (D9400) are strong supporters of rhino conservation efforts. They recently
had the opportunity to investigate the role the honorary rangers of the Kruger National Park play in saving the rhino. One
of the things the honorary rangers have done is plant vegetable gardens to feed the full time rangers at outlying stations.
The gardens are constructed using prefabricated structures, weld mesh and shade-cloth which keeps “unwanted critters”
of all shapes and sizes out of the gardens and provides the rangers with a constant supply of fresh vegetables.
The deployment of high-tech equipment and skilled anti-poaching reaction teams have helped decrease poaching over
the last three years, from more than 1 000 a year in 2015 to 500 in the last year. The Rotarians were horrified to hear that
at any given time, there are 12 or more teams of poachers active in the park. The club is investigating ways to assist the
honorary rangers, who were represented by Andy Wright, Andrew Watt and Shaun O’Brian. With them is Jose Lourenco of
the Rotary Club of Bedfordview.
40 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
A devastating fire at Moeggesukkel informal settlement in Uitenhage destroyed 17 homes and left many people homeless
and destitute. The residents were given temporary shelter at Langa Hall but their most pressing need was food and the
wherewithal to prepare it. The Rotary Club of Uitenhage South (D9370) rapidly responded and quickly collected several
thousand rands worth of food and basic necessities that were delivered to the victims by Rotarians.
The Rotary Club of Bloemfontein-Raadzaal (D9370) delivered 10 wheelchairs to MUCPP Community Health Centre in
Bloemfontein. At the presentation are Laura Sello, Nina le Grange, LE Setlhare, Rod Jacobs, President Joe Bazirake and
President Mike Mahase (of the Rotary Club of Bloemfontein-Thabure).
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 41
WHICH CLUB MEETS TODAY directory 2018/19
Make sure your club’s correct details have been sent to Rotary Africa for
inclusion in the new directory.
Email rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za for more information
The Rotary Club of Kimberley South (D9370) gave 10 new mattresses to Jannie Roux Children’s Home in Barkly West. At
the presentation are Pat Green, Judith de Villiers, Elize von Bezing and Ingrid Human.
A breakfast for residents at Laubscher Park Retirement Village was arranged by the Rotarians and Anns of the Rotary
Club of Algoa Bay (D9370). At the breakfast are Naomi Stacey, Sandy Wells, Marlene Calder, Karen De Jager and Trevor
Wells.
42 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
WELCOMED AND HONOUREDNEW MEMBERS, RECOGNITIONS AND AWARDS
Koos Burger is a new
member of the Rotary Club
of Cape of Good Hope
(D9350).
Nathalie Owen is a new
member of the Rotary Anns
Club of Boksburg Lake
(D9400).
Kerry Lee Allen is a new
member of the Rotary Club
of Meyerton/Henley-on-Klip
(D9400).
Dave and Hayley Howard are new members of the Rotary
Club of Kenton on Sea (D9370).
Lukholo Badi received a
Vocational Award from the
Rotary Club of Algoa Bay
(D9370).
Kahesh Singh is a new
member of the Rotary Club
of Johannesburg South 101
(D9400).
Nicky Savvides of the
Rotary Club of Boksburg
Lake (D9400) received the
Avenues of Service Award.
Johan and Pam Els are new members of the Rotary and
Rotary Anns Clubs of Boksburg Lake (D9400).
Maughreen Ladbrook is a
new member of the Rotary
Club of Cape of Good Hope
(D9350).
Aimee Kuhl is a new
member of the Rotary Club
of Cape of Good Hope
(D9350).
recognised
April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 43
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accommodation and rates. All rooms luxury en-
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info contact Rtn Rob Gibson at 072 116 8390
Web: www.thenookbnb.co.za
‘ABOVE THE WAVES’ IN SIMON’S
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Contact 021 786 3331 or peteandme@
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KIMBERLEY’S GUM TREE Lodge offers budget
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Your host Debbie. Tel: 053 832 8577, Cell 083 352
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DISCLAIMER: All opinions published are not
the opinion of the publisher. The publisher is not
responsible for the accuracy of any of the opinions,
information or advertisements in this publication. No
responsibility is accepted for the quality of advertised
goods or services or the accuracy of material
submitted for reproduction. To the extent permitted
by law, the publishers, their employees, agents
and contractors exclude all liability to any person for
any loss, damage, cost or expense incurred as a
result of material in this publication.All Rotary Marks
(Masterbrand Signature, Mark of Excellence and so
forth),aswellasROTARYaretrademarksownedby
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Club of Boksburg
DONATE a School Bag TODAYand help a child in need.
“A School Bag For All” Campaign aims to provide
underprivileged school children the necessary
School Kit to enhance their dignity
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HELP KIDS IN NEED SUCCEED!
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Join East Rand Stereo & Rotary Boksburgto support education.
Contact Derek Fox on 082 886 0651
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Stamp Collection
FOR SALE
South West African collection
from 1897 Deutsch-
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1990 Flora, incl Postage
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Virtually complete.All mint/
unmounted mint. Fully written
up in loose leaf album.
SACC catalogue
value R313 391
Asking price R180 000 ono
Email:
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44 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018
Register today for World Water Summit 10 at www.wasrag.org
WASRAG’s 10th summit will focus on
two tracks. First – Helping Rotarians
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to health care facilities where medical
staff lack clean water for maternity and
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Rotarians are taking the lead in fighting
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enemy, polio. Whether you’ve done
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Rotary Africa - April 2018

  • 2. GIVE TODAY AND TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE TAKE ACTION: www.rotary.org/give TOO MANY GIRLS SPEND UP TO 6 HOURS A DAY COLLECTING WATER.* *UN Water. (2013). UN-Water factsheet on water and gender,World Water Day 2013.
  • 3. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 3 Rotary Africa is a member of the Rotary World Magazine Press in this issue...Upfront 4 | From the editor 5 | Message from the RI President 6 | Foundation Chair’s message. What you should know 7 | 2018 RI Convention 8 | A different kind of Rotary leader 9 | Foundation matters 12 | Inspired to lead 13 | From information to inspiration 16 | A Rotary family story 17 | Inspiring presidents-elect 18 | Service, flexibility and fun 20 | Incredible India 21 | 2018 so far Projects 22 | Bags of Love 23 | Peace Dignity Hope 27 | Village builders 28 | The heart of a Rotarian 29 | Gathering in George 30 | The wheel winners! 31 | A gift of independence 33 | Birthday fun day Youth 35 | Claire’s French adventure Impressive Italy 36 | Club and district youth news Round up 37 | Club and district news Recognised 42 | Welcomed and honoured
  • 4. 4 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 Editor Sarah van Heerden Administration Sharon Robertson Chairman Gerald Sieberhagen Directors Greg Cryer Andy Gray Peter Hugo Natty Moodley Annemarie Mostert Publisher Rotary in Africa Reg. No. 71/04840/08 (incorp.associationnotfor gain) PBO No: 18/13/13/3091 RegisteredattheGPOasa newspaper Design & Layout Rotary in Africa Printers Colour Planet, Pinetown Advertising Sharon Robertson Sarah van Heerden Tariff card on request at www.rotaryafrica.com Subscriptions Sharon Robertson www.rotaryafrica.com (digital) Contributions rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za Distribution Rotary Districts 9210, 9211, 9212, 9220, 9350, 9370 and 9400 (Southern and Eastern Africa) Contact Rotary Africa PO Box 563 Westville 3630 South Africa Telephone 0027 (31) 267 1848 Fax 0027 (31) 267 1849 Email rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za Website www.rotaryafrica.com The Rotary Emblem, Rotary International, Rotary, Rotary Club and Rotarian are trademarks of Rotary International and are used under licence. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of Rotary Africa,RotaryInternationalorTheRotaryFoundation. MEET OUR TEAM From the Editor SarahSarahLike us on Facebook There is nothing worse than arriving at a gathering happy, energised and full of ideas only to be deflated by what I call, motivation vampires. There is nothing wrong with pointing out the short comings of ideas (constructive criticism) but there is a lot wrong with shooting down ideas (destructive criticism). So, what is the difference? Constructive criticism is a positive form of criticism, it does not demotivate individuals, it highlights an issue but offers a positive suggestion on how to correct the short comings. Destructive criticism impacts negatively on the person receiving it. It may insult them, isolate them or worse, demotivate them. Why is this important? I listened to a discussion about membership and while it is highly likely that in our desperation to boost our membership, we are engaging with the wrong type of people, we also have to look at ourselves and ask if there is something in the club that is driving members away? I have noticed that in general, there is far too much destructive negativity in our day-to-day interactions. People leave these encounters tense, demotivated and with the proverbial, bad taste in the mouth. An experience like this at your club is dangerous as it won’t impact on just one person. There is a good chance that it may impact on two or more people; everyone who was inspired is deflated. These people start to dread attending meetings and having to deal with the negativity; they feel emotionally drained as if a “vampire” had sucked the positive energy from their beings. Eventually, they walk away and quite possibly, will be followed by others. So what can we do to improve the situation? Why not ask the president or someone close to the negative individuals to speak to them. It is possible that they don’t realise the impact of their words and actions. Perhaps if they were made aware of this, they would adjust accordingly. I also think that instituting a fun club rule that if someone says something negative, they need to follow it with a suggestion for improvement or pay a fine to EREY or End Polio Now. This simple rule will automatically convert destructive criticism into constructive criticism; it will energise and motivate! I was fortunate enough to be invited to speak at and report on the D9370 POETS last month. During one of the tea breaks I heard someone say, “Why do we need another e-club? We have three in South Africa, that is more than enough!” I bit my tongue and carried on walking as the answer, in my view, is extremely clear and supported by the numbers. The three e-clubs in South Africa have one thing in common, one thing that the most average clubs dream of: High membership. I believe, and the data I’ve seen supports this, that e-clubs are one of the avenues through which Rotary can secure its future. Life is busy and complicated. People travel a lot more for work today than what they did 20 years ago. The flexibility offered by e-clubs is what attracts members and keeps them. As far as I understand, our e-cubs meet as a club and members who live in the same geographical areas also socialise and undertake projects together as ‘clusters’. They interact, serve and enjoy fellowship. What is more impressive is what they are achieving. All this makes me think of something my grandmother used to say: “If you have nothing nice to say; say nothing!” And if you still choose to say it, why not say sorry with a donation to End Polio Now?
