TIM Educational Model                                                                   “The moment                       ...
TIM Educational ModelNovember 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers   International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffal...
Design and Deliver Learning Infused with Creativity:        • Discrete element of learning (lesson, activity).        • Fr...
Historical Foundations: E. Paul        Torrance’s Incubation Model                                             Torrance’s ...
Integrating Creativity in a Deliberate Way:Selecting a Research Based Framework                                           ...
Torrance Incubation Model of Creative                      .       Teaching & Learning              Finding The Problem… P...
Integrating Creativity:    Main Content & Creativity in ConcertNovember 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers   International ...
Describe what is happening in                  the delivery of the lesson for                  this first part. This will ...
Lesson: Designing Key Symbols for a Post Revolution Independence Flag for a    Fictitious Country for high school Global S...
MAIN CONTENTContent Topic: Use of Symbolism in Countries Flags as Key Elements of an Identity of a Country .Content Object...
Design this stage to addressboth the content & creativitygoal.                            In addition to setting the purpo...
Content Objective:To describe the symbolism as it relates tothe creation of flags for countriesCreativity Goal:To articula...
One or more strategies are used to deepen the expectations. These include: go         beyond the obvious, look deeply, kee...
Content Objective:To describe the symbolism as itrelates to the creation of flags forcountriesCreativity Goal:To articulat...
Design this stage toaddress both the content& creativity goal.                                                One or more ...
Content Objective:      To describe the      symbolism as it relates      to the creation of flags      for countries     ...
Content Objective:                                             To describe the symbolism as it relates to the creation of ...
November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers   International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
Design and Deliver Learning Infused with Creativity:• Discrete element of learning (lesson, activity).• Framework for desi...
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Tim education model

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Mooc presentation ppt, notes include full lesson on flags described

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  • Background and Research On the Torrance Incubation ModelAccording to a Torrance, the concept for the incubation model goes back as far as his work in mental health in 1949 when he wanted to motivate teachers in his classes at Kansas state. He noted that "For a long time I had been bothered that courses in psychology and education had such little impact upon what happened in classrooms. I knew that something had to be done to arouse and motivate teachers and keep them thinking about their insights" (Torrance and Safter, 1990 p. v). But was not until 1966, when he served as creativity consultant for the Ginn Reading 360 Program, that the model began to take shape. It first appeared in the journal literature as an instructional model in 1979 in the now-classic incubation issue of the Journal of Creative Behavior. Several early studies documented the engagement and on-going motivation of students with the Ginn material (Clymer, T. et. al, 1969; 1976; Plooster, 1972), and interest continues in classroom applications from elementary to higher education (Weiner, 1985) and even in training designs (Garas, in preparation). Torrance noted in 1990 that the model was challenging and "deceptively simple," and our own experience with it over the years in bears this out in practice. We have used the model in higher education for over 15 years to design and deliver classes and training for adults. In one particular class we have consistently taught it to adult students (not all of whom were teachers) and required them to use it to design and deliver creativity content to others. Feedback and formal evaluations for the course consistently support both the model's efficacy and the students' depth of learning from it. But using the TIM, as Torrance noted early on, requires training and a level of understanding about basic creativity skills. (See inserts in this issue on the difference between teaching creativity and teaching creatively and on the skill base).Teaching for Creativity: Where There's a Will, There's a WayBy Mary Murdock and Susan Keller-MathersFrom: National Association of Gifted Children’s Creativity Division Newsletter Celebrate Creativity, Vol. XIII, #2, Fall 2002
