Transparency as Cure for the Resource Curse? A Nigerian Case Study

20,399 views

Published on

A case study of the Nigerian resource curse and it\'s underlying causes with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
20,399
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
123
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transparency as Cure for the Resource Curse? A Nigerian Case Study

  1. 1.                 School  of  Social  and  Political  Sciences     The  University  of  Melbourne       POLS40011     Political  Science  Thesis       Transparency  as  Cure  for  the  Resource  Curse?       A  Nigerian  Case  Study                   Sebastian  Hancock     134922    
  2. 2.      
  3. 3.                                Oil   creates   an   illusion   of   a   completely   changed   life,   life   without   work,   life   for  free…The   concept   of   oil   expresses   perfectly   the   eternal   human   dream   of   wealth  achieved  through  lucky  accident…In  this  sense  oil  is  a  fairy  tale  and  like  every  fairy  tale  a  bit  of  a  lie.     Ryzard  Kapuscinki1                                                                                                                      1  Quoted  in  Michael  Watts,  ‘Resource  Curse?  Governmentality,  Oil  and  Power  in  the  Niger  Delta,  Nigeria’,  Geopolitics,  Vol.  9,  No.  1,  2004,  p.  51.     1  
  4. 4.       2  
  5. 5.        Contents      Acknowledgements   5    List  of  Abbreviations   7    Chapter  1:  Introduction   9    Chapter  2:  The  Resource  Curse  and  the  EITI   16    Chapter  3:    The  Slide  into  the  Resource  Curse   34    Chapter  4:  Social  and  Political  Causes   59    Chapter  5:  Transparency  as  Cure?   69    Chapter  6:  Analysis  and  Conclusions   73    Bibliography   77             3  
  6. 6.       4  
  7. 7.       This  thesis  is  dedicated  to  the  loving  memory  of  Ruth  Hanley,     and  to  the  strength  of  the  Hanley  family.          Acknowledgements      I  am  heavily  indebted  to  my  thesis  supervisor,  Dr.  Tom  Davis,  whose  input,  advice,  encouragement,  and  above  all  patience,  have  been  invaluable  during  the  past  year.    I  would  also  like  to  thank  Susan  Allen,  Simon  Lands,  and  George  Hancock  for  reading  all  or  sections  of  this  thesis  at  various  stages  of  its  production,  and  providing  useful  suggestions  and  corrections.    Thanks  are  also  due  to  the  University  of  Melbourne,  and  to  the  School  of  Social  and  Political  Sciences  in  particular,  for  providing  both  the  opportunity  to  complete  this  thesis,  and  the  resources  to  do  so.    Lastly,  I  would  like  to  thank  Clare  Hanley,  not  only  for  taking  the  time  to  comment  on  this  work,  but  for  all  her  love  and  support  throughout  a  difficult  year  for  us  both,  without  which  none  of  this  would  have  been  possible.         Sebastian  Hancock     5  
  8. 8.       6  
  9. 9.  List  of  Abbreviations      CCB     Code  of  Conduct  Bureau    CCT     Code  of  Conduct  Tribunal  CPI     Corruption  Perception  Index  EITI       Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative        EFCC     Economic  and  Financial  Crimes  Commission  GDP     Gross  Domestic  Product            G8     Group  of  Eight      HDI     Human  Development  Index    ICPC     Independent  Corrupt  Practices  and  Other  Related  Offences  Commission  IMF     International  Monetary  Fund          NEITI     Nigerian  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative  NGOs     Non-­‐Governmental  Organizations    NNPC     Nigerian  National  Petroleum  Corporation    NPC     Northern  People’s  Congress    NPN     National  Party  of  Nigeria      OPEC     Organization  of  Petroleum  Exporting  Countries        TI     Transparency  International    UN     United  Nations          WB     World  Bank         7  
  10. 10.         8  
  11. 11.  Chapter  1:  Introduction     Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa,  home  to  13  percent  of  the  world’s  population,  currently  contributes  only  3.3  percent  of  global  Gross  Domestic  Product  (GDP).    Growth  and  development  have,  moreover,  been  sluggish  at  best.    As  a  result,  in  the  only  region  in  the  world  where  poverty  has  increased  in  the  past  25  years,  up  to  60  percent  of  the  population  live  on  less  than  US$1.25  per  day.2    This  is  despite  the  fact  that  sub-­‐Saharan  Africa  holds  seven  percent  of  the  world’s  oil  reserves,  not  to  mention  large  deposits  of  other  valuable  primary  commodities  such  as  gold,  diamonds,  and  minerals.    Yet  in  spite  of  this  apparent  wealth,  of  the  177  countries  contained  within  the  United  Nations  (UN)  Human  Development  Index  (HDI),  sub-­‐Saharan  African  countries  are  consistently  ranked  lowest.3     The  inability  to  achieve  significant  social  and  economic  development  amidst  enormous  resource  wealth  is  a  phenomenon  widely  known  as  the  ‘resource  curse’.4    Though  it  extends  to  resource-­‐rich  developing  countries  across  the  globe,  it  is  generally  accepted  that  sub-­‐Saharan  African  countries  have  fared  the  worst  from  this  ‘disease’.    The  resource  curse  manifests  itself  in                                                                                                                  2  Hazel  M.  McFerson,  Extractive  Industries  and  African  Democracy:  Can  the  "Resource  Curse"  be  Exorcised?’,  in  International  Studies  Perspectives,  Vol.  11,  2010,  p.  335.  3  Ibid,  p.  336.  4  Richard  Auty  first  coined  the  term  ‘resource  curse’  in  1993.    Richard  M.  Auty,  Sustaining  Development  in  Mineral  Economies:  The  Resource  Curse  Thesis,  London,  Routledge,  1993,  pp.  1-­‐6.    The  relationship  is  also  commonly  described  as  the  ‘paradox  of  the  plenty’,  a  reference  to  the  title  of  Terry  Lynn  Karl’s  seminal  work.    Terry  Lynn  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty:  Oil  Booms  and  Petro-­‐States,  Berkeley,  University  of  California  Press,  1997.    The  term  resource  curse  will  be  used  for  the  remainder  of  this  study.     9  