  • 5. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 5 IAN RISELEY President, Rotary International Message from the RI PRESIDENT upfront Speeches & news from RI President Ian Riseley www.rotary.org/office-president Dear Fellow Rotarians, At the 1990 Rotary International Convention in Portland, Oregon, then President-Elect Paulo Costa told the gathered Rotarians, “The hour has come for Rotary to raise its voice, to claim its leadership and to rouse all Rotarians to an honourable crusade to protect our natural resources.” He declared a Rotary initiative to “Preserve Planet Earth,” asking Rotarians to make environmental issues part of their service agenda: to plant trees, to work to keep our air and water clean and to protect the planet for future generations. President Costa asked that one tree be planted for each of the 1.1 million members that Rotary had at the time. We Rotarians, as is our wont, did better, planting nearly 35 million trees by the end of the Rotary year. Many of those trees are likely still flourishing today, absorbing carbon from the environment, releasing oxygen, cooling the air, improving soil quality, providing habitat and food for birds, animals and insects and yielding a host of other benefits. Unfortunately, while those trees have kept on doing good for the environment, Rotary as a whole has not carried its environmental commitment forward. That is why, at the start of this year, I followed Paulo Costa’s example and asked Rotary to plant at least one tree for every Rotary member. My goal was to achieve something more than the considerable benefits that those 1.2 million (or more!) trees would themselves bring. It is my hope that by planting trees, Rotarians will renew their interest in and attention to an issue that we must put back on the Rotary agenda: The state of our planet. Environmental issues are deeply entwined in every one of our areas of focus and cannot be dismissed as “not Rotary’s concern”. Pollution is affecting health across the globe: More than 80 percent of people in urban areas breathe unsafe air, a number that rises to 98 percent in low and middle-income countries. If current trends continue, by 2050 the oceans are expected to contain more plastics by weight than fish. And rising temperatures are well-documented: Global annual average temperatures increased by about 2 degrees F (1.1 degrees C) from 1880 through 2015. That this change was caused by humans is not a subject of scientific debate nor is the likelihood of vast economic and human disruption if the trend continues unchecked. The need for action is greater than ever and so is our ability to have a real impact. As past UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon put it, “There can be no Plan B, because there is no Planet B.” Our planet belongs to all of us, to our children and their children. It is for all of us to protect and for all of us in Rotary to make a difference.
  • 6. 6 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster: First. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service; Second. High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society; Third. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal, business, and community life; Fourth. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service. Of the things we think, say or do: 1) Is it the TRUTH? 2) Is it FAIR to all concerned? 3) Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS? 4) Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned? Object of Rotary The Four-Way Test what you should know Paul Netzel FOUNDATION TRUSTEE CHAIR FOUNDATION TRUSTEE CHAIR’S MESSAGE Learn more about Rotary at: www.rotary.org ROTARY Members: 1 230 399 Clubs: 35 784 ROTARACT Members: 249 757 Clubs: 10 859 INTERACT Members: 512 417 Clubs: 22 279 RCC Members: 223 260 Corps: 9 707 ROTARY AT A GLANCEAs of 30 November What are your challenges? I want to hear your thoughts. Email me at paul.netzel@rotary.org. The new grant model comes up frequently during my visits with Rotarians throughout the world. It is always disappointing to learn that a club or district lacks interest in participating in Global Grants. What are the reasons I hear most often? Global Grants are too complicated. They take too much work, require too much money. Or the available pool of DDFs (District Designated Funds) may not be large enough to meet the demand. Yet the numbers tell a story that can be perceived as positive. During 2016/17 (The Rotary Foundation’s centennial year), 1 260 Global Grants were awarded, an eight percent increase over the previous year. The figures for the first half of this Rotary year are running ahead of last year. Your ongoing feedback and suggestions have helped make a difference. Numerous upgrades have been made to the Global Grant online application process. The time it takes to process Global Grants has been significantly reduced. In 2016/17, the average was 129 business days from the time a grant application was submitted to the first payment. The average was 107 business days for 2017/18 as of 1 February. IfyourclubhasnotparticipatedinaGlobalGrant,Iurge you to take another look at the resources now available. Start by looking at the newly redesigned Rotary Grant Centre at grants.rotary.org. Explore the comprehensive resources linked in the right-hand column. Our Foundation’s outstanding grants staff wants to help, drawing on its expertise and TRF’s collective experience. Establish a relationship with the staff contact for your project district. The Rotary Support Centre can provide contact information within one business day (rotarysupportcenter@rotary.org). The Rotary Foundation’s Cadre of Technical Advisers is a group of volunteer Rotarians who also provide technical expertise and advice to Rotarians planning and carrying out Rotary projects. If you would like to receive guidance on project planning early in the process, contact cadre@rotary.org. A critical role of the Trustees is to listen. Rotary members have spoken. Together we are a powerful force of volunteers who identify needs and respond with generosity, creativity and passion. Rotary grants provide us with a unique opportunity to bring ideas to reality and to make a lasting impact, whether locally or globally.
  • 7. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 7 TRANSIT OPTIONS 2018 RI Convention Remember us in your will. salvationarmy.org.za/legacies-bequests After you land at Pearson International Airport for the 2018 Rotary International Convention in Toronto, from 23 to 27 June, there are many ways to get into the city. You could take a taxi or airport limo. If you want to tour the area on your own, you could rent a car. But you could also save money by taking the express light rail train or public transportation. The Union Pearson Express departs the airport for Union Station every 15 minutes. A round-trip ticket for the 25-minute ride is CA$24.70; seniors pay half that amount. You might instead take one of the buses run by the Toronto Transit Commission (commonly known as the TTC). The 192 Airport Rocket will get you downtown in 45 minutes. The TTC includes a vast system of buses, subways, and streetcars. You can use all these services during a one-way trip as long as you have a paper transfer. Each trip is roughly $3, less for seniors and students, and can be paid for through cash or token. If you plan on exploring Toronto during the convention, you can buy a pass that provides unlimited travel around the city for a day ($12.50) or a week ($43.75, seniors $34.75). – Randi Druzin To register, go to riconvention.org.
  • 8. 8 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 A DIFFERENT KIND PDG Andrew Jaeger, Rotary Coordinator, Zone 20A South The modern day Rotarian cannot be lured into our organisation with promises of quick and easy solutionsandaperfectworld.Thechallengesweface in our beloved organisation are multidimensional. They are complex and demanding of our cognitive, emotional and social intelligences.  In addition, modern day life is fast-paced with relentless waves of change. In such a world, the quality of what we offer and our progress are more dependent on the ability to respond effectively to situations than it is to comply with rules, regulations and standards.  Simplyput:Inapost-modernworldbeyondblueprints, formulas, textbook solutions and the dominance of reason, Rotary leaders must have deep intuitive insight, grounded in a solid foundation of principles and values. Equally important is the regard for relationships of all kinds and knowing how to preserve them.   Developing leaders Great leaders know how to balance the necessary regulations of good governance and accountability, with the creativity and skill to optimise opportunities that unlock their full potential. This has a significant impact on the type of leader that is needed in Rotary (as in business) as well as the methodology which is used to develop such leaders. The requirement to respond quickly but with a long-term and holistic view, demands leadership skill and ability at all levels of an organisation. Therefore, it needs to be the vision of leaders with the highest responsibility in an organisation to strategically build leadership among all of its members. The modern leader is characterised more by his insight, resolve and ability to ‘read’ people and situations than by his knowledge or charisma.  The development of a leader is therefore neither determined by nature (personality) nor by study or classroom training. The focus in developing a leader needs to be more experiential, learning from feedback and reflecting on inner and team dynamics. Developing and building leaders should not be seen or treated as an event. Instead the development of leaders is a process which is typically not classroom training, but rather hands-on coaching and facilitated self-reflection.  Developing good leaders is also not a theoretical application which is done in isolation; it is a continuous set of practical experiences which is applied in the context of teamwork. Such development of leaders must be done in a responsive manner which meets specific and immediate challenges - it is intensive, personal and must be outcomes focused.   Outcomes A leadership development initiative will only have real and lasting outcomes if the process ensures the internalisation of new knowledge with regards to leading oneself, leading change and leading others. The leader functions with new insight in what is more effective and beneficial for the whole. Growth as a leader demands ongoing introspection, reflection, listening to and learning from feedback. There are three essential questions that leaders should be able to answer convincingly. They are: How will you model excellence to us?   In other words, what is your example of character, courage, integrity and personal mastery? Where will you take us? In other words, what do you see as our destination and how we will get there? How will you engage us? In other words, how will you create an environment of inspiration, care, growth and discipline for all of us? Lifelong learning Real leaders are not those who have had one success story and then try to repeat it over and over again with nothing new to add. They are not those who sit back, fold their arms and declare that there is nothing left for them to learn - nothing of importance at least. To the contrary, real leaders are those people who over a lifetime were able to adjust and find new ways of applying themselves, new wisdom to go forward with, as well as new inspiration to overcome the challenges. Indeed, as JF Kennedy realised, leadership and learning are indispensable to each other. Not only is the ‘know-it-all’ attitude a sign of flawed leadership but learning in itself is a process of leading. The word ‘leadership’ implies the risk of going first. It implies new territory. It implies change. It implies learning. of Rotary leader
  • 9. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 9 MATERNAL & CHILD HEALTH Foundation matters By PDG Patrick Coleman: Regional Rotary Foundation Coordinator Zone 20A South He who saves a single life saves the entire world We have entered the final quarter of the Rotary year! Incoming district governors have been trained and are in the process of training their incoming club presidents and district teams. There is both the excitement of Making a Difference in finishing this Rotary year and the building anticipation of Be the Inspiration as the new Rotary year is about to begin. As we look at our present goals and the accomplishment of them, we evaluate our current situation and remind ourselves that our Rotary gift is Making a Difference in the lives of women and children around the world! Did you know that your gift to the Rotary Foundation makes high-quality health care available to vulnerable mothers and children so that they can live longer and grow stronger? Through our participation we expand access to quality care, so mothers and children everywhere can have the same opportunities for a healthy future. An estimated 5.9 million children under the age of five die each year because of malnutrition, inadequate health care and poor sanitation; all these deaths can be prevented! Rotary provides education, immunisations, birth kits and mobile health clinics. Women are taught how to prevent mother-to-infant HIV transmission, how to breastfeed and how to protect themselves and their children from disease. Rotary programmes improve women’s access to skilled health personnel: doctors, nurses, midwives or community health care workers. Rotary members distribute clean birth kits and train health workers in safe delivery of babies. Rotary members promote immunisations and regular checkups. They also distribute insecticide-treated bed nets. Clubs in Japan and Brazil used a Rotary Foundation Global Grant to equip a hospital with lifesaving neonatal equipment. In the mountains of Poland, 26 children traumatised by violence got a chance to be kids again at a Rotary camp where psychologists mixed escape and therapy. Alittle closer to home: Through the use of technology, doctors are bringing health care to women and children living in rural Nigeria (see more about this project at: https://bit.ly/2DPV0pB). Below is a brief overview of our Rotary Foundation giving in Zone 20A (sub Saharan Africa) this year. I know that many clubs wait until the end of the year to submit their contribution to The Rotary Foundation in order to save on bank fees (our club does this, too). This is simply a reminder that the year is coming to an end and to please be ready to Make a Difference by sending your gift on time. During this particular time of the year, it is appropriate to consider what the Jewish Talmud says: He who saves a single life saves the entire world. Our gifts to The Rotary Foundation do, in fact, contribute to “saving the world” one life at a time!