  • • Title of Lesson: Designing Key Symbols for a Post Revolution Independence Flag for a Fictitious CountryDesigned for: High School Global Studies• Materials/Information needed: Map of the world, flags of the world, interactive programs/apps on diverse countries, descriptions of symbolism, information to assist with future thinking (i.e. quotes about inventions that were thought impossible, information on future trends)• Main Topic: Use of Symbolism in Countries Flags as Key Elements of an Identity of a Country • Main Topic Goal: To describe the symbolism as it relates to the essence of a flag’s representation of a country. • Main Creativity Topic: Get Glimpses of the Future• Creativity Topic Goal: To articulate aspects of an imaginary country, including elements of future possibilities such as things that are current impossibilities and nonexistent elements. • Heightening Anticipation:• Put on display (Prior to the lesson) some unusual items from diverse countries throughout the classroom without saying anything. Have the flags of the world available throughout the room. Tell the students they will be asked in the future to imagine a new country and design a flag for that country. For now, tell them, the only thing I want you to do is to be thinking about what a new country might look like that currently does not exist. • To start the lesson formally, movie clips and visuals of several different revolutions, including the French, American and several Latin American revolutions are shown. Students discuss causes of and key features of revolutions they have studied.• Flags of the world with a description of each symbol are described.• Students are asked to imagine their own made up country (that will include elements such as technology that do not even exist right now) and consider the question, “What types of symbols might be important to your country ? (note that at this point they are asked to ponder this for a moment, not answer the question as it is designed to continue to heighten their curiosity and provide a way for their sense of imagination, through the use of fantasy to be used while setting the purpose and motivation)• Deepening Expectations: • In groups, students create, using their imaginations, a flag that represents a country that has recently gained independence through a revolution. This country is set in the future so the constraints of today don’t necessarily apply in all areas of the new country. They imagine the unimaginable, a non-existent country with a new government, geography, culture, etc and describe the essence, the heart of what is important to that country. This provides the basis for the creation of symbols that ultimately become the flag. Specific guidelines are given for key elements they need to consider, criteria for symbol creation and facilitation of teams and frameworks for teamwork implemented throughout this process. This can be done in a short timeframe if specifics to outline are given as framework since the goal of the lesson is to be able to create symbolism. This could also be a more long term lesson that occurs over several sessions if the goal is to thoroughly articulate the elements of a new country in addition to the goal of symbolism (Note that in Deepening Expectations, students are “getting into deep water”, as there are times they are unsure of what to do with all the choices they have created together and how to work effectively as a team. Appropriate guidance for both content selection and process are provided throughout. The use of “glimpse of the future” is encouraged to provide the foundation of their thinking and then critical thinking and evaluative skills are more heavily involved during the final aspect of this activity. This provides the “dynamic balance” to allow for future think and analysis to articulate key symbols).• Extending the Learning:To extend the learning, the students will present their flags to the whole class. The structure for the presentation includes an opportunity for the class to step into the presenter’s world, and become part of this future world. Therefore, a rich description of the elements of the fictitious world begins the presentation. This is followed by the presentation of the flags. The extension concludes by encouraging students to “sing in one’s own key” and to affirmatively judge the flags symbols through their own personal connections they make to the values, beliefs and key elements that are most in alignment with what flag they might consider living under. • Adapted from a lesson by Erin Holt for Creative Studies Foundations of Creative Learning Master of Science Class International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State. 