  12. 12. economic  stagnation,  political  instability,  conflict,  corruption,  institutional  and  societal  failure,  and  ultimately  underdevelopment.5    Nowhere  has  its  effects  been  more  virulent  than  in  Nigeria,  where  enormous  oil  wealth  exists  alongside  internal  conflict,  economic  collapse,  extreme  poverty,  endemic  corruption,  instability,  and  long  periods  of  authoritarian  and  predatory  rule.6    Currently,  Nigeria’s  UN  HDI  rating  of  0.423  (with  1  being  the  highest  score)  ranks  it  well  below  other  oil  producing  states  such  as  Saudi  Arabia  (0.800)  and  Indonesia  (0.697).7     The  current  global  response  to  the  resource  curse,  including  its  manifestation  in  Nigeria,  is  centred  on  the  energy  governance  framework  known  as  the  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative  (EITI).    Launched  by  Tony  Blair  in  2002  at  the  World  Summit  on  Sustainable  Development  in  Johannesburg,  the  EITI  seeks  oil-­‐sector  transparency  via  the  voluntary  publishing  of  government  revenues  originating  from  resource  extraction  companies.    Under  the  EITI  framework,  countries  firstly  obtain  ‘candidate’  status  by  successfully  meeting  benchmarks  for  four  signup  indicators.    Once  completed,  the  country  can  secure  ‘compliant’  status  by  producing  regular  validation  reports  showing  the  aforementioned  flows  of  revenue.8    By  undergoing  this  process  it  is  felt  that                                                                                                                  5  See  for  example,  Helen  M.  McFerson,  ‘Governance  and  Hyper-­‐Corruption  in  Resource-­‐Rich  African  Countries’,  Third  World  Quarterly,  Vol.  30,  No.  8,  2009,  p.1529-­‐1545.  6  Ibid,  pp.  1540-­‐1542.  7  When  adjusted  for  income  inequality  this  figure  plummets  to  0.246.    This  ranking  puts  Nigeria  at  142  out  of  169  countries  measured.    Saudi  Arabia  and  Indonesia  are  ranked  at  55  and  108  respectively.    Nigerian’s  currently  have  a  life  expectancy  of  just  48.4  years.    United  Nations  Development  Programme,  International  Human  Development  Indicators,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/  countries/profiles/NGA.html.    8  EITI  signup  indicators  –  ‘1.  The  government  must  issue  an  unequivocal  public  statement  of  its  intention  to  implement  EITI.    2.  The  government  must  commit  to  work     10  
  13. 13. civil  society  organizations  in  compliant  countries  will  be  able  to  use  the  release  of  revenue  information  to  hold  their  governments  to  account,  thereby  reducing  corruption  and  institutional  failure,  and  helping  to  cure  the  resource  curse.9         Nigeria  is  often  presented  as  a  test  case  for  the  effectiveness  of  the  EITI  framework.    Over  80  percent  of  Nigeria’s  oil  revenue  has  historically  gone  to  only  one  percent  of  the  population,  largely  due  to  systematic  corruption  and  graft.10    The  cumulative  effect  of  this  enrichment  has  been  the  loss  of  resources  that  could  have  been  invested  in  social,  economic  and  cultural  development.11    After  returning  to  democratic  governance  in  1999  following  prolonged  periods  of  military  rule,  the  incumbent  government  signed  up  to  the  EITI  framework,  completing  the  process  by  achieving  compliant  status  on  2  March  2011.12    Although  significant  progress  has  been  made  towards  oil-­‐sector  transparency,  the  entrenched  nature  of  systematic  corruption  and  the  failure  of  weak  civil  society  organizations  in  Nigeria  to  respond  purposefully  to  the  publishing  of                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              with  civil  society  and  companies  on  EITI  implementation.    3.    The  government  must  appoint  a  senior  individual  to  lead  on  EITI  implementation.    4.  The  government  must  publish  and  make  widely  available  a  fully  costed  Work  Plan  containing  measurable  targets,  a  timetable  for  implementation  and  an  assessment  of  capacity  constraints.’    Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Signup,  retrieved  8  March  2011,  available  from  <http://eiti.org/eiti/  implementation/signup>.    For  candidate  status  requirements  see  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Country  Implementation,  retrieved  8  March  2011,  available  from  <http://eiti.org/eiti/implementation>.  9  Daniel  M.  Firger,  Tranparency  and  the  Natural  Resource  Curse:  Examining  the  New  Extraterritorial  Information  Forcing  Rules  in  the  Dodd-­‐Frank  Wall  Street  Reform  Act  of  2010’,  Georgetown  Journal  of  International  Law,  Vol.  41,  2010,  pp.  1064-­‐1067.  10  Adekunle  Amuwo,  ‘Towards  a  New  Political  Economy  of  the  Niger  Delta  Question  in  Nigeria’,  Politikon,  Vol.  36,  No.  2,  2009,  p.  241.  11  S.O.  Osoba,  ‘Corruption  in  Nigeria:  Historical  Perspectives’,  Review  of  African  Political  Economy,  Vol.  23,  No.  69,  1996,  p.  383.  12  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative,  Press  Release:  Six  More  Countries  Compliant  with  Transparency  and  Accountability  Standard,  2  March  2011,  p.  1,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://eiti.org/news-­‐events/press-­‐release-­‐six-­‐more-­‐countries-­‐compliant-­‐transparency-­‐and-­‐accountability-­‐standard>.     11  
  14. 14. information  under  this  framework  raises  doubts  about  the  EITI’s  ability  to  cure  the  resource  curse  in  this  country.13     This  study  will  address  the  question  of  how  effective  the  EITI  as  a  global  governance  mechanism  can  be  in  ‘curing’  the  resource  curse.    It  will  attempt  to  answer  this  question  through  an  inductive  case  study  method  focusing  on  Nigeria.    It  will  ask:  To  what  degree  has  the  historical  weight  of  specific  social  and  political  factors  in  Nigeria  entrenched  its  distinct  manifestation  of  the  resource  curse  within  its  socio-­‐political  structures?      It  will  analyse  the  historical  interplay  of  ethnic  division,  endemic  and  systematic  corruption,  and  violent  competition  for  the  state  in  Nigeria  in  order  to  uncover  root  causes  for  developmental  failure  and  the  resource  curse.    Given  the  results  of  this  analysis,  this  study  will  ask  whether  the  voluntary  EITI  framework  is  indeed  wholly  inadequate,  and  whether  deep  structural  and  cultural  change  is  in  fact  required  in  order  for  resource  abundance  to  be  turned  into  positive  developmental  outcomes.     