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Gopakumar.HSpecialist Neonatology Trainee                      Adelaide
   Sign of both benign and    serious conditions   Exhaustive differential diagnosis   Rare disorder   Overwhelming ad...
   Differential diagnosis of    hypotonia in infants.   Describe the differences between    central and peripheral cause...
Tone is the resistance of muscle tostretch. Clinicians test two kinds of tone:phasic and postural.Phasic tone - The rapid ...
The maintenance of normal tone requires intact central andperipheral nervous system . Hence hypotonia is a commonsymptom o...
Motor unit - One anterior         Neuronopathy - Ahorn cell and all the muscle       primary disorder of thefibers that i...
   Two categories - Central and peripheral disorders .   Peripheral causes include abnormalities in the motor    unit , ...
   Cerebral insult – Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy ,    intracranial haemorrhage   Brain malformations   Chromosomal ...
   Infantile spinal muscular atrophy   Traumatic myelopathy ( esp following breech    delivery )   Hypoxic ischemic mye...
   Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy   Giant axonal neuropathy   Charcot marie tooth disease   Dejerine sottas dis...
   Myasthenia gravis ( Transient acquired    neonatal myasthenia ,congenital myasthenia )   Infantile botulism   Magnes...
   Congenital myopathy   Nemaline myopathy   Central core disease   Myotubular myopathy   Congenital fiber type dispr...
   Congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency   Congenital muscular dystrophy without merosin deficiency   C...
   Disorders of glycogen metabolism ( ex Acid    maltase deficiency )   Severe neonatal phosphofructokinase deficiency ...
The most common central cause of hypotonia ishypoxic encephalopathy / cerebral palsy in theyoung infant. However, this dys...
 Identify cause and the timing of onset Maternal exposures to toxins or infections  suggest a central cause Information...
   A term infant who is born healthy but    develops floppiness after 12 to 24 hours –    suspect inborn error of metabol...
   Motor delay with normal social and language    development decreases the likelihood of    brain pathology.   Loss of ...
A dietary/feeding history may point to diseasesof the neuromuscular junction, which maypresent with sucking and swallowing...
   Developmental delay (a chromosomal    abnormality)   Delayed motor milestones (a congenital    myopathy) and   Prema...
   Any significant family history – affected parents or siblings,    consanguinity, stillbirths, childhood deaths   Mate...
   When lying supine, all hypotonic    infants look much the same,    regardless of the underlying cause    or location o...
   Pectus excavatum    indicates long standing    long-standing weakness    of the chest wall    muscles   Infants who l...
Arthrogryposis varies in severityfrom clubfoot, the most commonmanifestation, to symmetricalflexion deformities of all lim...
High-pitched or unusual-sounding cry -suggests CNS pathologyA weak cry - diaphragmatic weaknessFatigable cry - congenital ...
   A comprehensive neurologic evaluation   Assessment for dysmorphic features   Evaluation of the parents – may point t...
   Detailed neurologic assessment - tone,    strength, and reflexes   Assessment of tone – begin by examining    posture...
Traction response                        Further evaluationVertical suspension                                OfHorizontal...
Baby suspended in theprone position with theexaminer’s palmunderneath the chestNormal infant - keeps thehead erect, mainta...
 The most sensitive measure of postural tone Grasp the hands and pull the infant toward a  sitting position A normal te...
 The traction response is not present in  premature newborns of less than 33 weeks  gestation The presence of more than ...
   The examiner places both hands in the infants    axillae and, without grasping the thorax, lifts    straight up   The...
   Decreased resistance to flexion and extension    of the extremities   Exaggerated hip abduction & ankle    dorsiflexi...
   Deep tendon reflexes (DTRs) often normal /    hyperactive in central conditions   Clonus and primitive reflexes may p...
Course of hypotonia - fluctuating, static, or progressivediscriminates between a static encephalopathy (as is seen inintel...
Usually spares extraocular muscles, whilediseases of the neuromuscular junction may becharacterized by ptosis and extraocu...
   Hepatosplenomegaly – storage disorders,    congenital infections   Renal cysts, high forehead, wide fontanelles –    ...
   Dysmorphic features   Depressed level of consciousness or lethargy   Abnormal eye movements or inability to track vi...
   Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy,    teratogens, and metabolic disorders may    evolve into hyperreflexia and hypertoni...