  • • Heightening Anticipation:• Put on display (Prior to the lesson) some unusual items from diverse countries throughout the classroom without saying anything. Have the flags of the world available throughout the room. Tell the students they will be asked in the future to imagine a new country and design a flag for that country. For now, tell them, the only thing I want you to do is to be thinking about what a new country might look like that currently does not exist. • To start the lesson formally, movie clips and visuals of several different revolutions, including the French, American and several Latin American revolutions are shown. Students discuss causes of and key features of revolutions they have studied.• Flags of the world with a description of each symbol are described.• Students are asked to imagine their own made up country (that will include elements such as technology that do not even exist right now) and consider the question, “What types of symbols might be important to your country ? (note that at this point they are asked to ponder this for a moment, not answer the question as it is designed to continue to heighten their curiosity and provide a way for their sense of imagination, through the use of fantasy to be used while setting the purpose and motivation)
  •  • Deepening Expectations: • In groups, students create, using their imaginations, a flag that represents a country that has recently gained independence through a revolution. This country is set in the future so the constraints of today don’t necessarily apply in all areas of the new country. They imagine the unimaginable, a non-existent country with a new government, geography, culture, etc and describe the essence, the heart of what is important to that country. This provides the basis for the creation of symbols that ultimately become the flag. Specific guidelines are given for key elements they need to consider, criteria for symbol creation and facilitation of teams and frameworks for teamwork implemented throughout this process. This can be done in a short timeframe if specifics to outline are given as framework since the goal of the lesson is to be able to create symbolism. This could also be a more long term lesson that occurs over several sessions if the goal is to thoroughly articulate the elements of a new country in addition to the goal of symbolism (Note that in Deepening Expectations, students are “getting into deep water”, as there are times they are unsure of what to do with all the choices they have created together and how to work effectively as a team. Appropriate guidance for both content selection and process are provided throughout. The use of “glimpse of the future” is encouraged to provide the foundation of their thinking and then critical thinking and evaluative skills are more heavily involved during the final aspect of this activity. This provides the “dynamic balance” to allow for future think and analysis to articulate key symbols).
  • • Extending the Learning:To extend the learning, the students will present their flags to the whole class. The structure for the presentation includes an opportunity for the class to step into the presenter’s world, and become part of this future world. Therefore, a rich description of the elements of the fictitious world begins the presentation. This is followed by the presentation of the flags. The extension concludes by encouraging students to “sing in one’s own key” and to affirmatively judge the flags symbols through their own personal connections they make to the values, beliefs and key elements that are most in alignment with what flag they might consider living under.
  • • Title of Lesson: Designing Key Symbols for a Post Revolution Independence Flag for a Fictitious CountryDesigned for: High School Global Studies• Materials/Information needed: Map of the world, flags of the world, interactive programs/apps on diverse countries, descriptions of symbolism, information to assist with future thinking (i.e. quotes about inventions that were thought impossible, information on future trends)• Main Topic: Use of Symbolism in Countries Flags as Key Elements of an Identity of a Country • Main Topic Goal: To describe the symbolism as it relates to the essence of a flag’s representation of a country. • Main Creativity Topic: Get Glimpses of the Future• Creativity Topic Goal: To articulate aspects of an imaginary country, including elements of future possibilities such as things that are current impossibilities and nonexistent elements. • Heightening Anticipation:• Put on display (Prior to the lesson) some unusual items from diverse countries throughout the classroom without saying anything. Have the flags of the world available throughout the room. Tell the students they will be asked in the future to imagine a new country and design a flag for that country. For now, tell them, the only thing I want you to do is to be thinking about what a new country might look like that currently does not exist. • To start the lesson formally, movie clips and visuals of several different revolutions, including the French, American and several Latin American revolutions are shown. Students discuss causes of and key features of revolutions they have studied.• Flags of the world with a description of each symbol are described.• Students are asked to imagine their own made up country (that will include elements such as technology that do not even exist right now) and consider the question, “What types of symbols might be important to your country ? (note that at this point they are asked to ponder this for a moment, not answer the question as it is designed to continue to heighten their curiosity and provide a way for their sense of imagination, through the use of fantasy to be used while setting the purpose and motivation)• Deepening Expectations: • In groups, students create, using their imaginations, a flag that represents a country that has recently gained independence through a revolution. This country is set in the future so the constraints of today don’t necessarily apply in all areas of the new country. They imagine the unimaginable, a non-existent country with a new government, geography, culture, etc and describe the essence, the heart of what is important to that country. This provides the basis for the creation of symbols that ultimately become the flag. Specific guidelines are given for key elements they need to consider, criteria for symbol creation and facilitation of teams and frameworks for teamwork implemented throughout this process. This can be done in a short timeframe if specifics to outline are given as framework since the goal of the lesson is to be able to create symbolism. This could also be a more long term lesson that occurs over several sessions if the goal is to thoroughly articulate the elements of a new country in addition to the goal of symbolism (Note that in Deepening Expectations, students are “getting into deep water”, as there are times they are unsure of what to do with all the choices they have created together and how to work effectively as a team. Appropriate guidance for both content selection and process are provided throughout. The use of “glimpse of the future” is encouraged to provide the foundation of their thinking and then critical thinking and evaluative skills are more heavily involved during the final aspect of this activity. This provides the “dynamic balance” to allow for future think and analysis to articulate key symbols).• Extending the Learning:To extend the learning, the students will present their flags to the whole class. The structure for the presentation includes an opportunity for the class to step into the presenter’s world, and become part of this future world. Therefore, a rich description of the elements of the fictitious world begins the presentation. This is followed by the presentation of the flags. The extension concludes by encouraging students to “sing in one’s own key” and to affirmatively judge the flags symbols through their own personal connections they make to the values, beliefs and key elements that are most in alignment with what flag they might consider living under. • Adapted from a lesson by Erin Holt for Creative Studies Foundations of Creative Learning Master of Science Class International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State.