Nigeria  has  been  selected  as  the  subject  of  this  case  study  as  it  meets  the  criterion  of  ‘typicality’  required  for  assessing  the  general  effectiveness  of  the  EITI.    The  presence  of  extensive  oil  reserves,  along  with  the  country’s  status  as  one  of  the  most  corrupt  in  the  world,14  has  made  Nigeria  both  a  typical  case  of  the                                                                                                                  13  Ayo  Obe,  ‘The  Challenging  Case  of  Nigeria’,  in  Ann  Florini  (ed.),  The  Right  to  Know:  Transparency  for  an  Open  World,  New  York,  Columbia  University  Press,  2007,  p.  147.  14  As  at  2010,  Nigeria  was  134th  out  of  178  countries  listed  under  Transparency  International’s  Corruption  Perception  Index.    Transparency  International,  Corruption  Perceptions  Index  2010,  Berlin,  Transparency  International,  2010,  p.  13,  retrieved  16  March  2011,  available  from  <http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/  surveys_indices/cpi  /2010/in_detail>.     12  
  15. 15. resource  curse,  and  a  test  case  for  the  capacity  of  the  EITI  framework  to  alleviate  the  disease.15    Nigeria  therefore  satisfies  John  Gerring’s  requirement  that  the  typical  case  be  representative  of  a  broader  set,  allowing  for  insight  into  some  broader  phenomenon.16     The  use  of  case  study  methodologies  within  the  scholarly  literature  on  the  resource  curse  is  severely  lacking.    Instead,  the  vast  majority  of  research  has  taken  the  form  of  cross-­‐country  correlation  analysis.    Yet  the  sole  use  of  the  latter  methodology  can  be  inadequate  due  to  its  inherent  limitations.    For  instance,  the  uncovering  of  correlations  in  datasets  does  not  necessarily  aid  in  the  formation  of  causal  models,  nor  in  dealing  with  complexity.17    It  is  these  very  limitations  that  correspond  to  the  advantages  of  case  study  research.    For  whereas  statistical  analysis  is  the  process  through  which  conclusions  are  drawn  about  the  existence  of  characteristics  in  a  population  through  study  of  a  sample,  logical  inference  from  case  study  data  is  the  process  whereby  conclusions  regarding  the  essential  linkage  between  those  characteristics  are  made  in  terms  of  a  ‘systematic  explanatory  schema’  or  theory.18    The  two  methodologies  can  therefore  be  thought  of  as  complementary,  adding  to  a  deeper  understanding  of  social  forces  through  concurrent  usage.                                                                                                                    15  Alexandra  Gillies,  Obasanjo,  the  Donor  Community  and  Reform  Implementation  in  Nigeria’,  Round  Table,  Vol.  96,  No.  392,  2007,  pp.  570-­‐572.  16  John  Gerring,  Case  Study  Research:  Principles  and  Practices,  Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  2007,  p.  91.  17  Ibid,  pp.  3-­‐4.  18  J.  Clyde  Mitchell,  Case  and  Situation  Analysis’,  in  Matthew  David  (ed.),  Case  Study  Research:  Volume  II,  London,  SAGE,  2006,  p.  72.     13  
  16. 16. This  is  not  to  say  that  case  study  research  has  no  limitations  of  its  own.    There  can  be  no  doubt,  for  example,  that  the  interpretation  of  case  study  data  lacks  the  level  of  objectivity  obtainable  in  statistical  analysis.    Yet,  the  possibility  of  ‘noisy,  fallible,  and  biased’  results  does  not  necessarily  preclude  the  attainment  of  knowledge;  rather,  it  requires  a  critical  reading  with  bias  in  mind.19           In  order  to  address  the  issues  described  above,  this  study  has  been  separated  into  sections.    In  chapter  two  I  will  discuss  the  status  of  the  literature  surrounding  the  resource  curse  and  its  relationship  to  the  EITI  framework,  while  identifying  areas  in  which  I  feel  the  literature  is  lacking.    In  chapter  three  I  will  provide  an  overview  of  the  ongoing  historical  process  in  Nigeria,  and  the  effect  the  entry  of  oil  had  on  that  process.    This  overview  will  draw  upon  the  available  primary  and  secondary  sources,  the  former  largely  being  documents  related  the  to  the  EITI  and  its  Nigerian  counterpart,  the  Nigerian  Extractive  Industries  Transparency  Initiative  (NEITI),  and  the  latter  consisting  of  works  on  Nigerian  social  and  political  history,  regional  case  studies,  and  analyses  of  particular  aspects  of  the  Nigerian  socio-­‐political  system.    In  chapter  four,  I  will  analyse  the  specific  social  and  political  factors  drawn  out  of  that  overview,  and  the  effect  they  have  had  on  the  specific  manifestation  of  the  resource  curse  in  Nigeria.    From  the  results  of  this  analysis  I  will  assess,  in  chapter  five,  the  suitability  of  the  EITI  framework  as  a  cure  for  the  resource  curse.    In  the  final  chapter,  I  will  draw                                                                                                                  19  Campbell,  Donald  T.,  "Degrees  of  Freedom"  and  the  Case  Study’,  in  Matthew  David  (ed.),  Case  Study  Research:  Volume  III,  London,  SAGE,  2006,  p.  138.     14  
  17. 17. some  conclusions  from  this  study  in  relation  to  the  questions  outlined  above,  and  to  the  status  of  the  literature  on  the  resource  curse  and  the  EITI.         15  
