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Bully busters leading teachers

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Bully busters leading teachers

  1. 1. DON’T BULLY… BE A FRIEND! BAŞAK AYGÖREN EMİNE MALCI
  2. 2. Group Name: Bully Busters Group Members: Başak Aygören Emine Malcı Average Age: 22 Meeting Time: Every Thursday at 13.00 Meeting Point: North Campus’ Study
  3. 3. CONTENTS Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  4. 4. Matrix Diagram Mobbing in Schools Effects of Sports on School Success Using Music as a Learning Method Başak 7 6 3 Emine 7 5 4 Total 14 11 7
  5. 5. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  6. 6. Why did we select this topic? •Not respecting diversity in schools •Not having a healty relationships among peers, especially in teenagers •Not knowing the concept of «bullying» or «mobbing» •Not knowing the concept of «equality» •The effects of mobbing in the teenage years in schools •The serious effects of mobbing in the adolescence years in social life
  7. 7. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  8. 8. What is mobbing?
  9. 9. What is mobbing? •«Mobbing is the targeting of an individual or group of individuals within an organization or school and the subjecting of that individual or group of individuals to a series of abusive and humiliating behaviors.» (Duffy, Sperry, 2012) •Some typical examples of bullying are «name calling, put-downs, cruel teasing; saying or writing nasty things about others; deliberately excluding certain people from activities;not talking to certain people; threatening others with bodily harm; taking or damaging others' things; hitting or kicking; making people do things they don't want to do.» (Weinhold, Barry K., 2000)
  10. 10. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  11. 11. Defining Factors of Mobbing It is often difficult for even peers to identify who are the bullies and who are the victims because the vortex of violence is so prevalent and so many participate in it (Paulk et al., 1999). There are 6 factors to define mobbing: •Intent to harm •Intensity and duration •Power of the bully •Vulnerability of the victim •Lack of support •Consequences
  12. 12. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  13. 13. Physical Mobbing Physical mobbing is that strong people damage weak people physically and continuously with intention ◦ Slapping and kicking ◦ Punching ◦ Spitting ◦ Hair pulling http://typesofbullying.org/types-of-bullying-in-schools/
  14. 14. Verbal Mobbing Verbal mobbing is to hurt people’s feelings with verbs and insults. ◦ Jeering ◦ Swearing ◦ Bad nicknaming ◦ Humiliating ◦ Insulting the person or his family http://typesofbullying.org/types-of-bullying-in-schools/
  15. 15. Emotional Mobbing It damages the person’s social status, relationships and the feeling of belonging. ◦ Externalizing ◦ Abasement ◦ Discrimination http://typesofbullying.org/types-of-bullying-in-schools/
  16. 16. Sexual Mobbing Sexual mobbing is to consider a person as a sex object to satisfy sexual desires. ◦ Sexual Harassment ◦ Words including sexuality ◦ Molestation http://typesofbullying.org/types-of-bullying-in-schools/
  17. 17. Extensity of Mobbing Types Sexual 9% Emotional 18% Verbal 43% Physical 30% Sexual Emotional Verbal Physical
  18. 18. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  19. 19. Brown's Broken Toy Project The founder of Broken Toy Project, Tom Brown, brings to bullying awareness a raw and emotional program that in no uncertain terms, explains the severity of school bullying and the possible consequences of such behavior. Telling his own stories and allowing children to tell their own, plus putting to the audience numerous questions covering every aspect of school bullying, The Broken Toy Project is truly an interactive experience.
