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Guide to Defining Missions,   Objectives & MetricsT|A        © Copyright 2011 The Prinzo Group                            ...
Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics                              About TalentAcquisition.net   T|A  TalentAcquisit...
Developing Missions, Objectives and MetricsIntroductionMetrics are quantitative measurements of performance or production....
Developing Missions, Objectives and MetricsWhen developing the mission statement, it is important to ask the following que...
Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics       Are the objectives stated clearly?              ·    The objectives shou...
Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics           ·   All costs are within 5% of associated benchmarks.Metric measurem...
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Talent Acquisition: Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics

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Metrics are quantitative measurements of performance or production. An HR organization can
use metrics to track progress towards strategic objectives. By using metrics, an organization
can ensure that progress and milestones required to fulfill the mission are being met. However,
before defining and implementing a metrics program, it is important to understand how
metrics support the organization’s mission and objectives.

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Talent Acquisition: Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics

  1. 1. Guide to Defining Missions, Objectives & MetricsT|A © Copyright 2011 The Prinzo Group T|A Page 1 TalentAcquisition.net
  2. 2. Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics About TalentAcquisition.net T|A TalentAcquisition.net Talent Acquisition is the most fundamental and critical driver of organizational performance. In the simplest sense, it is putting people to work. It begins with workforce design and includes recruiting, assessment,development, workforce planning, and retention. Today, Talent Acquisition involves any combination ofemployees, contingent workers, contractors, consultants, and outsourced operations working aroundthe world.TalentAcquisition.net is dedicated to helping HR professionals optimize their performance by providingknowledge for the Talent Acquisition Lifecycle. TalentAcquisition.net is a division of The Prinzo Group, aninnovative knowledge firm that provides expertise for the enterprise. Research, publications,workshops, online/onsite training and professional services are available to individuals andorganizations involved in human resources and enterprise technology initiatives.For more information contact:The Prinzo Group2050 Marconi Drive, Suite 300Alpharetta, GA 30005Phone: 770.777.8316e-mail: support@talentacquisition.netWeb: http://talentacquisition.net | http://prinzogroup.comT|A © Copyright 2011 The Prinzo Group Page 2
  3. 3. Developing Missions, Objectives and MetricsIntroductionMetrics are quantitative measurements of performance or production. An HR organization canuse metrics to track progress towards strategic objectives. By using metrics, an organizationcan ensure that progress and milestones required to fulfill the mission are being met. However,before defining and implementing a metrics program, it is important to understand howmetrics support the organization’s mission and objectives.MissionThe organization’s mission statement establishes the purpose of an organization. While it mightappear to be obvious or inherent to the organization itself, a clearly defined mission statementis something that requires both time and effort. Since all other objectives, metrics and businessstrategies revolve around an organization’s mission, it is essential to have a practical, workingmission statement that can inspire action at all levels within the organization.A mission statement for a community hospital may be: “To be the best performing communityhospital in the county through the process of market driven continuous improvement.” Thismission statement sets a standard or goal for the organization (“to be the best performingcommunity hospital in the county”) while also defining exactly how this standard should beattained (“through the process of market driven continuous improvement.”)The organizational mission statement should act to guide all aspects of business within thatorganization. Separate departments or branches of the organization can create missionstatements specific to their function within the larger organization. Their specific missionstatement should, of course, help to encourage the accomplishment of the largerorganizational mission.A mission statement for the Human Resource Department of the same community hospitalmentioned above may be: “Maximize stakeholder value through recruitment, development andretention of human capital.” This mission statement explicitly states the goal of theirdepartment within the organization (“maximize stakeholder value”) while providing a plan forhow their goal should be accomplished (“through recruitment, development and the retentionof human capital.”) In this example, the HR Department’s mission statement works toaccomplish the specific goals it has defined while supporting the goals stated in the hospital’smission statement.T|A © Copyright 2011 The Prinzo Group Page 3
