Social Technology and Education Collaboration, Authorship, Authority, and the Changing Structures of Information
Context: The Technology Paradigm <ul><li>Our younger students have not known a world without computers. Many can’t remembe...
Context: The Technology Paradigm <ul><li>The internet increasingly functions as a primary source of news and information. ...
Context: The Technology Paradigm Information Consumers Madden, Mary and Susannah Fox (October 2006).  Riding the Waves of ...
Context: The Technology Paradigm <ul><li>For our traditional first-year students, the internet is a primary forum for thei...
Web 2.0 and “Social” Technologies <ul><li>2004 marks the beginning of “Web 2.0.” Experts don’t know what Web 2.0 means—the...
Web 2.0 and “Social” Technologies <ul><li>“Social” technologies are part of Web 2.0, as they emphasize: </li></ul><ul><li>...
Web 2.0 and “Social” Technologies <ul><li>Knowledge Dissemination </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>P...
Knowledge Dissemination  <ul><li>Like journals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regularly updated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Often pe...
Knowledge Dissemination  <ul><li>Some Examples </li></ul><ul><li>The Daily Kos ( Markos   Moulitsas   Zúniga ) </li></ul><...
Wikis <ul><li>“ Open source” information </li></ul><ul><li>Global  collective </li></ul><ul><li>Globally  collaborative </...
Wikis: More . . . <ul><li>Wikipedia Accuracy: A  Nature  study:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Errors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><...
iPod   broadcasts :  Podcasts <ul><li>Connection to iPods in name only (Xerox) </li></ul><ul><li>Recorded audio (and somet...
Podcasts: More . . . <ul><li>UCLA, Stanford, MIT, Purdue and other Universities are offering faculty lectures, for free, t...
Themes <ul><li>Who has  auth ority : who is a content creator? </li></ul><ul><li>How are authors and publishers  accountab...
Importance to Educators <ul><li>Are our students reflected in this information on technology? </li></ul><ul><li>How import...
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Social Tech And Teaching August In Service

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This is a slideshow that was used at GateWay Community College's Fall 2007 Faculty In-Service in order to provide faculty with an overview of social technology in relation to education.

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Social Tech And Teaching August In Service