  • Tim education model

    1. 1. TIM Educational Model “The moment of insight and inspiration may be sudden and brief, but it comes usually only after prolonged searching.” Mackinnon, 1978, In search of human effectiveness p.189Dr. Susan Keller-MathersInternational Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    2. 2. TIM Educational ModelNovember 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    3. 3. Design and Deliver Learning Infused with Creativity: • Discrete element of learning (lesson, activity). • Framework for designing larger learning sequence (unit, course) • Framework for series of learning opportunities and/or overall program development Meta-cognitive Processing & Diagnosing Creative Learning Needs: • As a framework to examine where you are in the creative process • As a framework and common language to examine where learners are in the creative process.November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    4. 4. Historical Foundations: E. Paul Torrance’s Incubation Model Torrance’s Original Incubation ModelNovember 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers University of Georgia Photo: http://www.uga.edu/gm/301/FeatCreate.htmlInternational Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    5. 5. Integrating Creativity in a Deliberate Way:Selecting a Research Based Framework Classic Creativity Skill Base The Problem Produce and Consider Many Be Flexible Alternatives Be Original Highlight the Essence Elaborate-But Not Excessively Keep Open Be Aware of Emotions Put Your Ideas in Context Combine and Visualize It-Richly and Enjoy and Use Fantasy Synthesize Colorfully Make It Swing Make It Look at It Another Way Visualize the Inside Ring Breakthrough-Expand Let Humor Flow and Use It Get Glimpses of the Future the Boundaries From:Torrance, E. P. &Safter, H. T. (1998). Making the creative leap beyond. Buffalo, New York: Creative Education Foundation Press.Other examples include: 4 P’s Framework for Creativity (Rhodes). Creative ProblemSolving Thinking Skills (Puccio, Mance, Murdock), Cognitive and Affective Skills(Williams).November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    6. 6. Torrance Incubation Model of Creative . Teaching & Learning Finding The Problem… Produce Heightening and Consider Many Anticipation Alternatives… Be Flexible… Be Original…Highlight the Essence… Elaborate, But Not Excessively… Keep Open… Be Deepening Aware Of Emotions… Put Ideas Expectations Into Context… Combine And Synthesize… Visualize Richly And Colorfully… Enjoy And Use Fantasy… Make It Swing, Make It Ring… Look At It Another Way… Visualize The Inside… Extending the Breakthrough: Extend The Learning Boundaries… Let The Humor Flow and Use It… Get Glimpses Of the Future.November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    7. 7. Integrating Creativity: Main Content & Creativity in ConcertNovember 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    8. 8. Describe what is happening in the delivery of the lesson for this first part. This will happen first, this will happen next, etc. Be sure you have explicitly described how you are Describe what is happening in warming up the learner to the the delivery of the lesson for content AND creativity. this second part. This will happen first, this will happen Describe what is happening in the next, etc. Be sure you have delivery of the lesson for this ending explicitly described how you part. This will happen first, this will are warming up the learner to happen next, etc. Be sure you have the content AND to the explicitly described how you are creativity assisting the learner out the back end ofNovember 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State the lesson and beyond in both content AND creativity.