  • 10. 10 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 The Comrades Marathon Association’s six official charities for the next three years are The Community Chests of Durban and Pietermaritzburg, the Wildlands Conservation Trust, World Vision South Africa, Childhood Cancer Foundation of SA (CHOC), Hillcrest AIDS Foundation Trust and the Hospice Palliative Care Association. These organisations are no strangers to Rotary as many of our Rotary clubs regularly support them and have undertaken projects to assist them. Rotarians who have registered to run the 2018 Comrades Marathon can sign up to Race4Charity and collect sponsorship in support of the Amabeadibeadi Charity Drive. It began in 1996 and over the past 10 years, the official Comrades charities have benefitted in excess of R30-million through the generosity of runners, sponsors, supporters and the general public. Childhood Cancer Foundation (CHOC) supports children with cancer and life-threatening blood disorders and their families, improving early detection and facilitating effective treatment, by providing transport and accommodation near treatment facilities, financial support to low-income families, care giving, nutritional support, children’s play/rest and ward décor, toys, psychological and emotional support as well as bereavement programmes and funeral costs. The Community Chests of Durban and Pietermaritzburg distribute funding to 141 carefully screened, selected and monitored social welfare organisations, giving priority to early childhood development, informal settlements, rural and peri- urban areas and a focus on the poorest of the poor, between the cities of Durban and Pietermaritzburg. Hillcrest AIDS Centre Trust serves people impacted by HIV/AIDS by providing unconditional love and hope through practical and sustainable means. These include free medical care to patients in advanced stages of AIDS in a dignified caring environment, patient follow-up and adherence programmes, home-based care, an outpatient clinic, screening and primary healthcare. It also offers counselling, in-school prevention and education programmes. Hospice Palliative Care Association (HPCA) consists of 156 member hospices scattered throughout South Africa providing holistic quality and compassionate care to any person of any age with any life-limiting illness, in a variety of settings including hospice in-patient facilities, hospitals, hospice day- care facilities, community health facilities and patients own home care. Hospices provide dignity in death to patients and compassionate support to their loved ones. Wildlands Conservation Trust focuses on working towards a sustainable future for all, within the context of an increasingly fragile planet and the impact of climate change. Its philosophy is that community-based involvement and capacity-building and upliftment projects are key to saving the planet. Innovative projects include Trees for Life, Recycling for Life, Blue Fund, Ocean Stewards, Ubuntu Earth, Whale Time, Blood Lions, Project Rhino and many others. World Vision is a faith-based, global relief, development and advocacy organisation dedicated to working with children, their families and communities to overcome poverty and injustice. Its main focus is on child welfare health, education and child protection. Currently it runs 11 development programmes in six provinces that benefit 43 000 registered children. Advertorial Comrades charities focus on Have you entered to run? Did you know you can run and raise funds for a worthy cause? Did you #Race4Charity ? If you have run the Comrades Marathon and been part of the Race4Charity, please email us your story and it may be included in this feature. Send your story and running photo to rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za. Remember to include Race4Charity in the subject line CALLING ALL ROTARIANS
  • 11. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 11 Telephone 0861 100 963 email: info@championchip.co.za Web Site: www.championchip.co.za Please contact Jacqui or Colin and quote the reference: RA17001 if you represent a Rotary organized event to receive your Rotary discount on select services. Race Number Production Live Race Results and Tracking Event Promotion FREE UltimateLITE Results APP FREE Online entry to Events Event management solutions
  • 12. 12 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 District governors-elect got their first look at the 2018/19 presidential theme, Be the Inspiration, at the International Assembly, the annual training event held in San Diego in January. RI President- elect Barry Rassin urged the audience to build a stronger organisation by inspiring young people and spreading the word in their communities about the work Rotary does. “I will ask you to inspire with your words and with your deeds,” he said, “doing what we need to do today to build a Rotary that will be stronger tomorrow, stronger when we leave it than it was when we came.” One source of inspiration, Rassin said, has been Rotary’s work to eradicate polio. He described the incredible progress made in the past three decades: In 1988, an estimated 350 000 people were paralysed by the wild poliovirus. In 2017, just 22 cases were reported. “We are at an incredibly exciting time for polio eradication,” he said, “a point at which each new case of polio could very well be the last.” He emphasised that even when that last case of polio is recorded, the work won’t be finished; Rotarians must continue to dedicate themselves to immunisation and to disease surveillance programmes. “Polio won’t be over until the certifying commission says it’s over – when not one poliovirus has been found in a river, in a sewer or in a paralysed child, for at least three years,” he said. “Until then, we have to keep doing everything we’re doing now.” In recent years, Rotary has focused on sustainability in its humanitarian work. Now, Rassin said, Rotarians must acknowledge some hard realities about pollution, environmental degradation and climate change. He noted that 80 percent of his own country, the Bahamas, is within one meter of sea level. With sea levels projected to rise as much as 2 meters by 2100, he said, “my country is going to be gone in 50 years, along with most of the islands in the Caribbean and coastal cities and low-lying areas all over the world.” Rassin urged the leaders to view all of Rotary’s service as part of a whole. This means, he said, that the incoming governors must be an inspiration not only to the clubs in their districts, but also to their communities. “We want the good we do to last. We want to make the world a better place. Not just here, not just for us but everywhere, for everyone, for generations.” to leadINSPIRED
  • 13. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 13 All passionate and engaged Rotarians know that we are part of an extraordinary global organisation. We drive phenomenal projects and positively impact society. Only those who are familiar with our good works are aware of our powerful brand and how we can make a difference. Yet, as good as we feel we are, we do face threats. For example, the amount of effort to attract passionate members is tough as we face ever increasing competition for time and resources. There are many media savvy organisations who know how to tug heart strings and can raise lots of money for single focussed, short-term campaigns. We also live in a world of distraction, where high tech, digitally connected people have incredibly short attention spans. Rotary, in general is about long-term, sustainable impact.As an example, we have made such a significant contribution to the eradication of polio but the public has no knowledge of this. Polio is not seen as an issue by the media and social influencers, as the disease has faded from the memory of most adults and children are oblivious of its terrible impact. More modern scourges tend to make the headlines. Rotary’s strength of autonomous clubs making their own decisions about what projects to work on paradoxically weakens our capacity to grab headlines and attention. Individual club efforts are seen and forgotten with a swipe of a thumb across a Facebook wall. So how can we attract the attention that we need? In D9350, we believe that by collating the work of all the clubs in a district, we gather the information to really gain awareness. Rotarians do the work but fail to tell the stunning story of what we have done and how we have impacted society. The effort has numerous other benefits; we can produce reports for different audiences. Social media messaging with punchy stats should raise awareness. Local and provincial government and corporates with significant CSI budgets can get detailed reports that show Rotary’s influence, impact and skill set. Individual club efforts aren’t seen as newsworthy but when collated to district level we provide a good news story. Media focus is therefore enhanced. Each club also produces its own mini report and can use this as a tool to assess their effectiveness as well as a marketing tool to show potential members and donors. We also produce a district-wide project database and its objective is to enhance collaboration between clubs working in similar focus areas or neighbourhoods. D9350 has been working on producing a district report for the past four years. The uptake in the first few years was disappointing but each district governor was in favour of the concept and actively supported the collection of data. Clubs were somewhat sceptical about the benefits and concerned about the extra work required. Each year, we improved our communication and our data collection tool. Some clubs don’t like the idea of submitting some data to RI for presidential citations and other data to district. It also took a while for the district to incorporate the collection of data into its strategic thinking. Data collection was initially a one-person job but now plays a significant part of the district public image’s focus. To date, we have collected the information from clubs retrospectively. In August of each year, we ask clubs to provide us with information about projects carried out in the previous Rotary year. We provide a brief report back at the mini-conference in October and then work on the report which can be distributed widely. 2016/17 D9350 results. • For the first time over 50 percent of clubs reported their project activity. • Rotarians were involved in 497 separate projects, • R32.4m was spent on projects for our various beneficiaries. • 72 000 beneficiaries were reached by these projects. • Rotarians sit on the boards of trustees of 47 NGOs. • Rotarians did over 12 400 hours of volunteer time. • Over 90 percent of the beneficiaries are in the district. Some projects cover beneficiaries in other areas of Southern Africa. • Rotarians partnered with 116 organisations to develop and implement projects. • Clubs from most areas of our district reported and provided a broad understanding of activity throughout the huge district that includes the Western Cape, parts of the Northern Cape, Namibia and Angola. What are we doing with these results? This is the first year that we have a significant set of results. We publicised the results at the District’s mini- conference in October. We started marketing how good we are by launching a social media campaign to coincide with Rotary’s 113th birthday on 23rd February 2018. This campaign ran over four weeks. The first part of the campaign included six posters which made up an infographic. Over the following three weeks, club projects which represented some aspect of Rotary were shown. Brief summaries have been written about some of the projects and can be found From information to inspiration District 9350’s Janey Ball and Tony Davidson are heading up a project that’s using project data to create a buzz!