  4. 4. Developing Missions, Objectives and MetricsWhen developing the mission statement, it is important to ask the following questions:Does it make sense? · A mission statement must be explicit and easy to understand, support the mission of the organization as a whole and make sense to all employees.Will it stand the test of time? · A mission statement must retain validity over the long term. In other words, individuals should ask: will this statement still be pertinent and valid - tomorrow, next month or even, next year? The mission statement should define the organization’s function and purpose over an extended period of time. A good mission statement will encourage the organization’s growth and accommodate any small changes that are certain to occur as the organization continues to develop.Does the departmental mission statement support the organizational mission? · The organizational mission statement reigns supreme over departmental or branch mission statements. It guides the mission statements that are created by smaller units within the organization. It is each unit’s responsibility to determine their function in accomplishing the larger organizational mission.ObjectivesAfter creating the mission statement, an organization should establish its objectives. Objectivesare specific and measurable deliverables used to fulfill the mission. Sample objectives for aHuman Resource Department might be: to place quality applicants in all positions whilerecognizing the value of diversity; to place emphasis on high level performance or to placeemphasis on competitive efficiency.When developing objectives, it is important to ask the following questions: Do the objectives support every aspect of the mission? Do they leave anything out? · Objectives should define a plan to attain the organizational goals outlined in the mission statement. They should be specific and set high goals that encourage the growth and fulfillment of both individual and organizational mission statements.T|A © Copyright 2011 The Prinzo Group Page 4
  5. 5. Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics Are the objectives stated clearly? · The objectives should be easily understood by everyone and be defined in terms that motivate the execution of the mission statement. Are the objectives measurable? · To determine progress, organizations must measure the results of their performance against the objectives which they are implementing.MetricsMission statements and objectives are only worthwhile if effective measurement tools are inplace and are used to gauge performance. The HR metrics in this report provide those effectivetools. The following demonstrates how these HR metrics can be used to measure performancetowards the objectives set above. Objective: To place quality applicants in all positions while recognizing the value of diversity. Supporting Metrics: · Average new hire rating of 3.75 based on pre-recruiting requirements. · Average employee performance rating of 3.5 based on position performance standards. · Annual organization audit. · Succession and development plans established for all critical employees. · Development plans established and followed for 70% of all employees. Objective: To place emphasis on high level performance. Supporting Metrics: · 85% of new hires start on time. · Average manager service rating exceeds 3.75 based on service agreements. · Average employee service rating exceeds 3.5 based on established performance standards. · Average new hire satisfaction rating exceeds 3.75. · Average candidate satisfaction rating exceeds 3.5. Objective: To place emphasis on competitive efficiency. Supported Metrics: · Compensation for 75% of job groups is within 5% of associated benchmarks.T|A © Copyright 2011 The Prinzo Group Page 5
  6. 6. Developing Missions, Objectives and Metrics · All costs are within 5% of associated benchmarks.Metric measurements should be limited to tangible outcomes or results. Just as with bothmission statements and objectives, it is essential that everyone understand the metrics andhow they will be used. Questions to ask before implementing a metrics program include: · Do the metrics measure outcomes or results? · Does everyone involved understand the metrics? o What do they measure? o How are they calculated? o What drives the metrics? · What do the HR customers think of them?SummaryMeasurement can be very empowering and is the best way to highlight areas that needimprovement. Successful human resource professionals realize that measuring performanceallows them to establish business-partner relationships with their customers. However, beforeimplementing a performance measurement program, make sure that your measurementssupport your organization’s mission and objectives. Once the HR mission statement andobjectives have been established, you can choose how to measure performance throughmetrics.To assist in the process, the follow sections contain a comprehensive list of the HR metrics thatan organization can use to measure everything from benefits and group performance to safetyand diversity. These metrics were collected from research, interviews and survey submissions.Each metric was tested to make sure it results in logical and useful answers beneficial to HRprofessionals. Each metric listed in this report provides a description of the specific activity tobe measured, the formula used to calculate performance, a practical example of its use and thepros and cons of each measurement.T|A © Copyright 2011 The Prinzo Group Page 6

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