Persuasive writing ii

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Persuasive writing ii

  1. 1. By Ms. M. Hudson Resurrection of Our Lord School Persuasive Writing: The 5-Paragraph Essay
  2. 2. Persuasive essays <ul><li>Are ideal for presenting opinions that require extensive support. </li></ul><ul><li>Should be considered when there are two or more supporting reasons. </li></ul><ul><li>Are often called argumentative essays. </li></ul><ul><li>In the 5-paragraph essay, there are three supporting reasons. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Where do I begin? You begin the same way you did when considering just one paragraph.
  4. 4. The Writing Process <ul><li>Let’s begin here. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Paragraph Components <ul><li>In Persuasive Writing </li></ul>
  6. 6. Prewriting <ul><li>If you cannot think of a persuasive topic, make a list of issues that interest you. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not think about the list. Simply write. Jot down key words or draw pictures to help you generate a list of issues. </li></ul><ul><li>However, if you have a topic in mind, begin a list of pros and cons. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Prewriting Sample <ul><li>Generating a list </li></ul><ul><li>Using Pros & Cons – </li></ul><ul><li>No School Uniforms </li></ul><ul><li>No School Uniforms </li></ul><ul><li>Banned Books </li></ul><ul><li>Violence in Television </li></ul><ul><li>Modified School Lunch </li></ul><ul><li>Abolish Standardized Tests </li></ul><ul><li>Pros </li></ul><ul><li>Uniforms limit expression. </li></ul><ul><li>Uniforms do not guarantee safety. </li></ul><ul><li>Cons </li></ul><ul><li>Uniforms instill discipline. </li></ul><ul><li>Uniforms are inexpensive. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Prewriting II: Research Before you move to the second stage of the writing process, research your topic. Make sure there is enough reliable information to support a strong persuasive essay. You can visit the local library , view online collections , contact experts , conduct interviews , and survey opinion . If your research does not yield sufficient infor- mation, you should return to the initial pre- writing stage to find a new topic.
  9. 9. First Draft <ul><li>Once you select a topic and identify your three supporting reasons, WRITE! </li></ul><ul><li>You should, though, begin with your body paragraphs – the paragraphs that contain your supporting reasons. Write those paragraphs first, making certain that each has all the components of effective paragraph writing. </li></ul><ul><li>You can return to your draft later to write the introductory and concluding paragraphs. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Paragraph Outline <ul><li>In Persuasive Writing </li></ul>
  11. 11. Persuasive Outline at a Glance <ul><li>Introductory Paragraph </li></ul><ul><li>1 st Supporting Reason </li></ul><ul><li>2 nd Supporting Reason </li></ul><ul><li>3 rd Supporting Reason </li></ul><ul><li>Concluding Paragraph </li></ul>
  12. 12. I. Introductory Paragraph <ul><li>Captures the reader’s attention – with a short story, an </li></ul><ul><li>interesting fact or statistic. </li></ul><ul><li>B. Introduces the main idea of the essay </li></ul><ul><li>(the position statement). </li></ul><ul><li>A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one. </li></ul>
  13. 13. II. 1 st Supporting Reason (Body) <ul><li>Includes your first supporting reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses evidence – expert opinion, statistic, fact, example, </li></ul><ul><li>quotation – to support your first reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Other sentences that give details to support the reason. </li></ul><ul><li>A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one. </li></ul>
  14. 14. III. 2 nd Supporting Reason (Body) <ul><li>Includes your second supporting reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses evidence – expert opinion, statistic, fact, example, </li></ul><ul><li>quotation – to support your first reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Other sentences that give details to support the reason. </li></ul><ul><li>A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one. </li></ul>
  15. 15. IV. 3 rd Supporting Reason (Body) <ul><li>Includes your third supporting reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses evidence – expert opinion, statistic, fact, example, </li></ul><ul><li>quotation – to support your first reason. </li></ul><ul><li>Other sentences that give details to support the reason. </li></ul><ul><li>A transitional sentence that guides the reader from this paragraph to the next one. </li></ul>
  16. 16. V. Concluding Paragraph <ul><li>Restates the main idea (position statement). </li></ul><ul><li>Leave the reader with an IMPRESSION – something that persuades; it may be a reminder of fact or a statement. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Revision <ul><li>In the third stage of the writing process, review draft for content. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you have three supporting reasons? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the reasons strong and justified with valid and varied evidence? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the evidence used related to the reason? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the words selected carefully and purposefully? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the sentence length varied? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the writing possess transitional words and sentences? </li></ul>
  18. 18. Transitional Words & Phrases <ul><li>after </li></ul><ul><li>before </li></ul><ul><li>because </li></ul><ul><li>although </li></ul><ul><li>now </li></ul><ul><li>therefore </li></ul><ul><li>however </li></ul><ul><li>though </li></ul><ul><li>above all </li></ul><ul><li>according to </li></ul><ul><li>for example </li></ul><ul><li>for instance </li></ul><ul><li>then </li></ul><ul><li>furthermore </li></ul><ul><li>first, second, third </li></ul><ul><li>additionally </li></ul><ul><li>next </li></ul><ul><li>consequently </li></ul><ul><li>subsequently </li></ul><ul><li>as a result </li></ul><ul><li>as a matter of fact </li></ul><ul><li>all in all </li></ul><ul><li>in conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>since </li></ul>
  19. 19. Proofreading <ul><li>In the fourth stage of the writing process, edit writing for basic grammar. </li></ul><ul><li>Is the first line of every paragraph indented? </li></ul><ul><li>Does every sentence begin with a capital letter? </li></ul><ul><li>Does each sentence end with a punctuation mark appropriate for the type of sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Are other punctuation marks used correctly – commas, colons, semi-colons, dashes, apostrophes, etc.? </li></ul><ul><li>Do subjects agree with their verbs? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there a consistent verb tense throughout the writing? </li></ul>
  20. 20. Write Time! <ul><li>At this point in the lesson, you should have selected a topic or an issue and conducted research to determine its validity. </li></ul>Now, it is time to begin the first draft.

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