  • 14. 14 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 at www.rotarydpi9350.com/blog and on Facebook (Rotary International D9350). We are currently planning a more traditional marketing approach, using radio and community newspapers, a press release will be sent to the media in our district with geographically relevant project reports to highlight how Rotary has made a difference in that community. What lessons have we learnt? • Persistence is necessary. Convincing clubs that reporting and collating project information is beneficial to all concerned has taken four years. • We have become more strategic with our marketing to clubs. Our message, information to inspiration, struck a chord. • DG and district leadership have bought into the concept and have been very supportive. The AGs supported the project and helped the technologically-challenged Rotarians submit reports on spreadsheets. • Clubs which have been submitting reports every year, geared themselves up to report and found the process quick and simple. • The data project falls under the district public image portfolio and is seen as a crucial part of the DPI’s responsibility and is a key source of DPI material. • We are learning at each stage of the process. What next? Businesses realise that the intelligent use of data is critical to the success of an organisation. D9350 has started to see that this exercise has so many benefits and we will continue to collate reports on our projects. Rotary International also realised how powerful club data can be. We are aligning their requirements to those in our collection forms so that data only needs to be collected once. To date, the projects have been reported retrospectively after the end of a Rotary year. Less organised clubs battle to collate their information. Currently, we are reporting on projects with a lag of at least eight months. Annual reports should be made timeously and released as soon as possible after the year end. We have also been using very wide Excel spreadsheets, which are clumsy, but the data collection process is transforming to become more user friendly and current. Data can now be collected on a simpler to use Google form. These forms are available for download and can be filled out as soon as a project is completed. Once the transformation process is complete, the project information will become current. Our vision is to create a Southern African Rotary report, covering the activities of all clubs. From this, we can also create national reports. Imagine how inspirational our message to South Africans would be when we presented the country with a national overview of how Rotary serves the people? Should other districts want to join us in creating inspiration from information, please don’t hesitate to contact Janey Ball (janey@iafrica.com) or Tony Davidson (tondav@iafrica.com).
  • 15. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 15 Company Notice Rotary in Africa Reg. No.1971/004840/07 Notice to Members* Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of Rotary in Africa will be held at the company offices situated at 2 Prische House, 14 Church Road, Westville 3630, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa on Friday 11th May 2018, at 09h00. AGENDA 1. Call to order and announcements. 2. Confirmation of the minutes of the last Annual General Meeting held on Friday 19th May 2017. 3. Chairman’s report. 4. Editor’s report. 5. Treasurer’s report and submission of the annual financial accounts for the year ending 31st December 2017. 6. Appointment of auditors. 7. Election of up to 3 directors to serve on the Board. In terms of the company’s Articles of Association the following directors are due to retire from the Board: Andy Gray, Gregory Cryer and Natty Moodley. Being eligible, Andy Gray, Gregory Cryer and Natty Moodley will be available for election together with any other nominations received by close of business 04th May 2018. Nominations must be emailed directly to Rotary in Africa at rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za 8. To consider or transact any other business pertinent to an Annual General Meeting. *All current, immediate incoming and past Governors of Rotary Districts 9200, 9210, 9211, 9212, 9220, 9250, 9270, 9300, 9320, 9350, 9370 and 9400 are ex officio members of Rotary in Africa. A member may appoint a proxy to attend and vote on their behalf, provided such appointment is advised to the Secretary at the offices of the company at least 48 hours before the meeting. Natty Moodley - Secretary. 20 March 2018
  • 16. 16 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 Lillian Hopkins, the mother of Chester Woodhall of the Rotary Club of East London (D9370), has been attending most of his club’s weekly lunch meetings this year. Lillian celebrated her 100th birthday on 15 November 2017 and received a telegram of congratulations from Queen Elizabeth II, as well as a letter from the British Parliament. She has been a member of the Rotary Family since 1990 when, during a prolonged stay in the UK, Chester was instrumental in the charter of the Rotary Club of Wylde Green (D1060, England). Lillian’s husband and other son joined the new club and Lillian became a charter member of the Inner Wheel Club of Wylde Green. She is also a past president of the club. For the last 20 years, Lillian has led her club to allocate funding to purchase goods needed by various non-profit organisations in East London. She is considered a valued member of the Inner Wheel club and last year, the Rotary Club of Wylde Green recognised Lillian as a Paul Harris Fellow while the Inner Wheel club awarded her the Margaretta Golding award. The telegram of congratulations that Lillian Hopkins (below) received from Queen Elizabeth II on her 100th birthday. A ROTARY FAMILY STORY
  • 17. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 17 District 9210 enjoyed a record attendance of 74 Rotarians at this year’s Presidents-Elect Training Seminar (PETS) that was held at the Rotary Centre in Harare. The training, organised by the district training team and assistant governors, was ably led by District Governor-Elect Hutch Mthinda and District Trainer- Elect Marshal Chilenga. Mthinda opened the session by welcoming the Rotarians and unveiled the RI Theme for 2018/19, his district goals and the presidential citation. In addition to the three-hour grant management seminar, participants were taken though the use of on-line tools, strategic planning, public image, goal setting, membership and youth programmes. Rotarians were encouraged to network at club meetings and events and promote Rotary’s core values. Feedback from participants was that they felt more inspired to do good in the coming year. They also said they were ready to Be the Inspiration and share the inspiration to make a positive difference with other Rotarians and their communities. Members of the Rotary Club of Chitungwiza (D9210) attended and thoroughly enjoyed the presidents-elect training in Harare. With DGE Hutch Mthinda are Agnes Magunje and Rose Peters. INSPIRING PRESIDENTS-ELECT
  • 18. 18 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 Nearly 200 Rotarians attended the District 9370 AG and POETS training at St Augustine’s Priory and Conference Centre and were hosted by the Rotary Club of Ladybrand. After DGE Gianna Doubell welcomed the assistant governors (AGs) and introduced her team for the upcoming year, she said she considers Be the Inspiration to be a challenge to bring a new energy to the district and Rotary. “Like the energy of the waves can make a tremendous difference and huge impact to the shape of a coast line, we can do the same to our communities.” She asked the AGs, the majority of whom were first- timers, to encourage presidents to look out for “new blood and bring them up through Rotary.” She reminded the AGs of the importance of Rotarians connecting with Rotarians and not only those in their clubs. “We are part of a global organisation and we all need to be part of the bigger picture. It’s time to renew the energy in Rotary.” Days two and three were dedicated to president-elect and club officer training. A number of the clubs arrived with three or more delegates and some with as many as five. During the tea breaks there was much discussion on how the training would benefit all Rotarians, not just those taking office. The training format mirrored that of the Rotary Leadership Institute (RLI) training. Delegates were divided into breakaway groups of about 30 and allocated a training room. They sat at tables of six to discuss the topics and an individual was chosen to report back to the room. The varying opinions were then discussed as a room. At Friday night’s dinner, a surprise speaker was introduced to the Rotarians: Andre du Toit, who is also knownasTheBigPositiveGuy.Hismessageofoptimism was well received as he pointed out to delegates how negative thinking impacts on the interpretation of a situation and therefore, rational decision making. In a nutshell, looking for the positive in the situation makes you happier and open to smarter decision making! The next day started with the group breakaways and then moved to the hall for district business. Doubell asked Rotarians to remember that she is a district resource. “I have been trained; I have all the latest information. If you have questions, ask me! I have the answers. I want you to use my club visits to learn, to ask questions, to get answers. That is what is important. Rather than doing formal presentations and dinners, let’s do something different, like a beach breakfast.” District 9370 invited Rotary Africa to attend and report on its 2018 AG/POETS training... What a weekend of energising inspiration! By Sarah van Heerden Service, flexibility and fun Karen de Jager, Greg Cryer, Gianna Doubell and Bruce and Pippa Steele-Gray tallying the “loot” collected from the delegates for PolioPlus and the venue staff tips.
  • 19. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 19 After an interesting series of presentations, including the introduction of next year’s district conference and Rotary International Convention, the formalities of the weekend concluded and delegates left to prepare for the Caribbean theme dinner. That night, beach bums, pirates and island folk arrived to the rhythmic beats of a marimba band and found the venue festively decorated to theme. A few surprises were in store, such as Gavin Jepson in his hula skirt. The next morning, the delegates left to return home inspired and ready to energise their clubs with the message of flexibility, positivity and connectivity. DGE Gianna Doubell with one of the discussion groups at the assistant governor training . Island styling! Members of the Rotary E-Club of South Africa One, Irene Kotze and Gerald Sieberhagen, the chairman of Rotary Africa, enjoying the Caribbean festivities. Gianna Doubell asked Rotarians to “Ask me!” during her year.Angelique Timm and Gavin Jepson Want Rotary Africa to cover your event? Email rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za to find out how! The future is looking fab! DGE Gianna Doubell, DGN Jaco Stander, and DGND Maud Boikanyo.