    9. 9. Lesson: Designing Key Symbols for a Post Revolution Independence Flag for a Fictitious Country for high school Global Studies Adapted from a CRS 560 Lesson by Erin Holt MAIN CONTENT Main Content Topic: Use of Symbolism in Countries Flags as Key Elements of an Identity of a Country Main Topic Goal: To describe the symbolism as it relates to the essence of a flag’s representation of a country.November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    10. 10. MAIN CONTENTContent Topic: Use of Symbolism in Countries Flags as Key Elements of an Identity of a Country .Content Objective:To describe the symbolism as it relates to the creation of flags for countriesCREATIVITYCreativity Topic: Get Glimpses of the FutureCreativity Goal: To articulate aspects of an imaginarycountry, including elements of future possibilities (ie.impossible, nonexistent today).November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    11. 11. Design this stage to addressboth the content & creativitygoal. In addition to setting the purpose and motivation, design this stage to heighten anticipation through arousing curiosity, tickling the imagination, getting attention, and/or creating the desire to know November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    12. 12. Content Objective:To describe the symbolism as it relates tothe creation of flags for countriesCreativity Goal:To articulate aspects of an imaginarycountry, including elements of futurepossibilities (ie. impossible, nonexistenttoday). • Display items from diverse countries, discuss past revolutions and flag symbols. • Imagine a new country in a future world and the symbols to represent it.November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    13. 13. One or more strategies are used to deepen the expectations. These include: go beyond the obvious, look deeply, keep open to new insights be re-examining, use multiple senses, intuition, feelings, guessing, focus on the essence, find short cuts by getting rid of extraneous, get temporarily lost in complexity and take risks, push past blocks and beyond what seems impossible.November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    14. 14. Content Objective:To describe the symbolism as itrelates to the creation of flags forcountriesCreativity Goal:To articulate aspects of an imaginarycountry, including elements of futurepossibilities (i.e. impossible,nonexistent today). Students create their country’s flag. This includes symbols representing aspects that are future focused (currently nonexistent and/or impossible). November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    15. 15. Design this stage toaddress both the content& creativity goal. One or more strategies are used to deepen the expectations. These include: humor, fun, connections beyond the lesson, additional uses, personal meaning, fantasize, dream of idea, find sources of inspiration, dream of ideal, built resources, relate information to future directions, enlarge, enrich the future and articulate future solutions.November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    16. 16. Content Objective: To describe the symbolism as it relates to the creation of flags for countries Creativity Goal: To articulate aspects of an imaginary country, including Present flags. Discuss personal meaning elements of future of the symbolism and the flags. possibilities (i.e. impossible, nonexistent today).November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    17. 17. Content Objective: To describe the symbolism as it relates to the creation of flags for countries Creativity Goal: To articulate aspects of an imaginary country, including elements of future possibilities (i.e. impossible, nonexistent today). Display items from diverse countries, Students create Present flags. discuss past their country’s flag. Discuss revolutions and This includes personal flag symbols. symbols meaning Imagine a new representing of the country in a future aspects that are symbolism world and the future focused and the flags. symbols to (currently represent it. nonexistent and/or impossible).November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    18. 18. November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State
    19. 19. Design and Deliver Learning Infused with Creativity:• Discrete element of learning (lesson, activity).• Framework for designing larger learning sequence (unit, course)• Framework for series of learning opportunities and/or overall program developmentMeta-cognitive Processing & Diagnosing Creative Learning Needs:• As a framework to examine where you are in the creative process• As a framework and common language to examine where learners are in the creativeprocess. November 21, 2011 Dr. Susan Keller-Mathers International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State

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