  18. 18.  Chapter  2:  The  Resource  Curse  and  the  EITI       Over  the  last  two  decades,  a  significant  body  of  literature  has  emerged  which  seeks  to  explain  the  seemingly  contradictory  relationship  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  poor  development  outcomes,  often  referred  to  as  the  resource  curse.    Within  this  body  of  literature,  three  separate  sub-­‐literatures  can  be  identified:  natural  resources  and  economic  stagnation;  natural  resources  and  civil  war;  and  natural  resources  and  governance  failure.    While  this  thesis  sits  within  the  latter  of  the  three,  it  is  important  first  to  address  the  development  of  the  resource  curse  theory.    From  Consensus  to  Curse     During  the  1950s  and  1960s,  prominent  development  economists  had  argued  that  developing  countries  were  suffering  from  an  imbalance  in  the  factors  of  production,  caused  by  an  oversupply  of  labour,  and  a  shortage  of  capital.    As  such,  countries  with  abundant  natural  resources  were  in  an  advantageous  position;  through  exploitation  of  these  resources,  Walter  Rostow  and  others  argued,  their  economies  would  ‘take-­‐off’  thanks  to  the  capacity  of  primary  exports  to  raise  capital  and  attract  foreign  investment.20    While  there  were  a                                                                                                                  20  For  an  example  of  this  argument  see  Walter  Rostow,  The  Stages  of  Economic  Growth:  A  non-­‐Communist  Manifesto,  Cambridge,  Cambridge  University  Press,  1960,  p.  39;  see  also  W.  Arthur  Lewis,  The  Theory  of  Economic  Growth,  London,  Allen  and  Unwin,  1955,  p.  52,  where  he  argues  that  not  only  did  natural  resources  lead  to  better  development     16  
  19. 19. number  of  radical  economists  who  challenged  this  view,  their  underrepresentation  in  global  development  bodies  negated  their  ability  to  alter  the  overriding  consensus.21    On  the  contrary,  the  oil  boom  years  of  the  1970s,  which  led  to  soaring  prices  and  a  glut  of  capital  in  oil  exporting  countries,  solidified  natural  resources  as  a  ‘blessing’  within  the  emerging  neoliberal  mainstream.22     With  the  collapse  of  oil  prices  in  the  early  1980s  and  the  economic  stagnation  amongst  exporters  that  followed  it,  this  ‘blessing’  began  to  be  seriously  questioned.    Indeed,  the  majority  of  resource-­‐rich  developing  countries,  with  the  notable  exception  of  the  East  Asian  economies,  had  not  experienced  accelerated  growth  on  the  back  of  resource  booms.    Moreover,  having  geared  their  economies  towards  primary  exports,  many  were  left  heavily  dependent  upon  volatile  global  markets  for  national  income.23    At  the  same  time,  conflict                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              outcomes,  but  ‘[m]uch  of  the  world’s  economic  history  can  be  written  very  simply  in  those  terms.’  21  For  example  see  H.  W.  Singer,  The  Distribution  of  Gains  between  Investing  and  Borrowing  Countries’,  American  Economic  Review,  Vol.  40,  No.  2,  1950,  pp.  482-­‐483,  and  Raúl  Prebisch,  The  Economic  Development  of  Latin  America  and  its  Principal  Problems,  New  York,  United  Nations  Department  of  Economics,  1950,  pp.  8-­‐14,  who  argued  that  exporters  would  suffer  from  declining  terms  of  trade  in  the  long  term.    See  also  Jonathan  V.  Levin,  The  Export  Economies:  Their  Pattern  of  Development  in  Historical  Perspective,  Cambridge,  Harvard  University  Press,  1960,  pp.  186-­‐202,  who  argued  that  due  to  the  boom  and  bust  nature  of  resource  markets,  and  correspondingly  sharp  price  fluctuations,  resource  exporters  would  be  left  with  volatile  domestic  economies,  leading  to  unreliable  foreign  exchange  supplies  and  a  poor  investment  climate.  22  Andrew  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse:  A  Literature  Review,  Brighton,  Institute  of  Development  Studies,  University  of  Sussex,  2006,  p.  9.    For  an  example  of  neoliberal  arguments  on  natural  resource  backed  ‘take-­‐off’  see  Bela  Balassa,  The  Process  of  Industrial  Development  and  Alternative  Development  Strategies,  Princeton,  Princeton  University  Press,  1981,  pp.  2-­‐4,  and  P.J.  Drake,  Natural  Resources  Versus  Foreign  Borrowing  in  Economic  Development’,  Economic  Journal,  Vol.  82,  No.  327,  1972,  pp.  951-­‐952.  23  As  Isham  et  al.  have  shown,  since  1980  developing  countries  dependent  upon  natural  resource  exports  suffered  significant  and  ongoing  slowdowns  in  economic  growth,  while  manufacture  exporters  have  experienced  no  such  slowdown.    Jonathan  Isham  et  al.  The     17  
  20. 20. and  political  instability  were  rife,  signalling  a  general  malaise,  especially  in  the  case  of  sub-­‐Saharan  Africa.24    This  failure  to  produce  positive  development  outcomes  initiated  renewed  debate  on  the  concept  of  ‘take-­‐off’,  and  sparked  the  emergence  of  resource  curse  theory.     Numerous  empirical  studies  have  since  been  undertaken  by  economists  in  an  effort  to  confirm  the  existence  of  the  resource  curse.    These  studies  have  largely  taken  the  form  of  cross-­‐country  statistical  analysis  in  an  effort  to  uncover  significant  correlations  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  a  variety  of  indicators  for  poor  economic,  political,  and  social  outcomes.    The  most  influential  of  these  studies,  Jeffrey  Sachs’  and  Andrew  Warner’s  seminal  1995  work  Natural  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Growth,  found  that  a  one  standard  deviation  increase  in  the  ratio  of  natural  resource  exports  to  GDP  in  developing  countries  is  associated  with  a  decrease  of  just  less  than  one  percent  in  annual  per  capita  growth.25    In  the  years  following,  several  other  studies  appeared  which  produced  similar  results,  albeit  with  variations  in  datasets  and  measurements.26    While                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Varieties  of  Resource  Experience:  Natural  Resource  Export  Structures  and  the  Political  Economy  of  Economic  Growth’,  World  Bank  Economic  Review,  Vol.  19,  No.  2,  2005,  p.  143.  24  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  p.  1-­‐2.  25  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs  and  Andrew  M.  Warner,  Natural  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Growth,  National  Bureau  of  Economic  Research  Working  Paper  5398,  Cambridge,  National  Bureau  of  Economic  Research,  1995,  p.  8.    Specifically,  Sachs  and  Warner  found  a  one  standard  deviation  increase  led  to  a  0.93  percent  per  annum  reduction.        26  See  for  example  Alan  H.  Gelb,  Oil  Windfalls:  Blessing  or  Curse?,  New  York,  Oxford  University  Press,  1988,  pp.  221-­‐223,  who  found  a  statistically  significant  relationship  between  the  size  of  natural  resource  endowments  and  growth  of  output;  Richard  M.  Auty,  Introduction  and  Overview’,  in  Richard  M.  Auty  (ed.),  Resource  Abundance  and  Economic  Development,  Oxford,  Oxford  University  Press,  2001,  p.  3,  who  found  that  per  capita  incomes  in  resource-­‐poor  countries  grew  between  two  and  three  times  faster  than  resource-­‐rich  countries  between  1960  and  1990;  and  Carlos  Leite  and  Jens  Weidmann,  Does  Mother  Nature  Corrupt?    Natural  Resources,  Corruption  and  Economic  Growth,  Washington,  International  Monetary  Fund,  1999,  p.  29,  who  focused  on  oil     18  