  20. 20. When he asked children what bullies told the children who are bullied; • new kids • fat kids • skinny kids • boys that "suck" in sports • boys that act like "fags" • lesbians • kids who are smart • kids who are dumb • Geeks • computer-freaks • kids who wear geeky out-of- style clothes • kids who stink and smell • teacher's pets • retarded kids • kids who talk funny • kids who walk funny • minority kids • kids in wheelchairs • kids who get good grades • kids who get poor grades • girls with blonde hair • kids with curly hair • kids with freckles • kids with funny looking ears or noses • kids with diseases • kids with unkempt hair
  21. 21. Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Feb. 2, 1996: Two male students in Moses Lake, Washington, were shot to death by a 14-year-old male honor student who had been the target of repeated bullying by those students. •Mar. 24, 1998: An 11-year-old boy and a 13-year-old boy shot and killed four girls and a female teacher in a Jonesboro, Arkansas, Middle School. They had made repeated threats to others in the school about their intent to do violence, but they were ignored. The 13year old was described as a bully. •Nov. 1998: Five Burlington, Wisconsin, boys were arrested for plotting the deaths of their teachers, administrators, and the other students who they said were picking on them. They told school officials that the other students "treated them like trash." http://www.timelines.ws/subjects/Taxes.HTML
  22. 22. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  23. 23. Some Statistics about Mobbing •The National Education Association estimates that 160,000 students miss school every day (totaling 28 million missed days per year), because of fear of attack or intimidation by a bully (Fried & Fried, 1996). •Students receive an average of 213 verbal put-downs per week, or 30 per day (Fried, personal communication, 1996). •69 percent of all students believe that schools respond poorly to bullying and victimization (Weinhold & Weinhold, 2000).
  24. 24. Some Statistics about Mobbing (Grades) (Olweus, 1994) •Bullying occurs in every grade, but it happens most frequently in grades 4 through 8. •Bullying usually starts as teasing and put-downs with younger bullies and then becomes more physical and more violent as bullies get older. •Bullies can be easily identified in each grade by the sixth week of the school year. •Potential bullies can be easily identified as early as preschool if we recognize the early warning signs.
  25. 25. Some Statistics about Mobbing (Gender)(Saunders, 1997) •Boys tend to use direct physical and verbal attacks to bully others. •Girls tend to use more indirect, subtle, and social methods such as exclusion, manipulation, and spreading rumors. •Boys tend to bully other boys (80 percent) and girls (60 percent). •In middle-school, girls who mature early are often bullied and sexually harassed by boys. •Girls tend to bully only other girls. •Boys usually bully alone, and girls bully in groups.
  26. 26. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  27. 27. Causes of Mobbing Social Family Personal School
  28. 28. Social Causes •«Hostility, envy, excessive competition and ambition, group pressure, disposition to humiliate or scapegoat someone, social changes and cultural traits have been indicated as social causes of mobbing» (Bilgel et al., 2006; Kök, 2006; Rayner and Hoel, 1997).
  29. 29. Family Factors •Children from violent homes are three to four times more likely to become bullies. Contrary to popular belief, most of the violence directed at young children in the home comes from the mother and older siblings (Straws & Gelles, 1988).
  30. 30. Personal Causes •«Personality, psychological state, personality disorders, individual traits, social skills, demographic traits and perceptual differences have been presented as the personal causes that may trigger mobbing» (Duffy and Sperry, 2007; Einarsen,1999; Leymann, 1993). •Bullies like to be in charge, dominate, and assert their power. They like to win at any cost (Olweus, 1993).
  31. 31. School Causes •A negative school climate where negative behavior gets most of the attention encourages the formation of cliques and bullying (Espelage et al., 1999). •25 percent of teachers see nothing wrong with bullying and put-downs. Schools often condone this behavior and do nothing to prevent bullying and put-downs (Olweus, 1994).
  32. 32. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  33. 33. Relations between Teachers and Students •Encouring bullies to understand victims’ perception. •Raising students’ awareness about mobbing. •Developing responsibility of sharing among students. •Supporting friendships among students. •Supporting personal and social development. •Creating a peaceful environment. •Raising awareness of diversity and leading students to be respectful. •Informing students about school rules.
  34. 34. Relations between Teachers and Students •Defining rewards and sanctions together. •Providing students to understand abstract concepts such as responsibility, democracy, courage,thinking and collaboration. •Being a role model with respectful and tolerant behaviors. •Imposing sanctions not physically towards the negative conclusions of behaviors which are not accepting as a violent. •Not using violence against bullies. •Being responsive about the efforts of being popular in the class.
  35. 35. Relations between Teachers and Parents •Informing parents about mobbing and organizing meetings. •Supporting them to be positive role models. •Incorporating parents which are sensitive about mobing in the process.