   Hypotonia,   Generalized weakness   Absent reflexes,   Feeding difficultiesClassic infantile form of spinal muscula...
   Alert infant and appropriate response to    surroundings   Normal sleep-wake patterns   Associated with profound wea...
A systematic approach to a child   who has hypotonia, paying     attention to the history   and clinical examination, is  ...
   Rule out sepsis first - complete blood count , (blood culture,    urine culture, cerebrospinal fluid culture and analy...
   Complex multisystem involvement on clinical    evaluation suggests - inborn errors of metabolism   Presence of acidos...
MRIDelineate structural malformationsNeuronal migration defectsAbnormal signals in the basal ganglia (mitochondrialabnorma...
   Diagnosis mainly by history and clinical    examination   Molecular genetics – CTG repeats, deletions    in SMN gene...
   Creatine kinase (levels need to be interpreted    with caution in the newborn, as levels tend to    be high at birth a...
   Specific DNA testing -    Electrophysiological    for myotonic dystrophy     studies - Shows    and for spinal       ...
   Helps to differentiate a primary myopathy from a    neurogenic disorder   Helps to differentiate myopathies from musc...
   Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)   Trichrome , PAS (for glycogen)   Oil red O (ORO) (for lipids)   Acid phosphatise (for...
Muscular dystrophy - subgroup of myopathiescharacterized by muscle degeneration andregeneration. Clinically, muscular dyst...
   Mainly supportive – feeding ,    neurodevelopment   Physiotherapy   Specific treatment – Pompe disease ( enzyme    r...
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
Approach to floppy infant
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Approach to floppy infant

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This is a practical approach to a neonate with floppiness

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Approach to floppy infant

  1. 1. Gopakumar.HSpecialist Neonatology Trainee Adelaide
  2. 2.  Sign of both benign and serious conditions Exhaustive differential diagnosis Rare disorder Overwhelming advances in diagnosis and management
  3. 3.  Differential diagnosis of hypotonia in infants. Describe the differences between central and peripheral causes of hypotonia. Evaluation of hypotonia in infants.
  4. 4. Tone is the resistance of muscle tostretch. Clinicians test two kinds of tone:phasic and postural.Phasic tone - The rapid contraction inresponse to a high-intensity stretch , asin tendon reflex response .Postural tone - It is the prolongedcontraction of antigravity muscles inresponse to the low-intensity stretch ofgravity. When postural tone is depressed,the trunk and limbs cannot maintainthemselves against gravity and the infantappears floppy.
  5. 5. The maintenance of normal tone requires intact central andperipheral nervous system . Hence hypotonia is a commonsymptom of neurological dysfunction and occurs in diseases of the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles.
  6. 6. Motor unit - One anterior  Neuronopathy - Ahorn cell and all the muscle primary disorder of thefibers that it innervatesmake up a motor unit . The anterior horn cell bodymotor unit is the unit offorce. Therefore, weakness  Neuropathy - ais a symptom of all motor primary disorder of theunit disorders. axon or its myelin covering  Myopathy - a primary disorder of the muscle fiber
  7. 7.  Two categories - Central and peripheral disorders . Peripheral causes include abnormalities in the motor unit , specifically in the anterior horn cell (ie, spinal muscular atrophy), peripheral nerve , neuromuscular junction , and muscle Central causes account for 60% to 80% of hypotonia cases and the peripheral causes occur in 15% to 30%. Considerable overlap of involvement and clinical manifestations
  8. 8.  Cerebral insult – Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy , intracranial haemorrhage Brain malformations Chromosomal disorders – Praderwilli syndrome , Down syndrome Peroxisomal disorders – cerebrohepatorenal syndrome ( Zellweger’s syndrome) , Neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy Other genetic defects – familial dysautonomia , oculocerebrorenal syndrome ( Lowe syndrome ) Neurometabolic disorders – Acid maltase deficiency , infantile GM1 gangliosidosis Drug effects ( ex Maternal Benzodiazepines ) Benign congenital hypotonia
  9. 9.  Infantile spinal muscular atrophy Traumatic myelopathy ( esp following breech delivery ) Hypoxic ischemic myelopathy Infantile neuronal degeneration
  10. 10.  Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy Giant axonal neuropathy Charcot marie tooth disease Dejerine sottas disease