  21. 21. these  findings  have  certainly  generated  controversy,27  Sachs  and  Warner,  in  reviewing  the  evidence  for  the  research  curse  in  2001,  asserted  that  while  not  ‘bulletproof’,  empirical  support  for  its  existence  is  nonetheless  ‘quite  strong’.28    With  its  existence  largely  confirmed,  attention  has  concentrated  on  the  causal  mechanisms  of  the  resource  curse,  leading  to  the  creation  of  three  sub-­‐literatures.    Sub-­‐Literature  1:  Economic  Structure     The  first  sub-­‐literature  focused  on  observed  economic  stagnation,  and  suggested  structural  deficiencies  as  the  explanatory  variable.    The  most  prominent  model  put  forward  was  the  ‘Dutch  Disease’,  which  describes  the  negative  effect  resource  booms  can  have  on  the  growth  of  non-­‐resource  sectors  of  the  economy  (manufacturing  and  agriculture  for  example)  and  refers  to  the  experience  of  The  Netherlands  following  the  discovery  of  natural  gas  in  the  late                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              exporters,  and  concluded  that  a  one  standard  deviation  increase  in  Sachs’  and  Warner’s  ratio  led  to  a  0.6  percent  decrease  in  output  growth.    27  See  for  example  Daniel  Lederman  and  William  F.  Maloney,  Neither  Curse  Nor  Destiny:    Introduction  to  Natural  Resources  and  Development’,  in  Daniel  Lederman  and  William  F.  Maloney  (eds.),  Natural  Resources:  Neither  Curse  nor  Destiny,  Palo  Alto,  Standford  University  Press,  2007,  p.  3,  who  found  that  natural  resources  in  fact  stimulate  growth,  if  measurements  for  natural  resource  abundance,  other  than  Sachs’  and  Warner’s,  are  used;  Christa  N.  Brunnschweiler,  Cursing  the  Blessings?  Natural  Resource  Abundance,  Institutions,  and  Economic  Growth’,  World  Development,  Vol.  36,  No.  3,  2008,  pp.  412-­‐413,  who  used  natural  resource  allocation  per  capita  and  found  that  between  1970  and  2000  there  was  a  positive  and  direct  effect  on  real  GDP  growth;  and  Graham  Davis  Learning  to  Love  the  Dutch  Disease:  Evidence  from  the  Mineral  Economies’,  World  Development,  Vol.  23,  No.  10,  1995,  pp.  1774-­‐1777,  who  found  that  by  some  measures  such  as  infant  mortality,  life  expectancy,  and  the  UN’s  HDI,  they  have  actually  outperformed  non-­‐mineral  economies.  28  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs  and  Andrew  M.  Warner,  The  Curse  of  Natural  Resources’,  European  Economic  Review,  Vol.  45,  No.  4,  2001,  p.  828.     19  
  22. 22. 1950s.29    Yet  as  Michael  Ross  argues,  structural  economic  mechanisms  such  as  the  Dutch  Disease  tend  to  ignore  the  positive  effect  corrective  government  policy  could  have,  and  fail  to  explain  why  such  action  is  not  undertaken.30    For  as  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler  have  pointed  out,  natural  resources  have  led  to  accelerated  development  in  Malaysia  and  Botswana,  not  to  mention  Norway  and  Australia,  rather  than  to  manifestations  of  the  resource  curse.31    In  response  to  such  criticisms,  two  further  sub-­‐literatures  emerged  which  attempted  to  identify  broader  causal  mechanisms  underlying  the  merely  economic  and  structural.32    Sub-­‐Literature  2:  Curse  and  Conflict     The  second  sub-­‐literature  on  the  resource  curse  focuses  on  natural  resource  abundance  and  the  occurrence  and  duration  of  civil  wars  in  resource-­‐rich  countries.    Several  studies  have  sought  to  establish  a  positive  correlation  between  the  two  using  cross-­‐country  analysis.    For  instance,  Collier  and  Hoeffler,  in  a  1998  study  of  98  countries  and  27  civil  wars,  found  this  relationship  to  be                                                                                                                  29  Specifically,  due  to  booms  in  the  resource  sector,  productive  resources  are  drawn  away  from  other  tradeable  sectors  of  the  economy  towards  ‘non-­‐tradable’  sectors  such  as  services,  thereby  shrinking  productive  output.    Michael  Burno  and  Jeffrey  D.  Sachs,  Energy  and  Resources  Allocation:  A  Dynamic  Model  of  the  "Dutch  Disease"’,  Review  of  Economic  Studies,  Vol.  XLIX,  1982,  pp.  845-­‐846.    See  also  W.  Max  Corden  and  J.  Peter  Neary,  Booming  Sector  and  De-­‐Industrialisation  in  a  Small  Open  Economy’,  Economic  Journal,  Vol.  92,  No.  368,  1982,  pp.  825-­‐842;  and  Peter  J.  Neary  and  Sweder  van  Wijnbergen,  Natural  Resources  and  the  Macroeconomy:  A  Theoretical  Framework’,  in  J.  Peter  Neary  and  Sweder  van  Wijnbergen  (eds.),  Natural  Resources  and  the  Macroeconomy,  Oxford,  Basil  Blackwell,  1986,  pp.  13-­‐45.  30  See  Michael  L.  Ross,  What  Do  We  Know  About  Natural  Resources  and  Civil  War?’,  Journal  of  Peace  Research,  Vol.  41,  No.  3,  2004,  pp.  306-­‐307.  31  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  Rents,  Governance,  and  Conflict’,  Journal  of  Conflict  Resolution,  Vol.  49,  No.  4,  2005,  p.  627.    For  a  good  examination  of  the  case  of  Botswana  see  Daron  Acemoglu  et  al.,  An  African  Success  Story:  Botswana,  CEPR  Discussion  Paper  3219,  London,  Centre  for  Economic  Policy  Research,  2002.  32  Michael  L.  Ross,  Review:  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse’,  World  Politics,  Vol.  51,  No.  2,  1999,  p.  303-­‐308.     20  
