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Bridging Stories-- Building Understanding

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This Deep Dive Session was held during the 2016 Healthy Minds | Healthy Campuses Summit in Vancouver, BC. Drawing on the tradition of practical philosophy, critical theory and hermeneutics, the workshop focused on practical dialogic tools and illustrate the intersection of theory and practice. In our multi-cultural campus communities and in light of the clash of ideas about alcohol and other drugs there is a real need to be able to hear each other in order to get beyond stereotypes and be able to develop broad understanding that celebrates diversity within our complex communities.

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Bridging Stories-- Building Understanding

  1. 1. DIALOGUE BRIDGING STORIES—BUILDING UNDERSTANDING
  2. 2. Tendency to go to what we believe is right and marshal arguments to support it Federal Court Judge Michael Phelan, in his recent ruling on access to medical cannabis, criticized expert witnesses on both sides for their “almost religious fervour” and for not being open to consider evidence that weakened their position.
  3. 3. Tendency to go to what we believe is right and marshal arguments to support it Propose exploratory conversations rather than debates or trying to convince
  4. 4. Tendency to go to what we believe is right and marshal arguments to support it Propose exploratory conversations rather than debates or trying to convince We don’t have to oppose or accept other points of view – instead, consider
  5. 5. Tendency to go to what we believe is right and marshal arguments to support it Propose exploratory conversations rather than debates or trying to convince Build dialogue rather than debate – practice in your family or community We don’t have to oppose or accept other points of view – instead, consider
  6. 6. Dialogue is not rocket science 1. Be aware of our own ideas – reflect on them 2. Listen to each other’s ideas 3. Try to deepen our understanding of each other’s ideas
  7. 7. But it does take practice
  8. 8. The goal? conversion — compromise — community The goal is “functional community.”
  9. 9. A number of states in the US have legalized cannabis use and adopted various measures to regulate use in their jurisdictions. Now the Canadian government is committed to going in the same direction. Imagine a discussion following a proposal on campus to allow cannabis use in residence.
  10. 10. Remember 1. Be aware of our own ideas – reflect on them 2. Listen to each other’s ideas 3. Try to deepen our understanding of each other’s ideas 4.
  11. 11. What have we learned • What was your experience when putting yourself in the other’s position? – How did it feel? – Was it comfortable/uncomfortable/ interesting/surprising? • In what way did the experience affect you? Did it have any impact on you at all? • Do you think that you have a better understanding of the other and their ideas now? • How could this approach change a conversation on your campus?
  12. 12. Thank you!

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