  11. 11.  Myasthenia gravis ( Transient acquired neonatal myasthenia ,congenital myasthenia ) Infantile botulism Magnesium toxicity Aminoglycoside toxicity
  12. 12.  Congenital myopathy Nemaline myopathy Central core disease Myotubular myopathy Congenital fiber type disproportion myopathy Multicore myopathy
  13. 13.  Congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency Congenital muscular dystrophy without merosin deficiency Congenital muscular dystrophy with brain malformations or intellectual disability Dystrophinopathies Walker Warburg disease Muscle – eye – brain disease Fukuyama disease Congenital muscular dystrophy with cerebellar atrophy / hypoplasia Congenital muscular dystrophy with occipital agyria Early infantile facioscapulohumeral dystrophy Congenital myotonic dystrophy
  14. 14.  Disorders of glycogen metabolism ( ex Acid maltase deficiency ) Severe neonatal phosphofructokinase deficiency Severe neonatal phophorylase deficiency Primary carnitine deficiency Peroxisomal disorders Neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy Cerebrohepatorenal syndrome ( zellweger ) Disorders of creatine metabolism Cytochrome c oxidase deficiency
  15. 15. The most common central cause of hypotonia ishypoxic encephalopathy / cerebral palsy in theyoung infant. However, this dysfunction mayprogress in later infancy to hypertonia.The most common neuromuscular causes,although still rare, are congenital myopathies,congenital myotonic dystrophy, and spinalmuscular atrophy.Disorders with both central and peripheralmanifestations ex acid maltase deficiency (Pompedisease).
  16. 16.  Identify cause and the timing of onset Maternal exposures to toxins or infections suggest a central cause Information on fetal movement in utero, fetal presentation, and the amount of amniotic fluid. Low Apgar scores may suggest floppiness from birth Breech delivery or cervical position – cervical spinal cord trauma
  17. 17.  A term infant who is born healthy but develops floppiness after 12 to 24 hours – suspect inborn error of metabolism Infants suffering central injury usually develop increased tone and deep tendon reflexes. Central congenital hypotonia does not worsen with time but may become more readily apparent
  18. 18.  Motor delay with normal social and language development decreases the likelihood of brain pathology. Loss of milestones increases the index of suspicion for neurodegenerative disorders.
  19. 19. A dietary/feeding history may point to diseasesof the neuromuscular junction, which maypresent with sucking and swallowingdifficulties that ‘fatigue’ or ‘get worse’ withrepetition.
  20. 20.  Developmental delay (a chromosomal abnormality) Delayed motor milestones (a congenital myopathy) and Premature death (metabolic or muscle disease).
  21. 21.  Any significant family history – affected parents or siblings, consanguinity, stillbirths, childhood deaths Maternal disease – myotonic dystrophy Pregnancy and delivery history – drug or teratogen exposure  Decreased fetal movements  Abnormal presentation  Polyhydramnios/ oligohydramnios  Apgar scores  Resuscitation requirements  Cord gases History since delivery ◦ Respiratory effort ◦ Ability to feed ◦ Level of alertness ◦ Level of spontaneous activity ◦ Character of cry
  22. 22.  When lying supine, all hypotonic infants look much the same, regardless of the underlying cause or location of the abnormality within the nervous system. Lack spontaneous movement Full abduction of the legs places the lateral surface of the thighs against the examining table, and the arms lie either extended at the sides of the body or flexed at the elbow with the hands beside the head.
  23. 23.  Pectus excavatum indicates long standing long-standing weakness of the chest wall muscles Infants who lie motionless eventually develop flattening of the occiput and loss of hair on the portion of the scalp that is in constant contact with the crib Hip dislocation - The forceful sheet. contraction of muscles pulling the femoral head into the Hip subluxation or acetabulum is a requirement arthrogryposis suggest of normal hip joint formation. hypotonia in utero .
  24. 24. Arthrogryposis varies in severityfrom clubfoot, the most commonmanifestation, to symmetricalflexion deformities of all limb joints.Joint contractures - a nonspecific consequenceof intrauterine immobilization.As a rule, newborns with arthrogryposis whorequire respiratory assistance do not surviveextubation unless the underlying disorder ismyasthenia.
  25. 25. High-pitched or unusual-sounding cry -suggests CNS pathologyA weak cry - diaphragmatic weaknessFatigable cry - congenital myasthenicsyndrome.