  23. 23. positive,  which  they  would  confirm  in  two  subsequent  studies  of  2004  and  2009.33    Mary  Kaldor,  Terry  Lynn  Karl  and  Yahia  Said,  who  examined  oil  specifically,  argued  that  these  civil  wars  should  be  thought  of  as  ‘new  oil  wars’,  for  unlike  those  of  the  20th  century  in  which  oil  was  seen  as  a  strategic  resource,  requiring  territorial  control  or  at  the  very  least  influence  over  host  governments,  these  new  wars  are  essentially  fought  over  access  to  resource  rents.    According  to  the  authors,  conflict  arises  due  to  different  groups  within  countries  seeking  control  over  the  economic  gains  generated  from  oil  exploitation.    This  rent-­‐seeking  behaviour,  and  the  conflict  that  ensues,  negatively  affects  economic  growth,  leads  to  institutional  failure,  a  predatory  political  culture,  and  ultimately  the  resource  curse.34        Sub-­‐Literature  3:  The  Curse  of  Political  Structures     The  third  sub-­‐literature  on  the  resource  curse,  and  the  one  in  which  this  study  is  broadly  located,  focuses  on  what  Karl  terms  the  ‘political/institutional  phenomenon’  of  the  resource  curse.35    As  it  became  increasingly  clear  that  economic  mechanisms  alone  failed  to  explain  the  existence  of  a  resource  curse,  the  literature  has  since  the  mid-­‐1990s  progressively  shifted  toward  explanations  focused  on  governance  failures.    These  explanations  emphasize  abundance  as  the                                                                                                                  33  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  ‘On  Economic  Causes  of  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic  Papers,  Vol.  50,  No.  4,  1998,  p.  571.    In  their  two  subsequent  studies  the  data  sets  were  greatly  expanded,  with  their  results  holding  regardless.    See  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  Greed  and  Grievance  in  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic  Papers,  Vol.  56,  No.  4,  2004,  pp.  563-­‐588;  and  Paul  Collier  and  Anke  Hoeffler,  Beyond  Greed  and  Grievance:  Feasibility  and  Civil  War’,  Oxford  Economic  Papers,  Vol.  61,  No.  1,  2009,  pp.  13-­‐24.  34  Mary  Kaldor  et  al.,  Introduction’,  in  Mary  Kaldor  et  al.  (eds.),  Oil  Wars,  London,  Pluto  Press,  2007,  pp.  2-­‐26.  35  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  p.  257.     21  
  24. 24. root  cause  of  institutional  collapse,  corrupt  government  practices,  and  rent-­‐seeking  behaviour,  which  in  turn  act  as  both  cause  and  effect  of  the  resource  curse.    Resource  wealth,  moreover,  allows  political  elites  to  maintain  control  of  corrupt  and  inefficient  systems  through  excessive  spending  on  military  and  internal  security  capacities,  as  well  as  political  support.36    For  these  theorists,  natural  resource  abundance  is  associated  with  low  levels  of  democracy  and  democratic  values,  which  helps  to  preclude  development  for  the  majority.37     A  number  of  studies  have  found  a  correlation  between  natural  resource  abundance,  particularly  in  the  case  of  point-­‐source  resources  such  as  oil,  and  low  levels  of  democracy.    In  a  study  of  113  countries  from  1971-­‐1997,  Ross  found  that  the  presence  of  extensive  oil  reserves  in  particular  has  a  detrimental  effect  on  democracy  in  developing  countries.38    Nathan  Jensen  and  Leonard  Wantchekon,  who  conducted  a  survey  of  46  sub-­‐Saharan  countries  between  1970  and  1995,  also  found  that  countries  with  higher  levels  of  resource  dependency  tended  to  be  authoritarian  compared  with  those  less  reliant  on  natural  resource  endowments.    Further,  following  the  ‘third  wave’  of  democratization  in  the  region,  those  resource-­‐rich  countries  tended  to  revert  to  authoritarian  rule  over  time.39    These  and  other  studies  confirmed  a  positive                                                                                                                  36  Gavin  Hilson  and  Roy  Maconachie,  "Good  Governance"  and  the  Extractive  Industries  in  Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa’,  Mineral  Processing  &  Extractive  Metallurgy  Review,  Vol.  30,  2009,  pp.  61-­‐62.    Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  20-­‐22.  37  See  for  example,  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  pp.  14-­‐18;  Hazem  Beblawi,  The  Rentier  State  in  the  Arab  World’,  in  Hazem  Beblawi  and    Giacomo  Luciani  (eds.),  The  Rentier  State,  New  York,  Croom  Helm,  1987,  pp.  49-­‐62  in  relation  to  the  Middle  East;  and  Nathan  Jensen  and  Leonard  Wantchekon,  Resource  Wealth  and  Political  Regimes  in  Africa’,  Comparative  Political  Studies,  Vol.  37,  No.  7,  2004,  pp.  834-­‐836  in  relation  to  Africa.  38  Michael  L.  Ross,  What  Do  We  Know  About  Natural  Resources  and  Civil  War?’,  Journal  of  Peace  Research,  Vol.  41,  No.  3,  2004,  p.  342.  39  Jensen  and  Wantchekon,  ‘Resource  Wealth  and  Political  Regimes’,  p.  836.       22  
  25. 25. correlation  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  non-­‐democratic  governance.40     Explanations  for  this  correlation  have  focused  on  the  detrimental  effects  of  economic  rents  associated  with  resource  extraction,  and  the  subsequent  establishment  of  ‘rentier  states’.    While  rent  in  the  broadest  sense  of  income  derived  from  ownership  of  natural  endowments  is  present  in  all  economies,  the  ‘rentier  state’  is  a  more  detrimental  phenomenon.    Hossein  Mahdavy,  the  first  to  develop  the  concept,  defined  the  ‘rentier  state’  as  one  in  which  a  significant  proportion  of  national  income  is  derived  from  external  economic  rents.41    Hazem  Beblawi,  observing  the  phenomenon  across  the  oil-­‐producing  Arab  states,  expanded  upon  this  concept,  arguing  that  ‘rentier  states’  are  not  only  characterized  by  the  reliance  upon  such  rents,  but  that  the  gains  derived  are  produced  for  the  benefit  of  a  relatively  small  proportion  of  the  population,  who  are  coalesced  around  the  state.    