Developing Teen Leaders Using 3D Games

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Presentation at Virtual School Symposium, November 2010

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  • Over the last decade the idea that video games can function as effective learning tools has taken hold within dialogues about education and digital media. While early work pointed to the potential these tools hold for informing educational practices, the last two years have seen significant advances in understanding the learning that takes place in games. Several researchers are examining the ability of games to support and promote leadership development. In the summer of 2010, we decided to offer a teen summer camp experience that would further explore teen leadership through a living game experience.
  • Needs: Teen leadership & community support for gamers
    Design: a living meta-game
    Data collection:
    Software
    Observations
    Focus group
  • Felt the camp validated their talents and interests.
    Students wanted parents and school leaders…
    involved in their social gaming,
    to meet parents of other gamers,
    To support the kids’ ability to game.
    The also expressed the desire …
    create a persistent community after the end of the camp “it was nice to know there are other people who are like me”
    for quests to continue after the camp.
    for continued achievement through gaming after the camp.
    for their teachers to know what they had done.
    Student applied to a new school (high tech high) to achieve her new goals, was reported as more outgoing.
  • Over the last decade the idea that video games can function as effective learning tools has taken hold within dialogues about education and digital media. While early work pointed to the potential these tools hold for informing educational practices, the last two years have seen significant advances in understanding the learning that takes place in games. Several researchers are examining the ability of games to support and promote leadership development. In the summer of 2010, we decided to offer a teen summer camp experience that would further explore teen leadership through a living game experience.
  • Developing Teen Leaders Using 3D Games

    1. 1. Developing Teen Leaders with 3D Games Lisa Dawley, Ph.D. Chris Haskell Dept. of Educational Technology Boise State University
    2. 2. 3D GameLab  Summer 2010 teen camp  Goal: teen leadership via meta- gaming and multimedia production  17 teens, ages 13-17  2 teen teaching assistants  2 instructors, 2 teacher-player participants  Wiki with blog  Mobile mac lab and game stations
    3. 3. Guildies
    4. 4. Design-based research  Plan, implement, and evaluate based on anticipated student needs  Generate back to theory  Iterative cycles, non-linear  Theory: games and media production can be used to develop teen leadership
    5. 5. Phase 1: Pre-planning Bateman’s DGD1 player types Architect, storyteller, socializer, player, leader Weekly themes: 1. Games & play 2. Games & learning 3. Games & leadership 40 quests, from simple to complex, player choice Room and equipment set-up
    6. 6. Phase 2: Games & Play  Establishing self: Create a Mii  Learning to self-select roles and quests  Guildies like to help in-class and in-game  Social groups formed around specific games  Interested in specific characters within those games
    7. 7. Phase 3: Games & Learning The business of educational games Analysis & Reflection  Focus group: what do we learn by playing games?  Design: what elements make a game fun?  How do we improve our performance with real-time data?  Why are many educational games boring?  How can we share our learning with others through media production?
    8. 8. Phase 4: Exploring Leadership  Leadership 1st: small group discussions of digital citizenship  Peer game evaluation  Tournaments as a meta- game strategy to bring participants together across self-selected game environments Leadership 1st
    9. 9. Tournaments & Active Gaming
    10. 10. Findings: Questing  Quests  158 completed  52 unfinished or abandoned  Preference for social component.  Some chose specific games, others quests.  Some chose isolated gaming.  Consoles and computers, equal use  All 4 Bateman play-styles observed.
    11. 11. Findings: Leadership  coaching others  leading tournaments  selecting and completing quests  arriving early and staying late  contributing games/controllers/etc  creating games for others to play  collaborative scavenger hunt  alternative roles for quest achievement  contributed to quest design
    12. 12. Findings: Impact  Camp validated talents and interests  Students wanted parents and school leaders…  involved in their social gaming  to meet parents of other gamers  to support the kids’ ability to game  They also expressed the desire …  to create a persistent community  for quests to continue  for their teachers to know what they had done  A student applied to a high tech HS, reported as more outgoing “It was nice to know there are other people who are like me.”
    13. 13. Developing Teen Leaders with 3D Games Lisa Dawley, Ph.D. Chris Haskell Dept. of Educational Technology Boise State University

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