  26. 26.  A comprehensive neurologic evaluation Assessment for dysmorphic features Evaluation of the parents – may point towards specific diagnosis as in myotonic dystrophy .
  27. 27.  Detailed neurologic assessment - tone, strength, and reflexes Assessment of tone – begin by examining posture, and movement. A floppy infant often lies with limbs abducted and extended.
  28. 28. Traction response Further evaluationVertical suspension OfHorizontal suspension Hypotonia
  29. 29. Baby suspended in theprone position with theexaminer’s palmunderneath the chestNormal infant - keeps thehead erect, maintains theback straight, and flexesthe elbow, hip, knee, andankle joints Hyptonia - infants drape over the examiners hands, with the head and legs hanging limply
  30. 30.  The most sensitive measure of postural tone Grasp the hands and pull the infant toward a sitting position A normal term infant lifts the head from the surface immediately with the body When attaining the sitting position, the head is erect in the midline for a few seconds. During traction, the examiner should feel the infant pulling back against traction and observe flexion at the elbow, knee, and ankle.
  31. 31.  The traction response is not present in premature newborns of less than 33 weeks gestation The presence of more than minimal head lag and of failure to counter traction by flexion of the limbs in the term newborn is abnormal and indicates hypotonia. By 1 month, normal infants lift the head immediately and maintain it in line with the trunk.
  32. 32.  The examiner places both hands in the infants axillae and, without grasping the thorax, lifts straight up The muscles of the shoulders should have sufficient strength to press down against the examiners hands and allow the infant to suspend vertically without falling through Normal response – Head erect in the midline with flexion at the knee, hip, and ankle joints. When a hypotonic infant is suspended vertically, the head falls forward, the legs dangle, and the infant may slip through the examiners hands because of weakness in the shoulder muscles
  33. 33.  Decreased resistance to flexion and extension of the extremities Exaggerated hip abduction & ankle dorsiflexion Oral-motor dysfunction Poor respiratory efforts Gastroesophageal reflux Note the distribution of weakness ex .face is spared versus the trunk and extremities.
  34. 34.  Deep tendon reflexes (DTRs) often normal / hyperactive in central conditions Clonus and primitive reflexes may persist DTRs - normal, decreased, or absent in peripheral disorders
  35. 35. Course of hypotonia - fluctuating, static, or progressivediscriminates between a static encephalopathy (as is seen inintellectual disability) and a degenerative neurologic condition(eg, spinal muscular atrophy).Distribution of hypotonia – Ex Face involvement Distribution of hypotonia Ex facial involvement
  36. 36. Usually spares extraocular muscles, whilediseases of the neuromuscular junction may becharacterized by ptosis and extraocular muscleweakness .
  37. 37.  Hepatosplenomegaly – storage disorders, congenital infections Renal cysts, high forehead, wide fontanelles – Zellweger’s syndrome Hepatomegaly, retinitis pigmentosa – neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy Congenital cataracts, glaucoma – oculocerebrorenal (Lowe) syndrome Abnormal odour – metabolic disorders Hypopigmentation, undesceded testes – Prader Willi
  38. 38.  Dysmorphic features Depressed level of consciousness or lethargy Abnormal eye movements or inability to track visually Early onset seizures Apnea Exaggerated irregular breathing patterns. Predominant axial weakness Normal strength with hypotonia scissoring on vertical suspension Fisting of the hands Hyperactive or normal reflexes Malformations of other organs
  39. 39.  Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, teratogens, and metabolic disorders may evolve into hyperreflexia and hypertonia, but most syndromes do not. Infants who have experienced central injury usually develop increased tone and deep tendon reflexes
  40. 40.  Hypotonia, Generalized weakness Absent reflexes, Feeding difficultiesClassic infantile form of spinal muscularatrophyFasciculations of the tongue as well as anintention tremor.Affected infants have alert, inquisitive faces butprofound distal weakness.
  41. 41.  Alert infant and appropriate response to surroundings Normal sleep-wake patterns Associated with profound weakness Hypotonia and hyporeflexia / areflexia Other features - muscle atrophy, lack of abnormalities of other organs, the presence of respiratory and feeding impairment, and impairments of ocular or facial movement
  42. 42. A systematic approach to a child who has hypotonia, paying attention to the history and clinical examination, is paramount in localizing the problem to a specific region of the nervous system.