The  remainder  of  the  population,  being  excluded  from  the  generation  of  wealth,  are  engaged  only  in  its  ‘distribution  and  utilisation’.42         Various  mechanisms  through  which  the  rentier  state  gives  rise  to  the  resource  curse  have  been  advanced.    This  thesis  can  be  located  amongst  those  deemed  ‘state-­‐centric’,  though  others  have  also  done  important  work  on                                                                                                                  40  For  an  overview  of  many  to  the  studies  not  mentioned  here,  see  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  20.  41  Mahdavy  developed  the  concept  in  relation  to  pre-­‐revolutionary  Iran.    Hossein  Mahdavy,  ‘Patterns  and  Problems  of  Economic  Development  in  Rentier  States:  The  Case  of  Iran’,  in  M.  A.  Cook  (ed.),  Studies  in  Economic  History  of  the  Middle  East:  From  the  Rise  of  Islam  to  the  Present  Day,  Oxford,  Oxford  University  Press,  1970,  p.  428-­‐429.      42  Beblawi,  ‘The  Rentier  Sate  in  the  Arab  World’,  pp.  50-­‐52.     23  
  26. 26. cognitive  and  societal  mediation.43    A  prominent  example  of  the  state-­‐centric  approach  is  Karl’s  Paradox  of  the  Plenty.    In  it  she  argues  that  the  origin  of  state  revenue  determines  all  levels  of  governance,  and  hence  the  ability  of  the  state  to  foster  economic  growth.    As  decision-­‐making  and  governance  in  the  rentier  state  are  based  upon  linkages  between  power  and  abundance,  accumulation  and  rent  seeking  become  the  mainstay  of  political  activity,  and  define  the  nature  of  the  state  itself.      Special  interests,  social  classes,  and  negative  patterns  of  action  form  around  oil  rents,  and  competition  for  control  of  the  state  becomes  paramount.44    For  Karl,  the  particular  characteristics  of  oil,  including  its  enclave  nature,  high  capital  requirements,  and  strategic  value,  produces  an  extreme  form  of  the  rentier  state’s  institutional  setting,  which  she  terms  the  ‘petro-­‐state’.45     As  indicated  above,  once  a  rentier  or  petro-­‐state  has  been  established,  state-­‐centric  approaches  argue  that  the  tendency  will  be  towards  authoritarian  forms  of  rule.    For  Ross,  three  causal  mechanisms  mediate  this  relationship  –  the  rentier  effect  (the  combined  use  of  rent  distribution  and  low  taxes  in  order  to  impede  democratization),  the  repression  effect  (the  use  of  resource  rent  wealth  to  build  up  internal  security  apparatuses)  and  the  modernization  effect  (the  absence  of  social  and  cultural  changes  towards  democracy  brought  about  by  sustained  economic  development).46    It  is  this  ‘executive  discretion’  over  the  distribution  of  rents  that  helps  to  bring  down  democracies  and  sustain  authoritarian  rule.    Competition  for  the  state  can  be  contained  only  by  (resource                                                                                                                  43  See  Ross,  ‘Review:  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse’,  pp.  309-­‐312.  44  Karl,  The  Paradox  of  Plenty,  pp.  14-­‐15.  45  Ibid,  p.  15-­‐17.  46  Michael  L.  Ross,  Does  Oil  Hinder  Democracy?’,  World  Politics,  Vol.  53,  No.  3,  2001,  pp.  332-­‐337.     24  
  27. 27. rent  financed)  authoritarian  and  military  repression.47    This  argument  is  consistent  with  the  findings  of  Benjamin  Smith,  who  found  that  countries  abundant  in  oil  wealth  tend  to  exhibit  fewer  instances  of  civil  war  and  anti-­‐state  protest  alongside  high  regime  stability,  as  a  result  of  the  presence  of  rents.48         At  the  heart  of  these  approaches,  therefore,  is  the  corrupting  influence  of  rents  derived  from  natural  resource  abundance,  and  the  negative  effect  this  influence  has  on  the  nature  of  the  state,  and  on  development  generally.    Little  attention  is  given  to  the  ways  in  which  external  power  forces  related  to  geo-­‐political  and  geo-­‐economic  environments  help  shape  the  resource  curse  in  producing  countries.49    Neglecting  the  Subject     Two  key  points  can  be  made  regarding  the  above  literature  for  the  purposes  of  the  current  study.    Firstly,  at  the  heart  of  the  majority  of  work  on  the  resource  curse  sub-­‐literature  lie  the  relative  size  of  a  country’s  resource  endowment,  and  the  rents  it  generates,  as  the  explanatory  variables.    As  a  result  there  is  a  tendency  to  ignore  the  specific  social  and  political  context  into  which  resource  extraction  penetrates.50    This  is  not  to  say  that  impediments  to  development  that  can  arise  in  specific  contexts,  such  as  ethnic  division  and  instability  for  example,  are  not  acknowledged  as  an  important  mediator  in  the                                                                                                                  47  Jensen  and  Wantchekon,  ‘Resource  Wealth  and  Political  Regimes’,  pp.  834-­‐836.  48  Benjamin  Smith,  ‘Oil  Wealth  and  Regime  Survival  in  the  Developing  World,  1960-­‐1999’,  American  Journal  of  Political  Science,  Vol.  48,  No.  2,  2004,  pp.  235-­‐243.  49  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  22  50  Ibid,  p.  23;  Watts,  Resource  Curse?’,  p.  75.     25  
  28. 28. relationship  between  natural  resource  abundance  and  the  nature  of  governance  in  these  countries.    But  too  often  they  are  seen  as  being  determined  by  the  resource  base,  rather  than  having  historical  roots  specific  to  each  country.51    In  order  to  understand  better  the  discrepancy  between  the  results  of  oil  exploitation  in  different  countries,  the  effects  of  oil  on  specific  social  and  political  factors  needs  to  be  explored.     Secondly,  the  shift  in  the  resource  curse  debate  towards  the  role  of  host  country  governance  has  left  the  literature  relatively  silent  on  issues  external  to  those  countries.52    One  such  issue,  which  will  also  be  focused  on  here,  is  the  role  of  global  energy  governance  in  precipitating,  extenuating,  and  perhaps  curing  the  resource  curse.    This  issue  will  be  addressed  in  the  following  section.    