INDUSRTY ANALYSIS
Fundamental Analysis• Fundamental analysts look for companies  whose financial health is good and getting  better, and whi...
Fundamental Analysis continued• Fundamentalists tend to be buy and hold  investors, as opposed to technicians who tend  to...
Top Down Analysis• Traditionally, fundamental analysts perform a  “top down” analysis to determine which  stocks to buy or...
Industry Analysis• Once we have done a thorough economic  analysis, we ask the question “which  industries will benefit mo...
What is an Industry?• An industry is a group of companies which  produce similar goods and/or services.• Until recently (a...
What is an Industry? continued• breakdown of industries.• NAICS will also facilitate comparisons of  companies in the US, ...
Industry Analysis Definition• A market assessment tool designed to provide  a business with an idea of the complexity of a...
Components of Industry Analysis• The purpose of industry analysis is to identify  which industries will be good for invest...
Components of Industry Analysis         continued– Labor Conditions– Historical Financial Performance– Financial and Finan...
Competitive Structure• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – What companies are in the industry?  – What are their ...
Permanence• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – Is the industry likely to survive in the long-run?  – Are there a...
Phase of Life Cycle• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – Where is the industry in its life cycle? The best    ret...
Vulnerability to External Shocks• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – Could major portions of the industry be    ...
Regulatory and Tax Conditions• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – What are the current regulations that the indu...
Labor Conditions• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – What percentage of the industry’s workers are    unionized?...
Historical Financial Performance• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – What is the historical record of industry  ...
Financial and Financing Issues• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – How much debt does the average firm have?  – ...
Industry Stock Price Valuation• Some of the questions to be answered are:  – What is the historical average P/E for the in...
Sources of Industry Information• The primary sources of industry-wide information are trade  groups, for example:    –   S...
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Indusrty analysis

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Indusrty analysis

  1. 1. INDUSRTY ANALYSIS
  2. 2. Fundamental Analysis• Fundamental analysts look for companies whose financial health is good and getting better, and which are undervalued by the market• They scour financial reports, calculate ratios, compare to other similar companies, etc• Fundamental analysts believe that “earnings drive stock prices” at least in the long run
  3. 3. Fundamental Analysis continued• Fundamentalists tend to be buy and hold investors, as opposed to technicians who tend to be shorter-term traders
  4. 4. Top Down Analysis• Traditionally, fundamental analysts perform a “top down” analysis to determine which stocks to buy or sell.• The top down method consists of: – A macro economic analysis – An industry analysis – A company analysis
  5. 5. Industry Analysis• Once we have done a thorough economic analysis, we ask the question “which industries will benefit most from the upcoming economic environment?”• This will lead to several industries, and our analysis will lead us to choose the one that we find to be best positioned.
  6. 6. What is an Industry?• An industry is a group of companies which produce similar goods and/or services.• Until recently (and often still), industries were classified by Standardized Industrial Classification (SIC) codes, but this was replaced by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which is much more detailed than SIC.• SIC codes were 4-digit, while the NAICS uses 6 digits for a much finer, and more useful,
  7. 7. What is an Industry? continued• breakdown of industries.• NAICS will also facilitate comparisons of companies in the US, Canada, and Mexico (it was developed by all three countries for this purpose).
  8. 8. Industry Analysis Definition• A market assessment tool designed to provide a business with an idea of the complexity of a particular industry. Industry analysis involves reviewing the economic, political and market factors that influence the way the industry develops. Major factors can include the power wielded by suppliers and buyers, the condition of competitors, and the likelihood of new market entrants.
  9. 9. Components of Industry Analysis• The purpose of industry analysis is to identify which industries will be good for investors in the upcoming environment.• Your textbook has an excellent discussion of 9 issues that should be addressed: – Competitive Structure – Permanence – Phase of Life Cycle – Vulnerability to External Shocks – Regulatory and Tax Conditions
  10. 10. Components of Industry Analysis continued– Labor Conditions– Historical Financial Performance– Financial and Financing Issues– Industry Stock Price Valuation
  11. 11. Competitive Structure• Some of the questions to be answered are: – What companies are in the industry? – What are their market shares? – Which are publicly traded? – Has the number of competitors been rising, fallen, or remained stable?
  12. 12. Permanence• Some of the questions to be answered are: – Is the industry likely to survive in the long-run? – Are there any major technological threats (such as laser printer was to the dot matrix printer)? – Are there regulatory threats?
  13. 13. Phase of Life Cycle• Some of the questions to be answered are: – Where is the industry in its life cycle? The best returns and most risk tend to occur early in the cycle. – The possible phases are: • Birth Phase • Growth Phase • Mature Growth Phase • Stabilization or Decline Phase
  14. 14. Vulnerability to External Shocks• Some of the questions to be answered are: – Could major portions of the industry be nationalized by foreign governments? – Are they dependent on supplies of key commodities (such as oil)? – Are they subject to external political whims? (South Africa’s gold industry suffered when Apartheid became an international issue.) – Are they subject to fashion trends that may soon change?
  15. 15. Regulatory and Tax Conditions• Some of the questions to be answered are: – What are the current regulations that the industry faces? – Are there likely to be new regulations? – Are the industry’s products subject to special taxes (such as “sin taxes” on alcohol and tobacco products or the “windfall profits” tax on oil companies in the 1970’s)? – Are there special tax breaks offered to the industry?
  16. 16. Labor Conditions• Some of the questions to be answered are: – What percentage of the industry’s workers are unionized? – Are the unions generally hostile or complacent? – Is unionization increasing or decreasing? – Are qualified workers easily obtainable, or are they difficult to find? This has been a particular problem for the high-tech industries.
  17. 17. Historical Financial Performance• Some of the questions to be answered are: – What is the historical record of industry revenue, earnings and dividends? – Are these financial variables cyclical, counter- cyclical? – Have they been growing slowly, rapidly, or about average? – What is the average cost structure in the industry? Heavy on fixed costs? Or, are variable costs the lion’s share?
  18. 18. Financial and Financing Issues• Some of the questions to be answered are: – How much debt does the average firm have? – What is the mix between fixed assets and current assets? Is it labor intensive or capital intensive? – What is the average age of the fixed assets? Will they have to be replaced soon?
  19. 19. Industry Stock Price Valuation• Some of the questions to be answered are: – What is the historical average P/E for the industry? – How high has it been? What were the economic conditions when the highs were hit? – How low has it been? What were the economic conditions when the lows were hit? – Where is it now? Where should it be, based on historical economic comparisons? – What kinds of capital gains and dividend yields have historically been generated?
  20. 20. Sources of Industry Information• The primary sources of industry-wide information are trade groups, for example: – Semiconductor Industry Association (http://www.semichips.org/) – Wards (automobiles, http://www.wardsauto.com/) – Electronics Industry Association (http://www.eia.org/) – Software Publishers Association (http://www.spa.org/)• There are also many trade magazines that may, or may not, be published by the trade associations.• Additionally, Value Line Investment Survey (http://www.valueline.com/) publishes an analysis of each of the industries that they cover.• Finally, research analysts at brokerage firms often provide reports on the industries that they cover.
  21. 21. THANK YOU

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