  • 20. 20 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 A friendship exchange between Rotarians from D9400 and D3141 (Mumbai) was more of a magic carpet ride than a simple visit. The group, consisting of Carol Allais, Desire and Johan du Toit, Graham and Jenny Finbow, Liz Mackintosh, Cheryl Reum and Morris and Gill McClurg, spent nine unforgettable days seeing the sights of Mumbai and Aurangabad. Highlights of the trip included visits to the Hanging Garden, the Gateway of India, The Prince of Wales Museum, as well as various temples and churches. The group celebrated Holi at Vrindavan Farms, were treated to a meditation session at the Vipassana Pagoda and lunch at the prestigious Cricket Club of India. In Aurangabad the Rotarians visited the indescribable Ellora andAjanta caves (Hindu, Jain and Buddhist shrines, monasteries and temples carved into the mountainside dating back to 200 BC) and Bibi-Ka-Maqbara (the mini Taj Mahal that was built by Aurangzeb, the son of Shah Jehan). A group from D3141 will be visiting D9400 in October. INCREDIBLE INDIA The group with some of their hosts at the Hanging Gardens. Inside a sari shop. The head of the Buddha at the entrance of the Prince of Wales Museum.
  • 21. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 21 By Richard Brooks, Zone 20a (South) End Polio Now Zone Coordinator At the 2017 Governors’ Council of Southern Africa (COSA) meeting, a resolution was passed to support an initiative to arrange for volunteers to participate in Nigeria’s anti polio campaign. DG Adewale Ogunbadejo (D9110, Nigeria) welcomed the support of the COSA resolution to participate in Nigerian National Immunisation Days. The 2018 campaign will take place from 13 to 16 October (in the 18 northern states of Nigeria). Interested people may email me at richardbrooks149@hotmail.com. Rotary International set a goal to encourage all districts to give 20 percent of their DDF to PolioPlus. The goal for 2017/18 for the COSA districts was $91 584 and as at 16 February, the target had been exceeded and the COSA districts had given a total of $99 232. We have nearly eliminated polio. In 2017, there were only 22 reported cases of polio, eight from Pakistan and 14 from Afghanistan. The year before that, there were only 37 reported cases. The good news for Africa is that there were no cases reported in Nigeria since 2016! I need to emphasise that there is no room for complacency. During their national immunisation days, Pakistan plans to vaccinate 37 million children and Nigeria 26 million. Rotary, together with its global partners such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation play a pivotal role in funding this campaign. Another successful delivery of polio vaccines to an outlying area in Nigeria. 2018 SO FARAND IT’S LOOKING GREAT! Afghanistan 06Reported Cases 2015: 20 2016: 13 2017: 14 Pakistan 00Reported Cases 2015: 54 2016: 20 2017: 08 Nigeria 00Reported Cases 2015: 00 2016: 04 2017: 00
  • 22. 22 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 For far too many women in Malawi, there is very little to smile and get excited about while pregnant – poverty, disease, natural disasters and food insecurity make the thought of parenthood stressful. Coupled with the countries fast-growing population (51 percent, 6.8 million people, of the Malawian population are children), limited arable land and the high incidence of Malaria, women and children are becoming more vulnerable as their ability to recover from these unrelenting risks and shocks decreases. While the situation is dire, there is reason for hope as well, as the prospects for child survival have improved over the past few years. Prudent economic management, stable macroeconomic conditions and increasing agricultural production have helped reduce poverty and hunger, while the country’s HIV prevalence rate seems to have stabilised at 12 percent. The Rotary Club of Limbe (D9210) decided to bring smiles to the faces of expectant mothers and came up with the idea of Bags of Love. The club shared its idea with Leeds Grammar School in the United Kingdom and soon knitting needles were clicking away as Leeds residents made clothes for new born babies. These were packed into gift bags and given to mothers in maternity wards at the government hospitals around Blantyre. BAGS OF LOVEBy Mohamed Tayub
  • 23. Peace Dignity Hope April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 23
  • 24. 24 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 The idea of creating peace and a better life for the Khomani San may have seemed overly ambitious, but the members of the Rotary Clubs of Helderberg Sunrise, Upington (D9350) and Northcliff (D 9400), as well as those from 50 clubs in District 1800 (Germany), were certain it was possible. Life has never been easy for the Khomani San; there’s a long history of neglect, abuse and violation. Over thousands of years, their ancestors were pushed south and displaced by migrating people from further north in Africa. When the European settlers arrived, the San clans in South Africa and Namibia were further disseminated by appalling genocidal activities. They were regarded as vermin and hunted; the last permit to hunt a Bushman was issued in 1927. As their ancestral DNA markers date as far back as 40 000 years, the Khomani San constitute an important component of the few surviving aboriginal South African San. Plagued by poverty and a number of socio- economic issues, they were described by the South African Human Rights Commission (Inquiry into Human Rights Violations in the Khomani San report, 2004) as “A community fast losing hope, which often lacked the means and the ability to function and survive in a world so very different from that to which it is accustomed. We also found, at various levels, a sad story of neglect and of indifference.” The Khomani San – Living in Peace project was developed to change this. It began in the 2013/14 Rotary year when DG Wernt Brewitz (D1800) decided he wanted to undertake a project in Southern Africa that embodied the theme of Peace Through Service. With Dr Carl-Heinz Duisberg’s help, then-president of Helderberg Sunrise (2013/14), and the Peace Parks Foundation (PPF), the project was born. Rotarians designed this project to give the Khomani San a chance to live in peace, freedom, dignity and economic independence while retaining their traditional identity. To ensure sustainability, four sub-projects were designed with them and not for them. There are many buzz words surrounding this project but how do they translate into positive change for the Khomani San people who have been so greatly marginalised and neglected? Simply put, the four sub-projects contained within this project were designed to help the Khomani San help themselves develop as a community. Khomani tracker Am Am explaining spurs to tourists. Sunset at Erin Game Ranch.
  • 25. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 25 The Imbewu Camp in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park where the camps and veldskool workshops are held. The first sub-project, Khomani San Council capacity building, helped the San committees improve their problem solving, induce individual responsibility skills and included decision making and management skill development. The second, the development and management of the parks and farms, allowed for the people to follow a lifestyle that suits them and which preserves and monetises their culture. A commercial hunting package, using their traditional hunting methods, was designed for tourists and provided a unique attraction that was not offered elsewhere. The third sub-project, the eco-tourism programme, dealt with the development of two eco-camps in the desert landscape and the training of Khomani San to become guides who can pass on indigenous knowledge and their application to tourists. The fourth sub-project was the Veldschool and Imbewu programme. Veldschool is aimed at facilitating the intergenerational transfer of indigenous knowledge while reconnecting community members with ancestral land in the !Ae !Hai Heritage Park. Imbewu enables Khomani San elders to access their ancestral land to enjoy nature while getting closer to the “veld” as their ancestors of long time ago used to do. When asked if the project had made a difference to the Khomani San, Terance Fife, administrator of the Khomani San Community Property Association, explained: “The farm Erin is well on its way to being developed as a business that can employ local people. The staff employed through the project and at Erin farm now have regular income and are in a structured work environment.” He added, “The heritage, culture and language of PDG Francis Callard (D9400) and PDG Wernt Brewitz at the cultural training centre during a visit to the park last year.
  • 26. 26 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 the Khomani San have been sustained as there are now various programmes to ensure that the knowledge is passed on to future generations.” To fund the project, Wernt mobilised 50 Rotary clubs from D1800 to raise $64 935 while three clubs in South Africa (Helderberg Sunrise, Northcliff and Upington) raised $5 127. The three districts, D9350, D9400 and D1800, each contributed $42 468. Once the Global Grant application was approved, The Rotary Foundation provided $78 355 to the project. Through its Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), the German Government lent its support and donated $572 727, which brought the total funding to $763 637. “The support of the international partner club, the Rotary Club of Nienburg-Neustadt, and the members of its project committee, who gave advice, guidance and visited the project on a yearly basis, has been awesome,” said Duisberg. Last year, Rotarians visited the Khomani San and delivered a donation of knitted jerseys, beanies, scarves, TOMS Shoes and Msterio dolls. This initiative was made possible by Sesego Cares in partnership with the Rotary E-Club of Southern Africa D9400 and Msterio. The doll programme works to connect children by showing that giving is as great as receiving. Children design handcrafted gifts that are destined to travel to other children around the world. At each destination, the receiving children are encouraged to play with the gifts and enjoy them for a short time before the gifts travel on to their next destination. The children also write messages for each other on the dolls. Everyone along the way can track the gifts and see where they are and where they have been. Ultimately, after the gifts have travelled to many locations, they are given to a child in need somewhere in the world. MSTERIO provides all the materials, cleaning, sanitising, shipping and tracking of the gifts. Right: Annemarie Mostert and PDG Francis Callard during their visit to the park last year.