  36. 36. Relationships between Teachers and School •Informing school administration about mobbing. •Realizing that mobbing is a real problem involving the whole school and incorporating all employees in solution process. •Being careful about that sanctions which are imposed in schools are fair and consistent. •Investigating mobbing in school-wide. •Supporting school policies which decrease the risk of mobbing. •Showing zero tolerance towards mobbing. •Organizing activities which are open to all students.
  37. 37. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  38. 38. Consequences of Mobbing with regards to Bully •Suspension or being expelled •Escaping students from their duties, not having responsibility •In adolescence, continuing same behaviors turns into crimes
  39. 39. Consequences of Mobbing with regards to Victim •Decreasing the attention about school •Depression •Playing truant or quiting school •Discipline problems •Decreasing self-esteem •Blaming yourself •Bullying others •Desire for revenge •Suicide attempts
  40. 40. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  41. 41. Education SchoolFamily Lack of education Wrong education system Relation between siblings Relation between peersRelation between parents Egoism Personal Competition Why do students have a tend to bully their peers? Relation between teachers FISHBONE DIAGRAM
  42. 42. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram Gantt Chart •Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  43. 43. GANTT CARD
  44. 44. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart Survey •Conclusions & Suggestions
  45. 45. SURVEY •Questions: • Educational Status • Gender • How do you define your relationship between your parents? • Did you get bullied in primary school? • If yes, how do you define the type of mobbing? • If yes, how did you feel when you faced with this situation? • Did you bully in primary school? • If yes, how do you define the type of mobbing? • If yes, how did you feel after the incident?
  46. 46. Educational Status 0 1 43 3 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Elementary High School Undergraduate Graduate Post Graduate
  47. 47. Gender 34 16 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Women Men
  48. 48. How do you define your relationship between your parents? 19 27 0 4 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Loving & Rule-based Loving & Permissive Distant & Rule-based Distant & Permissive
  49. 49. Did you get bullied in primary school? 22 28 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Yes No
  50. 50. If yes, how do you define the type of mobbing? 13 6 0 3 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Verbal Physical Cyber Sexual
  51. 51. If yes, how did you feel when you faced with this situation? •Ambitious •Bad •Powerless •Desperate •Scared •Decreasing my self-esteem •Outsider •Humiliated •Sad •Hateful •Nervous •Anger •Distress •Unlovable
  52. 52. Did you bully in primary school? 7 43 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Yes No
  53. 53. If yes, how do you define the type of mobbing? 5 1 1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Verbal Physical Cyber Sexual
  54. 54. If yes, how did you feel after the incident? •Bizarre •Childish •Cruel •Regretful •Cool
  55. 55. CONTENTS •Matrix Diagram •Why did we select this topic? •What is mobbing? •Defining Factors of Mobbing •Types of Mobbing •Real Life Examples of Mobbing •Statistics about mobbing •What are causes of mobbing? •What can be done to prevent mobbing? •Consequences of mobbing •Fishbone Diagram •Gantt Chart •Survey Conclusions & Suggestions
  56. 56. Conclusions & Suggestions ‘’ The effects of mobbing are always loss-loss of dignity, loss of respect, loss of status, loss of personal identity, loss of professional identity, loss of job, loss of money, loss of friendship and social networks, loss of family support, loss of health insurance, loss of health, loss of life.’’ (Duffy, Sperry, 2012) Therefore; Realizing that mobbing is a serious and demanding topic. Showing zero tolerance towards mobbing.
  57. 57. It is important for everyone in the community to work together to send a unified message against bullying.  Establish a school safety committee or task force to plan, implement, and evaluate your school's bullying prevention program. Create a mission statement, code of conduct, school-wide rules, and a bullying reporting system. Establish a school culture of acceptance, tolerance and respect. Use staff meetings, assemblies, class and parent meetings, newsletters to families, the school website, and the student handbook to establish a positive climate at school. Build bullying prevention material into the curriculum and school activities. Train teachers and staff on the school’s rules and policies. Give them the skills to intervene consistently and appropriately. Conclusions & Suggestions
  58. 58. Special Thanks to Hayal Köksal…

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