  1. 1. Social Technology and Education Collaboration, Authorship, Authority, and the Changing Structures of Information
  2. 2. Context: The Technology Paradigm <ul><li>Our younger students have not known a world without computers. Many can’t remember a world without the internet. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>When Time Magazine named The Computer as the ‘Man of the Year’ in 1982.* </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The internet was unveiled in 1991.** </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>* Friedrich, Otto. (1983, Jan). 1982: The Computer . Time Magazine Online . Retrieved August 13, 2007, from http://www.time.com/time/subscriber/personoftheyear/archive/stories/1982.html </li></ul><ul><li>**Zakon, Robert H’Obbes’ (2006). Hobbes' Internet Timeline v8.2. Retrieved August 13, 2007 from http://www.zakon.org/robert/internet/timeline/ </li></ul>The Ubiquitous Internet
  3. 3. Context: The Technology Paradigm <ul><li>The internet increasingly functions as a primary source of news and information. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>76% of teens who used the internet found their news online.* </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In 2004, 27% of internet users reported reading blogs. By 2006, that number had climbed to 39%.** </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>On “an average day” in August of 2006, 44% of all adult internet users checked the news online.*** </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In 2004, 61% of internet users used the internet as a means for political activity: “to get political news and information, discuss candidates . . .debate issues in emails, or participate . . . by volunteering or giving contributions to candidates.”**** </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>* Lenhart, A., Madden, M. & Hitlin, P. (2005, July). Teens and technology: Youth are leading the transition to a fully wired and mobile nation .. Retrieved Nov. 30, 2005, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Teens_Tech_July2005web.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>**Lenhart, A. and Fox, S. (2006, July). Bloggers: A Portrait of the Internet’s New Storytellers . Retrieved Aug 13, 2007, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site: http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP%20Bloggers%20Report%20July%2019%202006.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>***Horrigan, J. (2006, March). Online News . Retrieved Aug. 13, 2007, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site: http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_News.and.Broadband.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>**** Raine, L, Cornfield, M, and Horrigan, J. (2005, March). The Internet and Campaign 2004 Retrieved Aug. 13, 2007, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site: http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/198/report_display.asp </li></ul>Information Consumers
  4. 4. Context: The Technology Paradigm Information Consumers Madden, Mary and Susannah Fox (October 2006). Riding the Waves of “Web 2.0”. Retrieved Aug. 13, 2007, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site: http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Web_2.0.pdf
  5. 5. Context: The Technology Paradigm <ul><li>For our traditional first-year students, the internet is a primary forum for their social, intellectual, creative, and leisure activity. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In 2005, 87% of US teens use the internet.* </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>81% of teen internet users play games online* </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>55% of online teens use social networking websites*** </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>57% of teenage internet users are also Content Creators** </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>* Lenhart, A., Madden, M. & Hitlin, P. (2005, July). Teens and technology: Youth are leading the transition to a fully wired and mobile nation .. Retrieved Nov. 30, 2005, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Teens_Tech_July2005web.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>**Lenhart, A. and Madden, M. (2005, November). Teen content creators and consumers . Retrieved Nov. 30, 2005, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site: http:// www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Teens_Content_Creation.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>***Lenhart, A. and Madden, M. (2007, January). Social Networking Websites and Teens: An Overview . Retrieved Aug. 6, 2007, from the Pew Internet and American Life Project Web site: http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/198/report_display.asp </li></ul>Content Creators
  6. 6. Web 2.0 and “Social” Technologies <ul><li>2004 marks the beginning of “Web 2.0.” Experts don’t know what Web 2.0 means—they really only have a sense. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually, Web 2.0 has the following qualities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Web “sites” look more like web “applications” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read / Write Web (open source) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Deep linking” – all information is interconnected </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The “semantic” web (computers and people speak the same language) </li></ul></ul>Impossible Definitions
  7. 7. Web 2.0 and “Social” Technologies <ul><li>“Social” technologies are part of Web 2.0, as they emphasize: </li></ul><ul><li>Public Access </li></ul><ul><li>Interactivity </li></ul><ul><li>A “Bottom-Up” (as opposed to “Top-Down”) approach to information </li></ul><ul><li>A community focus </li></ul>What Makes it Social?
  8. 8. Web 2.0 and “Social” Technologies <ul><li>Knowledge Dissemination </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social Networking </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facebook / MySpace </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plazes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Collaboration Technologies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wikipedia.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bubble.us </li></ul></ul>Some False Taxonomies
  9. 9. Knowledge Dissemination <ul><li>Like journals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regularly updated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Often personal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Similar to the journal genre </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Unlike journals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overtly dialogic (influence) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overtly dialectic (debate) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source-driven </li></ul></ul>[we]B-Logs: Blogs
  10. 10. Knowledge Dissemination <ul><li>Some Examples </li></ul><ul><li>The Daily Kos ( Markos Moulitsas Zúniga ) </li></ul><ul><li>The Drudge Report (Matt Drudge) </li></ul><ul><li>Photo Blog: Flickr (Gregory Alkaitis Carafelli ) </li></ul><ul><li>GateWay Student’s Blog (Jason ?) </li></ul><ul><li>My ENG102 course blog </li></ul><ul><li>Searching Blogs: </li></ul><ul><li>Technorati (subject search): www.technorati.com </li></ul><ul><li>Blogger Blog Search: http:// search.blogger.com / </li></ul><ul><li>Some Facts: </li></ul><ul><li>9% of internet users reported reading political blogs during the ‘04 elections </li></ul><ul><li>Bloggers were invited onto all major news stations </li></ul>[we]B-Logs: Blogs (More)
  11. 11. Wikis <ul><li>“ Open source” information </li></ul><ul><li>Global collective </li></ul><ul><li>Globally collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>http://wikipedia.org is the most (in)famous </li></ul><ul><li>Google’s define: x function gives us: </li></ul><ul><li>A website or similar online resource which allows users to add and edit content collectively. www.parliament.vic.gov.au/sarc/E-Democracy/Final_Report/Glossary.htm </li></ul>
  12. 12. Wikis: More . . . <ul><li>Wikipedia Accuracy: A Nature study: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Errors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wikipedia: 4 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Encyclopedia Britannica: 4 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vague/Misleading Statements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wikipedia: 162 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Encyclopedia Britannica: 123 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Emigh and Herring find consensus more often than dissensus in Wikipedia entries </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki Pages often get locked down if there is too much editing or vandalism </li></ul><ul><li>Wiki pages can be tagged for bias </li></ul>
  13. 13. iPod broadcasts : Podcasts <ul><li>Connection to iPods in name only (Xerox) </li></ul><ul><li>Recorded audio (and sometimes video) content that is downloadable </li></ul><ul><li>Attached to RSS feeds </li></ul><ul><li>Creation requires only a computer and microphone </li></ul>
  14. 14. Podcasts: More . . . <ul><li>UCLA, Stanford, MIT, Purdue and other Universities are offering faculty lectures, for free, through podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>12% of internet users have downloaded a podcast at some time </li></ul><ul><li>iTunes and the iPod—portability </li></ul>
  15. 15. Themes <ul><li>Who has auth ority : who is a content creator? </li></ul><ul><li>How are authors and publishers accountable ? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the benefits and pitfalls of anonymity (a revisable self)? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we handle the instability of information – its increasingly transitory nature? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the web the ultimate collaboration ? </li></ul><ul><li>What challenges face ‘ intellectual property ’ </li></ul><ul><li>What happens to meat-space borders and boundaries : what happens to notions of local and global ? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the new literate practices (BRB, LOL) simply new or are they also in some way diminished? </li></ul><ul><li>Is this an economically “ flat world ” (Friedman)? </li></ul>
  16. 16. Importance to Educators <ul><li>Are our students reflected in this information on technology? </li></ul><ul><li>How important is technology literacy to GateWay students? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I advise my students concerning credible sources for their research? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I handle my students’ use of online acronyms in their class work? </li></ul><ul><li>How can I know if my students’ work is authentic and original? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the easiest ways to supplement my course materials with technologies? </li></ul><ul><li>Others? </li></ul>

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