  • 27. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 27 VILLAGE BUILDERSPartnered with the Rotary Club of Shelton Skookum (D5020, USA), the Rotary Club of Durban Bay (D9370) helpedWozaMoya,aregisterednon-profitorganisation, to uplift a community in the southern Drakensberg. Once the funding was in place and the Global Grant approved, the project got underway. The first component was water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). It was decided to make Woza Moya and the adjoining Sinevuso High School a site of excellence for eco- toilets, hand washing and training. A child and maternal health component started with a programme called Stepping Stones, a community integrated management of childhood illness programme, in which community care workers (CCWs) learnt how to bring better skills and healthcare to mothers and children. This disease prevention and maternal education would reduce the area’s child mortality rate. The training also included gender, HIV/ AIDS, sex, love, communications and changing of mindsets to build a foundation for a productive family life. The third area of focus was economic development through sewing, knitting and skills training that was based on ideas fromAngela Shaw at the KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts. As a result of all the frantic learning and activity, there was a wonderful range of refreshing crafts with lion and sock monkeys ready for delivery to airport shops in South Africa and abroad. Fabric designed by the crafters is being used to make curtains and other goods. Greeting cards, bags and mats, based on their embroidery designs, are also being produced and sold. This project has already positively impacted on early health care, the understanding of relationships and communication including HIV/AIDS. Thirty adults have been employed and a large number of the youth have been educated about health, menstruation and hygiene. A child uses one of the Tippy Taps that were erected as part of the WASH component of the project. One of the woman who received training as part of the project. The crafts they make are sold by Woza Moya in airports, shops and at fairs and markets. Access to safe water from JoJo tanks and gutters now provides for more time for education, as school children no longer have to walk great distances to collect water. One of the eco-toilets that was built as part of the WASH component of the project.
  • 28. 28 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 During his daily morning commute to work, Spiro Mitchell, a member of the Rotary Club of Waterfront (D9350), noticed a young school boy pushing a smartly dressed woman in a wheelchair to a bus stop before sprinting to school. After witnessing this exercise a few times, Spiro grew concerned and stopped to speak with the disabled woman, Cleopatra Mathetha, and her son, Kamvaletho. Cleopatra, or Cleo as she is known, was brutally attacked and stabbed by a neighbour’s relative after she rebuffed his unwanted advances. The single mother of a one-year old was just 19 at the time. Cleo survived the horrific attack but was left a paraplegic. She refused to allow the attack and resulting paralysis to destroy her life. She remained employed at a medical supply factory and went on to have another son. Spiro took a photo of the two and WhatsApp’ed it to the club’s board with a request to add it to the agenda of the next board meeting. Before the board meeting, President Siham Boda contacted Bobby Barua, a friend from Johannesburg who serves as group counsel for one of the world’s largest engineering firms. Barua has significant physical disabilities but accepts no limitations to what he can achieve. Boda described him as one of the “most intelligent and determined people” she knows. She asked Barua for advice on where to source an electric wheelchair. He immediately offered her his spare electric wheelchair that he kept for emergencies and assured Boda it would be robust enough for road use. The only thing it was missing was a charger for the battery. She accepted the gift valued at R25 000. When he heard of the donation, Mitchell sprang to action and arranged for the wheelchair to be couriered to Cape Town. President Siham Boda, Cleopatra Mathetha and Spiro Mitchell. THE HEART OF A ROTARIAN Bobby Barua gave his spare electric wheelchair to Cleopatra Mathetha. SHAREYOURCLUBNEWSWITHROTARYINAFRICA Email stories, photos and captions to rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za Photos must be at least 1MB in size. Please make sure first and surnames are supplied
  • 29. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 29 More than 1 500 national and international para- athletes entered a wheelchair race in George. For 15 years, the Outeniqua Wheelchair Challenge has been successfully staged. During its first year the race only had 27 entries. The challenge was the first and only event to be staged exclusively for disabled athletes in South Africa. It is endorsed by the South African Sports Association for the Physically Disabled, South African Sports Confederation and Disability Sports South Africa. Every year, the number of entries has increased dramatically as disabled people in wheelchairs flock to compete in the annual event. The cumulative monetary and logistical support of Airports Company South Africa, George and George Municipality has helped ensure that this event is one which meets international standards. Athletes in racing wheelchairs, adapted bicycles, hand cycles, basketball chairs and ordinary wheelchairs take on the challenge which is not only about speed but also endurance. There are different race categories, including a 42.2 kilometre marathon, 21.1 kilometre half marathon, 10 kilometre race and five kilometre fun event. The Rotary Club of George (D9350) is proud to be part of this unique event. Previously, the club has helped by taking on the catering duties. This year was no different as Rotarians and partners gave a food parcel to each of the participants.insider T B D ½ h - 7" × 4.4375" VOYAGE. FORMATION. DÉCOUVERTE. TRAVEL. LEARN. GROW. TRAVEL. LEARN. GROW. Long-term exchanges build peace one young person at a time. Students learn a new language, discover another culture, and live with host families for a full academic year. Become a global citizen. Start in one of more than 100 countries. Long-term exchanges build peace one young person at a time. Students learn a new language, discover another culture, and live with host families for a full academic year. Become a global citizen. Start in one of more than 100 countries. Long-term exchanges build peace one young person at a time. Students learn a new language, discover another culture, and live with host families for a full academic year. Become a global citizen. Start in one of more than 100 countries. ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE LONG-TERM ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE LONG-TERM ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE LONG-TERM 海外体験。 学び。 奉仕。 TRAVEL. LEARN. SERVE. TRAVEL. LEARN. SERVE. 目標をもって海を渡り、異国での奉仕活動に参加し、短 期間の滞在で新しいスキルを学びたいと思う大学生やフ レッシュ社会人にとって、この上ない特別な経験ができる でしょう。 Professional development with a purpose: University students and young professionals learn new skills, learn a language, and take action through humanitarian service during short-term, customizable exchanges. Professional development with a purpose: University students and young professionals learn new skills, learn a language, and take action through humanitarian service during short-term, customizable exchanges. 新世代交換 NEW GENERATIONS SERVICE EXCHANGE NEW GENERATIONS SERVICE EXCHANGE TRAVEL. DISCOVERY. FUN. TRAVEL. DISCOVERY. FUN. TRAVEL. DISCOVERY. FUN. Short-term exchanges immerse young people in another culture. Some live with host families for up to three months, while others embark on a tour or go to camp for a few weeks. Go on an adventure in one of more than 100 countries. Short-term exchanges immerse young people in another culture. Some live with host families for up to three months, while others embark on a tour or go to camp for a few weeks. Go on an adventure in one of more than 100 countries. Short-term exchanges immerse young another culture. Some live with host f to three months, while others embark go to camp for a few weeks. Go on a one of more than 100 countries. ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE SHORT-TERM ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE SHORT-TERM ROTARY YOUTH EXCHANGE SHORT-TERM 目標をもって海を渡り、異国での奉仕活動に参加し、短 期間の滞在で新しいスキルを学びたいと思う大学生やフ レッシュ社会人にとって、この上ない特別な経験ができる VIAJES. AVENTURAS. DIVERSIÓN. SERVICE. FRIENDSHIP. FUN. SERVICE. FRIENDSHIP. FUN. Toma acción, promueve la comprensión internacional y forja nuevas amistades alrededor del mundo. Desarrolla tus aptitudes de liderazgo mientras descubres el poder de Dar de Sí antes de Pensar en Sí y cuan divertido es el verdadero liderazgo. Take action, build international understanding, and make new friends around the world. Develop your leadership skills while you discover the power of Service Above Self and find out how serious leadership can be seriously fun! Take action, build international understanding, and make new friends around the world. Develop your leadership skills while you discover the power of Service Above Self and find out how serious leadership can be seriously fun! Short-term exchanges immerse young people in another culture. Some live with host families for up to three months, while others embark on a tour or LIDERANÇA. INSPIRAÇÃO. DIVERSÃO. LEADERSHIP. INSPIRATION. FUN. LEADERSHIP. INSPIRATION. FUN. Descubra um mundo novo fora da sala de aula. Participe de um programa intensivo de liderança que se baseia em técnicas de comunicação, solução de problemas e maneiras de transformar o mundo num lugar melhor. Discover a world outside the classroom through an intensive leadership experience that builds communication skills, teaches creative problem- solving, and challenges you to change not only yourself but the world. Discover a world outside the classroom through an intensive leadership experience that builds communication skills, teaches creative problem- solving, and challenges you to change not only yourself but the world. INSPIRAÇÃO. DIVERSÃO. INSPIRAÇÃO. DIVERSÃO. INSPIRAÇÃO. Descubra um mundo novo fora da sala de aula. Participe de um programa intensivo de liderança que se baseia em técnicas de comunicação, solução de problemas e maneiras de transformar o mundo num lugar melhor. FORMATION. DÉCOUVERTE. FORMATION. DÉCOUVERTE. to three months, while others embark on a tour or go to camp for a few weeks. Go on an adventure in one of more than 100 countries. AVENTURAS. DIVERSIÓN. Toma acción, promueve la comprensión internacional y forja nuevas amistades alrededor del mundo. Desarrolla tus aptitudes de liderazgo mientras Dar de Sí antes de Pensar en Sí y cuan divertido es el verdadero liderazgo. another culture. Some live with host families for up to three months, while others embark on a tour or SERVICE. LEADERSHIP. ACTION. SERVICE. LEADERSHIP. ACTION. SERVICE. LEADERSHIP. ACTION. Join the global movement of young leaders taking action to build a better world. Exchange ideas with leaders in your community and mobilize your friends to develop innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing common challenges. Join the global movement of young leaders taking action to build a better world. Exchange ideas with leaders in your community and mobilize your friends to develop innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing common challenges. Join the global movement of young leaders taking action to build a better world. Exchange ideas with leaders in your community and mobilize your friends to develop innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing common challenges. Create your own promotional cards to showcase your youth activities. Available now in Rotary’s Brand Center. CREATE. SHARE. CONNECT. YouthProgramsCard_RotarianAD_halfpage.indd 1 2/6/17 2:32 PM GATHERING IN GEORGE
  • 30. 30 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 Lifecycle Week, the week leading up to the Cape Town Cycle Tour (CTCT), presents an opportunity for people from all walks (or wheels) of life to participate in the iconic event. Eighty people with disabilities participated in the CTCT’s newest pilot event, a wheelchair route of almost three kilometres around Green Point Stadium. The race served as an opportunity for participants to raise funds for the Cape Town Association for Physically Disabled (CTAPD) by collecting sponsorship for each entry. Organised by a CTCT partner, the Rotary Club of Claremont (D9350), the wheelchair event aimed to share the message that everyone, no matter their age or ability, can participate in the CTCT. “Each participant had between two and four friends supporting them and taking turns, much like in a relay, to push them around the course,” explained Liz Rose, president of the Rotary Club of Claremont. “Most of the participants only met their team on the day, creating a fantastic interaction opportunity while they decorated the wheelchairs to reflect the theme of Bling Your Ride.” “While wheels are a critical part of a bicycle they are equally important for a wheelchair; they give a differently abled person the freedom they deserve to move about. We are thrilled to support the Cape Town Association for Physically Disabled through this fundraising event and to help people with disabilities achieve true independence and inclusion in society,” said Rose. An ecstatic team crosses the finish line at the Cape Town Cycle Tour’s wheelchair event. The spirit at the event was remarkable as the teams cheered each other on towards the finish line. THE WHEEL WINNERS!