As  will  be  shown,  it  is  on  the  findings  of  the  resource  curse  literature,  at  least  in  part,  that  global  responses  have  been  based.    The  EITI  framework  is  the  current  global  governance  response  to  poor  development  outcomes  amongst  the  resource-­‐rich,  and  it  is  to  this  issue  and  its  associated  literature  that  we  now  turn.                                                                                                                    51  Rosser,  The  Political  Economy  of  the  Resource  Curse,  p.  10.    There  are  a  few  exceptions  to  this  neglect.    See  Gwenn  Okruhlik,  Rentier  Wealth,  Unruly  Law,  and  the  Rise  of  Opposition:  The  Political  Economy  of  Oil  States’,  Comparative  Politics,  31,  3,  1999,  p.  309,  who  points  out  that  the  character  of  state  institutions  are  mainly  shaped  prior  to  the  imposition  of  oil;  Watts,  ‘Resource  Curse?’,  pp.  53-­‐4,  who  argues  that  ‘petro-­‐capitalism’  produces  new  forms  of  rule  and  political  authority  as  it  interacts  with  pre-­‐existing  social  and  political  factors;  and  Kiren  Aziz  Chaudhry,  ‘Economic  Liberalization  and  the  Lineages  of  the  Rentier  State’,  Comparative  Politics,  Vol.  27,  No.  1,  1994,  p.  21,  who  argues  through  a  case  study  of  Saudi  and  Iraqi  reform  efforts  that  widely  different  results  will  be  experienced  in  similar  situations  due  to  local  characteristics.  52  Hilson  and  Maconachie,  ‘”Good  Governance”’,  p.  62.         26  
  29. 29.  Governance,  Transparency,  and  the  EITI     Global  energy  flows  have  historically  been  governed  by  a  patchwork  of  institutions  whose  overlapping  authority  and  jurisdiction  make  for  complicated  analysis.    Included  in  this  institutional  architecture  are  a  myriad  of  bilateral  agreements;  bodies  such  as  the  International  Energy  Agency  (IEA)  and  the  Group  of  Eight  (G8),  in  which  energy  exporters  are  grossly  underrepresented;  financial  institutions  such  as  the  World  Bank  (WB)  and  the  International  Monetary  Fund  (IMF),  which  provide  technical  and  financial  assistance  to  developing  countries;  poorly  regulated  and  heavily  distorted  markets;  and  weak  and  nonbinding  rule  systems  which  emanate  from  the  above  sources.53    Prior  to  the  emergence  of  transparency  as  an  international  norm,  this  fragmented  institutional  framework  was  largely  directed  towards  the  correction  of  market  failures,  the  lowering  of  transaction  costs,  and  the  regulation  of  market  exchange.54    Of  importance  to  those  involved  were  value-­‐free  realpolitik  concerns  about  the  security  of  energy  supply  and  price  stability.55    Such  calculations  were  especially  significant  in  the  case  of  oil  –  it  is  the  foremost  strategic  good,  the  backbone  of  modern  industrial                                                                                                                  53  It  is  beyond  the  purview  of  this  study  to  examine  these  institutions  in  full,  or  to  list  the  full  gamut  of  bodies  involved  in  global  energy  governance.    This  has  been  attempted  elsewhere  with  varying  success.  See  for  example  Ann  Florini  and  Benjamin  K.  Sovacool,  ‘Who  Governs  Energy?    The  Challenges  Facing  Global  Energy  Governance’,  Energy  Policy,  Vol.  37,  No.  12,  2009,  pp.  5239-­‐5248.  54  Andreas  Goldthau  et  al.,  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  Way  Forward’,  in  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2010,  p.  344.  55  Thorsten  Benner  and  Ricardo  Soares  de  Oliveira,  The  Good/Bad  Nexus  in  Global  Energy  Governance’,  in  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institution  Press,  2010,  p.  287.     27  
  30. 30. economies,  and  hence  critical  to  the  maintenance  and  survival  of  the  state.56    Broader  issues  arising  from  energy  extraction  affecting  the  political,  social,  or  environmental  concerns  of  exporting  countries  were  treated  on  an  ad-­‐hoc  basis,  often  by  bodies  outside  of  the  energy  governance  framework.57    ‘Good’  or  ‘bad’  governance  within  this  framework  was  therefore  to  be  judged  primarily  in  economic  terms.58     This  narrow  geo-­‐political/geo-­‐economic  focus  of  global  energy  governance  has  been  reflected  in  the  literature  on  the  subject.    As  Ann  Florini  and  Benjamin  Sovacool  point  out,  insufficient  scholarly  attention  has  been  paid  to  the  patchwork  of  institutions  that  currently  make  up  the  global  energy  governance  framework,  or  to  the  conspicuous  institutional  gaps  that  exist  between  them.    Rather,  the  global  energy  governance  literature  is  focused  upon  either  the  ‘technological  or  economic  aspects  of  systems,  markets,  and  policy  decisions’,59  or  on  energy  security  in  the  context  of  shifting  geo-­‐political  landscapes.60    According  to  Andreas  Goldthau,  this  concentration  on  essentially  zero-­‐sum  games  diverts  attention  from  the  institutional  architecture  that  underpins  global  energy  governance.61                                                                                                                  56  Dries  Lesage  et  al.  Global  Energy  Governance  in  a  Mulitpolar  World,  Burlington,  Ashgate,  2010,  p.  183.    The  significance  of  maintaining  the  security  of  oil  supply  is  unlikely  to  diminish,  with  global  needs  to  rise  by  as  much  as  50%  by  2030,  assuming  no  drastic  changes  to  national  energy  policies.    Gillies,  ‘Reputational  Concerns’,  p.  107.  57  Florini  and  Sovacool,  ‘Who  Governs  Energy?’,  p.  5239.  58  Benner  and  Oliveira,  ‘The  Good/Bad  Nexus’,  p.  287.  59  Florini  and  Sovacool,  ‘Who  Governs  Energy?’,  p.  5240.  60  Included  here  are  China’s  “scramble  for  Africa”,  access  to  the  Caspian  Sea  gas  fields,  as  well  as  the  beginnings  of  the  race  for  the  Arctic.    See  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte,  The  Role  of  Rules  and  Institutions  in  Global  Energy:  An  Introduction’,  in  Andreas  Goldthau  and  Jan  Martin  Witte  (eds.),  Global  Energy  Governance:  The  New  Rules  of  the  Game,  Washington,  Brookings  Institute  Press,  2010,  pp.  1-­‐2.  61  Ibid,  pp.  1-­‐2.     28  

×