  43. 43.  Rule out sepsis first - complete blood count , (blood culture, urine culture, cerebrospinal fluid culture and analysis); Measurement of serum electrolytes – calcium and magnesium Liver function tests Urine drug screen Thyroid function tests TORCH titers (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus infection, herpesvirus infections) and a urine culture for cytomegalovirus ( hepatosplenomegaly and brain calcifications ) Karyotype – Dysmorphism EEG – helps in prognostication Genetic studies - Array comparative genomic hybridization study, methylation study for 15q11.2 (Prader-Willi/Angelman) imprinting defects, and testing for known disorders with specific mutational analysis
  44. 44.  Complex multisystem involvement on clinical evaluation suggests - inborn errors of metabolism Presence of acidosis - plasma amino acids and urine organic acids (aminoacidopathies and organic acidemias) Serum lactate in disorders of carbohydrate metabolism, mitochondrial disease Pyruvate and ammonia in urea cycle defects Acylcarnitine profile in organic acidemia, fatty acid oxidation disorder Very long-chain fatty acids and plasmalogens - specific for the evaluation of a peroxisomal disorder.
  45. 45. MRIDelineate structural malformationsNeuronal migration defectsAbnormal signals in the basal ganglia (mitochondrialabnormalities) or brain stem defects (Joubert syndrome)Deep white matter changes can be seen in Lowe syndrome, aperoxisomal defectAbnormalities in the corpus callosum may occur in Smith- Lemli-Opitz syndromeHeterotopias may be seen in congenital muscular dystrophy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy Magnetic resonance spectroscopy also can be revealing for metabolic disease.
  46. 46.  Diagnosis mainly by history and clinical examination Molecular genetics – CTG repeats, deletions in SMN gene Nerve conduction studies and muscle biopsy (Depending on clinical situation, may be delayed until around 6 months of age as neonatal results are difficult to interpret)
  47. 47.  Creatine kinase (levels need to be interpreted with caution in the newborn, as levels tend to be high at birth and increase in the first 24 hours, they also increase with acidosis). Repeat after few days , if initial value is elevated Elevated in muscular dystrophy but not in spinal muscular atrophy or in many myopathies.
  48. 48.  Specific DNA testing -  Electrophysiological for myotonic dystrophy studies - Shows and for spinal abnormalities in muscular atrophy ( nerves, myopathies, SMN gene ) and disorders of the neuromuscular junction  Normal EMG usually suggest central hypotonia , with few exceptions
  49. 49.  Helps to differentiate a primary myopathy from a neurogenic disorder Helps to differentiate myopathies from muscular dystrophies Useful in the work-up of undiagnosed weakness Provide the diagnosis of specific muscular conditions, such as a muscular dystrophy, metabolic or storage myopathies, and inflammatory myopathies. Helps to differentiate active from inactive and acute from chronic conditions. Additional clues can be derived from ultrastructural changes seen with the electron microscope. Various biochemical and genetic studies can be performed on fresh or frozen muscle tissue to measure enzyme levels and perform DNA studies for certain genetic diseases
  50. 50.  Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) Trichrome , PAS (for glycogen) Oil red O (ORO) (for lipids) Acid phosphatise (for lysosomal activity) Congo red and cresyl violet (for amyloid) Myosin ATP ase Staining is useful for fiber-type differentiation Oxidative markers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reductase (NADH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and cytochrome C oxidase(COX), are most effective in the diagnosis of enzymatic deficiencies Myophosphorylase and myoadenylate deaminase (AMPAD) for enzyme deficiencies acetylcholinesterase silver stain, may be required in certain cases to show the motor endplates
  51. 51. Muscular dystrophy - subgroup of myopathiescharacterized by muscle degeneration andregeneration. Clinically, muscular dystrophies Muscle dystrophiesare typically progressive, because the muscles Versusability to regenerate is eventually lost, leading Congenital myopathiesto progressive weakness, often leading to use ofa wheel chair and eventually death, usuallyrelated to respiratory weakness Congenital myopathies - do not show evidence for either a progressive dystrophic process (i.e., muscle death) or inflammation, but instead characteristic microscopic changes are seen in association with reduced contractile ability of the muscles.
  52. 52.  Mainly supportive – feeding , neurodevelopment Physiotherapy Specific treatment – Pompe disease ( enzyme replacement therapy )

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