  • 31. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 31 Thirty-five people will be getting new wheelchairs from Rotary clubs in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands. Greg Cryer, a member of the Rotary E-Club of South Africa One (D9370), was instrumental in arranging the donation that was received by the Rotary Clubs of Pietermaritzburg, Hilton and Howick, Mooi River Midlands and E-Club of South Africa One. The wheelchairs were sourced from The Wheelchair Foundation UK, a non-profit organisation started by Rotary in Great Britain and Ireland that seeks to deliver a wheelchair to every child, teenager and adult who needs but cannot afford one and to give a new independence to those deprived of mobility by war, disease, accident, natural disaster or advanced age. More than 14 000 disabled South Africans have received wheelchairs from the foundation and altogether, more than 40 000 have been delivered to people all over the world. Long standing friends of District 9370, Elaine and PDG Milton Frary (of the Rotary Club of Wetherby and District, D1040) organised the supply of the wheelchairs. Together with four friends, Rachel and Louden Blair, Jay Middleton and his wife, Linda Lessy, the couple visited South Africa and toured the Midlands to visit the various beneficiaries. They visited Howick on a sunny Friday and were hosted by the Rotary Club of Hilton and Howick. After been taken to some of the local attractions including the Nelson Mandela Capture site by club members Janice Shipway and Sarah Paterson, the group moved to the more serious business of attending the official handover of 10 wheelchairs after lunch. On arriving at Sunfield Home they were met by Pat Draper of the Rotary E-Club of South Africa One. During the presentation they heard more about two of the beneficiaries; Sunfield Home Howick and Umgeni Hospital. Sunfield staff and Carl Haberman, the chairman of the Friends of Umgeni Hospital, were on Elaine and Milton Frary, Janice Shipway, Jay Middleton and his wife, Linda Lessey, and Rachel and Louden Blair at the Nelson Mandela Capture Site. A gift of independence
  • 32. 32 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 TIME WAITS FOR NO ONE Promote your business, club or district activities in ROTARY AFRICA Contact Rotary Africa at rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za or call 031 267 1848 • Reach our readers in English-speaking Africa • Advertise in ROTARY AFRICA • Distribute leaflets, brochures and newsletters with ROTARY AFRICA • Special rates for Rotary clubs, districts and Rotarian owned/managed business hand to meet the group. After a short presentation, the group toured the impressive facilities and were introduced to a number of the charming residents. They were interested to hear that many high-achieving South African para-athletes reside and train at Sunfield. The home’s mission is to provide a caring and a home-like environment for a wide spectrum of mentally disabled adults. In doing so, the home undertakes to involve its residents in appropriate training, occupational and recreational activities that will enhance their lifelong well-being. Umgeni Hospital is a specialised hospital in Howick that provides care for intellectually challenged persons with physical and multiple disabilities. The hospital caters for people of all races from three years of age and older within KwaZulu-Natal and the Friends of Umgeni Hospital works with hospital management to identify needs and support the hospital. The organisation ensures that the hospital has amenities that are not provided for by the government, promotes social and recreational activities and assists with funding for outings, parties and special events such as Christmas and Easter. After the tour, the group was met by members of the Rotary Club of Mooi River Midlands who hosted them for the weekend. Rachel Blair with two of the beneficiaries. Rachel runs and founded the charity Kindness in Action. Milton Frary and one of the residents during the tour of Sunfield Home Howick.
  • 33. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 33 On Thursday 23 February 1905, Paul Harris, Silvester Schiele, Hiram Shorey and Gustavus Loehr met in Room 711 of the Unity Building on Dearborn Street in Chicago and formed the first ever Rotary club, the Rotary Club of Chicago. To mark the 113th anniversary of Rotary, the Rotary Club of Msasa (D9210) decided to show Zimbabweans the difference that Rotary is making in their world. Many ideas were considered but it was eventually agreed that a Rotary Birthday Fun Run and Walk would best achieve its goals for the anniversary. As Rotary International has six main areas of focus, the Rotary Club of Msasa decided to choose six charities that best represented these areas of focus. The proceeds from the event were evenly divided between: • Water and Sanitation: Team Up to Clean Up Mbare • Conflict and Peace Resolution: Kites For Peace Zimbabwe • Basic Education and Literacy: Yellow Bus Trust • Economic and Community Development: St. Joseph’s House for Boys By Tatenda Tavaziva, the Rotary Club of Msasa (D9210) The event was all inclusive and people of all abilities were welcome to participate. Birthday fun day
  • 34. 34 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 • Maternal and Child Health: Baby Heroes Africa Foundation • Disease Prevention and Treatment: Project 127 The Rotary Club of Msasa is the sponsor club of the Interact Club of Gateway High School and this relationship was further cemented at this event. Gateway High School allowed the Rotarians to use the school as the race venue and the Interactors assisted as volunteers on the day. Rotaract clubs came on board with Belvedere Technical Teachers College (BTTC) and the Parirenyatwa School of Nursing (PARISON) to provide incredible manpower for the event. Saturday 24 February, was a day the Rotary Club of Msasa will never forget! The day’s schedule was fun- filled and family friendly with yoga specialist Jean-Paul Baron leading the crowd in stretches. The race started on time at exactly 7am and Star FM, one of the leading radio stations in the country, did a live outdoor broadcast from the venue. DJ Cuzindred provided entertaining music throughout the day and Kingdom Inflatables was on site with jumping castles for the children. The morning included Zumba with the well-known and energetic Zororo “Zorro” Nhira who got everyone dancing to his lively music and well-choreographed Zumba moves. More than $2 600 was raised from the 500 participants at the gate, while 50 volunteers and 15 corporate sponsors donated a combined total of $4 148. A fun Zumba session before the races got the pulses racing and the participants energised. Stand Up for the Champions! Tadiwa Gwede won the men’s five kilometre and Tinashe Muzhingi finished second in the men’s 10 kilometre race.
  • 35. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 35 Youth After returning from six weeks in France, Short- Term Rotary Exchange (STEP) student, Claire Cuthill, a Grade 11 pupil at Fish Hoek High School, reported back to the members of the Rotary Club Cape of Good Hope (D9350). Claire spent six weeks with her host sister, Agathe Pelhate, in the small town of Saint Martin Des Champs in Brittany, France, which is near the Mont Saint Michel. She spoke about the similarities and differences she experience in French life. One of the biggest differences was the school day of about eight hours with lunch served in the cafeteria. Each class was two hours long and there was a 20 minute break between classes. She was lucky to travel around the area and spent three days in Paris. Her good command of the French language made communication easy and added to the joy of her Rotary Youth Exchange. After six weeks in Italy, Hannah Watkinson and Ashley King of Grace College returned to the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands more confident and with many stories of their adventures abroad. The two Short-Term Rotary Youth Exchange students were sponsored by the Rotary Club of Hilton and Howick (D9370). “It shaped my life in ways I could never have imagined,” said King who was hosted in a small town near Naples. Watkinson was hosted in town near Milan in northern Italy. Her mother, Joanne, describes Hannah as a “real homebody” and said her family was surprised when she announced she wanted to take part in a youth exchange and said “I want to challenge myself.” “She wanted to do something that was uniquely hers. She came back completely confident,” said Joanne. Ashley and Hannah had each hosted their host sisters earlier in 2017. The four quickly became friends and had made plans to meet and explore while the two Grace College learners were in Italy. Highlights of their Italian adventure included learning Italian Christmas customs and exploring attractions such as Venice and Pompeii. Hannah Watkinson and Ashley King. Rotarian Maughreen Ladbrook, President Marge Upfold and Claire Cuthill with her parents, Lynne and John Cuthill. CLAIRE’S FRENCH ADVENTURE IMPRESSIVE ITALY Ashley & Hannah return from
  • 36. 36 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 The Rotary Club of Klerksdorp (D9370) held a Head Boy and Head Girl Dinner in February. They were given the topic of Fake News to discuss and highlighted many thought-provoking points. At the dinner are Schoonspruit High School educators Dries and Elsabe de Beer with Anroeschke Kleyn and Flipppie Greeff. Members of the St George’s Preparatory Interact Club visited Heatherbank Primary School. The Interact club is overseen by Jeff Ilsley, the Youth Service Director of the Rotary Club of Algoa Bay (D9370).
  • 37. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 37 Roundup El-Shamman House was started eight years ago by Allistair and Merencia Scholtz to care for babies aged between birth and two years of age. The couple’s motto is ‘unlocking hope’ and they passionately ensure that each abandoned baby has the building blocks for a happy and healthy life after adoption. Over the years, the Rotary Club of Bedfordview (D9400) has supported the home and provided it with items, such as a microwave, deep freeze, toys and clothing, from its wishlist. The club has adopted the home as an ongoing project and will continue to support it. Allistair and Merencia Scholtz recently visited the club and received a gift from the club’s Fillipa Heyneke and President Allan Rock. Vernon Naidoo of the Rotary Club of Algoa Bay (D9370) handing out some of the 45 wheelchairs the club obtained from Milton Frary of the Wheelchair Foundation in the UK. The wheelchairs were distributed to worthy recipients through organisations such as the Association for the Physically Disabled, Ubomi Ubotsha, Cheshire Homes, Missionvale Care Centre, Carehaven and Nazareth House. About 350 senior citizens from Paarl, Wellington and Hermon attended a free concert in the Paarl Town Hall. The annual event was organised by the Rotary Club of Paarl (D9350) and all the artists performed free of charge. With President Abie Martin (front centre) are Peter Van Niekerk (leader of the Peter Van Band), Karen (singer), John Koopman (comedian), Leon Coetzee (bass guitarist) and Dave Rawlings (drummer). Other artists were the African Percussion Band and soloists from the Frank Pietersen Music Centre, magician Chris Welsh and singers Felicity Kiran and Loren Erasmus.
  • 38. 38 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 The Rotary E-Club of South Africa One (D9370) donated an oxygen concentrator to the frail care unit at Damant Lodge in Port Alfred. At the handover are Sister Marion Kelly, Rotarian Tina Hon, Bruce Smith, Rotarian Mike Millard, Maria Milne, Rotarian Hans Hon and Christine Haworth. The funds were originally raised by the Rotary Club of Hamburg-International (D1890, Germany). “Damant Lodge required an oxygen machine for their Frail Care Unit, so we were given money to purchase the machine locally,” Hon said. The Rotary Club of Boksburg Lake (D9400) held an international dinner to celebrate the 113th anniversary of Rotary International in February. Fiona Martin (front) spoke passionately about orphaned chimpanzees and her volunteer work at chimp sanctuary Ngamba Island, Lake Victoria. With her is Elsa Venter of the Rotary Club of Boksburg Lake. Every year, the members of the Rotary Club of Algoa Bay (D9370) are kept extremely busy as they marshal the Fedhealth XTERRA triathlon.
  • 39. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 39 The Rotary Club of Kimberley South (D9370) received boxes of linen from Sun International which it donated, along with some books, to Caritas for distribution. At the handover are Elize von Bezing, Estie van der Merwe, Rob Gibson and Willie Goldblatt. Members of the Rotary Club of Bedfordview (D9400) are strong supporters of rhino conservation efforts. They recently had the opportunity to investigate the role the honorary rangers of the Kruger National Park play in saving the rhino. One of the things the honorary rangers have done is plant vegetable gardens to feed the full time rangers at outlying stations. The gardens are constructed using prefabricated structures, weld mesh and shade-cloth which keeps “unwanted critters” of all shapes and sizes out of the gardens and provides the rangers with a constant supply of fresh vegetables. The deployment of high-tech equipment and skilled anti-poaching reaction teams have helped decrease poaching over the last three years, from more than 1 000 a year in 2015 to 500 in the last year. The Rotarians were horrified to hear that at any given time, there are 12 or more teams of poachers active in the park. The club is investigating ways to assist the honorary rangers, who were represented by Andy Wright, Andrew Watt and Shaun O’Brian. With them is Jose Lourenco of the Rotary Club of Bedfordview.
  • 40. 40 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 A devastating fire at Moeggesukkel informal settlement in Uitenhage destroyed 17 homes and left many people homeless and destitute. The residents were given temporary shelter at Langa Hall but their most pressing need was food and the wherewithal to prepare it. The Rotary Club of Uitenhage South (D9370) rapidly responded and quickly collected several thousand rands worth of food and basic necessities that were delivered to the victims by Rotarians. The Rotary Club of Bloemfontein-Raadzaal (D9370) delivered 10 wheelchairs to MUCPP Community Health Centre in Bloemfontein. At the presentation are Laura Sello, Nina le Grange, LE Setlhare, Rod Jacobs, President Joe Bazirake and President Mike Mahase (of the Rotary Club of Bloemfontein-Thabure).
  • 41. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 41 WHICH CLUB MEETS TODAY directory 2018/19 Make sure your club’s correct details have been sent to Rotary Africa for inclusion in the new directory. Email rotaryafrica@mweb.co.za for more information The Rotary Club of Kimberley South (D9370) gave 10 new mattresses to Jannie Roux Children’s Home in Barkly West. At the presentation are Pat Green, Judith de Villiers, Elize von Bezing and Ingrid Human. A breakfast for residents at Laubscher Park Retirement Village was arranged by the Rotarians and Anns of the Rotary Club of Algoa Bay (D9370). At the breakfast are Naomi Stacey, Sandy Wells, Marlene Calder, Karen De Jager and Trevor Wells.
  • 42. 42 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 WELCOMED AND HONOUREDNEW MEMBERS, RECOGNITIONS AND AWARDS Koos Burger is a new member of the Rotary Club of Cape of Good Hope (D9350). Nathalie Owen is a new member of the Rotary Anns Club of Boksburg Lake (D9400). Kerry Lee Allen is a new member of the Rotary Club of Meyerton/Henley-on-Klip (D9400). Dave and Hayley Howard are new members of the Rotary Club of Kenton on Sea (D9370). Lukholo Badi received a Vocational Award from the Rotary Club of Algoa Bay (D9370). Kahesh Singh is a new member of the Rotary Club of Johannesburg South 101 (D9400). Nicky Savvides of the Rotary Club of Boksburg Lake (D9400) received the Avenues of Service Award. Johan and Pam Els are new members of the Rotary and Rotary Anns Clubs of Boksburg Lake (D9400). Maughreen Ladbrook is a new member of the Rotary Club of Cape of Good Hope (D9350). Aimee Kuhl is a new member of the Rotary Club of Cape of Good Hope (D9350). recognised
  • 43. April 2018 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ 43 ACCOMMODATION OFFERED *** B&B ACCOMMODATION in Kimberley. Staying over in Kimberley? The Nook B&B *** Semi-Self Catering B&B offers excellent accommodation and rates. All rooms luxury en- suite with private entrance and secure parking. Close to CBD and places of interest. For more info contact Rtn Rob Gibson at 072 116 8390 Web: www.thenookbnb.co.za ‘ABOVE THE WAVES’ IN SIMON’S TOWN! A self-catering, one-bedroom flat for 2 with sunroom and magnificent view of False Bay. A stone’s throw from the beach, close to Cape Point and the penguin colony in the picturesque, historical Simon’s Town. Off street parking, free WiFi. Flat R750p/n. Contact 021 786 3331 or peteandme@ mweb.co.za KIMBERLEY’S GUM TREE Lodge offers budget accommodation (200 Beds) from R180 pp in backpackers to R500 double en-suite. Meals in adjacent Gumtree Lodge Restaurant (Licensed). Your host Debbie. Tel: 053 832 8577, Cell 083 352 3822, Fax: 053 831 5409, E-mail: gumtreelodge@ telkomsa.net Website: www.gumtreelodge.com MISCELLANEOUS CONSTANTIABERG FUNERAL HOME: Sensitive, dignified and personal service by Alan Lindhorst – all hours, anywhere within 200km of Cape Town. Very reasonable prices & premiums. Cnr Kenilworth & Rosmead Ave, Kenilworth. 021 671 2400 or 083 653 6536. DISCLAIMER: All opinions published are not the opinion of the publisher. The publisher is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the opinions, information or advertisements in this publication. No responsibility is accepted for the quality of advertised goods or services or the accuracy of material submitted for reproduction. To the extent permitted by law, the publishers, their employees, agents and contractors exclude all liability to any person for any loss, damage, cost or expense incurred as a result of material in this publication.All Rotary Marks (Masterbrand Signature, Mark of Excellence and so forth),aswellasROTARYaretrademarksownedby RotaryInternationalandusedhereinunderlicence. SCOTTBURGH 122 en-suite rooms. Overlooking beach. Airport transfers arranged. Daily and evening entertainment. Special rates for seniors. Tel: 039 978 3361 Fax: 039 976 0971 Email: info@bluemarlin.co.za www.bluemarlin.co.za NEWLY REFURBISHED AMAKHOSICONTAINERSALES STORAGE : REFRIGERATED : CONVERSIONS BEST PRICESAND QUALITY : 3m, 6m, 12m 28 YEARS EXPERIENCE DENNIS WESLEY:0837336208dennisw@acsales.co.za Club of Boksburg DONATE a School Bag TODAYand help a child in need. “A School Bag For All” Campaign aims to provide underprivileged school children the necessary School Kit to enhance their dignity and encourage confidence. HELP KIDS IN NEED SUCCEED! ONLY R100 Join East Rand Stereo & Rotary Boksburgto support education. Contact Derek Fox on 082 886 0651 derek@succeedbrokers.com Noel Wauchope on 082 486 7330 noshawzz@global.co.za Stamp Collection FOR SALE South West African collection from 1897 Deutsch- Sudwestafrika issues to 1990 Flora, incl Postage Dues and Official Stamps. Virtually complete.All mint/ unmounted mint. Fully written up in loose leaf album. SACC catalogue value R313 391 Asking price R180 000 ono Email: terry@kiburuzo.co.za
  • 44. 44 ♦ Rotary Africa ♦ April 2018 Register today for World Water Summit 10 at www.wasrag.org WASRAG’s 10th summit will focus on two tracks. First – Helping Rotarians understand the issues in bringing water to health care facilities where medical staff lack clean water for maternity and child wards. Second – Learning how Rotarians are taking the lead in fighting and eradicating horrific waterborne diseases such as Guinea worm, schistosomiasis, and Rotary’s old enemy, polio. Whether you’ve done many WASH projects or would like to get started, you’ll find information and resources you can use. CONSUL SPONSORS EMISSARY SPONSORS Join us! 22 June 2018 Toronto, Canada