Extent 2013 Obninsk High Performance Messaging

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Solace Systems - "High Performance Messaging"
Clive Andrews, Sales Director, Solace Systems
Mathew Hobbis, Senior Solutions Architect, Solace Systems

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Extent 2013 Obninsk High Performance Messaging

  1. 1. The Evolution of MessagingThe Rise of the Appliance Clive Andrews Mat Hobbis
  2. 2. Adoption Cycles Functionality& Performance Time
  3. 3. Adoption Cycles Functionality& Performance Time
  4. 4. Considerations in SelectingHardware vs. Software
  5. 5. Hardware: Extreme Performance
  6. 6. Hardware: Predictable Behavior
  7. 7. Hardware: Massive Scale
  8. 8. Hardware: 24x7x365 Reliability
  9. 9. Hardware: Cost
  10. 10. Software: Versatility
  11. 11. Hardware Productsare Widely Availableand Simple to Deploy
  12. 12. Applying the Appliance Advantage to Middleware Enterprise o Easier Operation Appliances o Lower TCO Software o Higher Performanceon Servers IP Web Storage Database Messaging Routing Infrastructure Middleware
  13. 13. Don’t Make Headlines“India stock exchangeflash crash erasesUS$58 Billion”October 2012 “IT leaders face “Facebook crashes pay cut after TSE the Nasdaq” outage” December 2012 August 2012
  14. 14. Application Evolution15CONFIDENTIAL
  15. 15. Event Driven Architecture (i) • Need to be Agile. • Increased Regulation . Audit, “Real-Time” Global Risk and P&L • Drive EDA for scale and resilience – drives message bus requirements • Bus Latencies and Throughput important Trade Bus Trade Bus OMS Post Trade DB OMS Post Trade DB Sub Dist Svc Persist Sub Dist Svc Persist Monitor /Staging Bus Monitor / Staging Bus16 Risk P&L
  16. 16. Event Driven Architecture (ii) • Co-Locate Processes where Latency is key Shm Q • Shared Memory IPC within host (Same API) Crossing SOR • Non “on host” components also need Engine Low Latency Connections. Physical Host • Lower Latency requirements of Staging area allow message batching – Turn Message Rate problem into a Trade Bus Bandwidth Problem • Need High Availability and recovery OMS Post Trade DB options Sub Dist Svc Persist • Need Disaster Recovery options17CONFIDENIAL
  17. 17. Product Architecture18CONFIDENTIAL
  18. 18. Networked Architecture • Hardware-based middleware overlay for IP networks • All Message QoS in one Appliance – Reliable/Persistent/Web Streaming • WAN Optimisation and Compression • Comprehensive Statistics and Monitoring19CONFIDENTIAL
  19. 19. Modular Addition of Functionality Administration, subscriptions Control Plane and stats collection never impact performance Data Plane Capabilities embedded in High-Speed Interconnect FPGAs and network processors, added via modular architecture - Build to suit - Scale within footprint Solace Blades - Easy upgrades (PCIe Cards) (10 blades in 3260, 5 blades in 3230)20CONFIDENTIAL
  20. 20. Reliable Messaging 60 • Pure hardware solution Avg 54 50 – No operating system 99.9th 39 40 – No context switching Micro- 30 32 seconds 30 25 26 35 – No interrupts of 29 24 26 Latency 20 – No data copies 22 23 10 • 10 million messages/second 0 – Can be any combination, e.g. 500K/500K 1M/1M 2M/2M 3M/3M 4M/4M 5M/5M 5M in & 5M out, 2M in & 8M out Messages per Second Bulk Message Size Message Rate User Payload Message (bytes) (msgs/sec) Bandwidth (Mbps) Rate 100 5,930,000 4,744 500 2,080,000 8,320 1,000 1,080,000 8,640 10GigE Line Rate 12,000 92,000 8,832 is the Limit 30,000 34,000 8,16021CONFIDENTIAL
  21. 21. Guaranteed Messaging; Store & Forward Performance 180 Failsafe w/o overhead 160 Avg 154 of persisting every 140 120 99.9th 114 123 99 message to disk Micro- 100 90 88 91 seconds 80 98 of 79 84 60 69 69 69 73 200K msgs/sec ingress Latency 40 and 200K msgs/sec 20 0 egress 2,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 100,000 125,000 150,000 Messages per Second Latency steady even 206,400 202,000 ADB-3 Software Broker while recovering when 200,000 Msg Rate (Msg/sce) 157,500 disconnected 150,000 124,400 subscribers reconnect 100,000 50,000 0 500 1,000 2,000 4,000 22 ADB Message RatesCONFIDENTIAL
  22. 22. Guaranteed Messaging; Cut Through Persistence Latency Low, consistent latency for low latency trading applications Can also have store & forward clients for same published message Queues can have low and high priority limits set. During congestion : Reject new orders Process changes to23CONFIDENTIAL existing orders
  23. 23. Steady in Face of Slow Consumers o Latency stays consistent even through disconnection and re- connection of clients o Re-connected subscribers “catch up” without impacting other clients 180 170 160 Avg 140 99.9th 120 113 103 103 Micro- 100 seconds of 80 89 Latency 60 74 75 74 40 20 0 Pre-Failure Spooling Catchup/Recovery Post-Recovery Period of Test24CONFIDENTIAL
  24. 24. IPC Shared Memory Messaging • Single API session for: Core Core – Communications between processes 1 2 on one OS instance – Topic-based pub/sub and request/reply Shared – Any-to-any messaging Memory – Reliable delivery Core Core • Applications can block or busy-wait 3 4 • C API for Linux, Solaris and Windows • Move apps to IPC with no application changes 1 publisher -> 1 subscriber • 2.91 million msgs/sec; 128 byte messages • Average latency 431 nanoseconds 99th percentile 480 nanoseconds 6x6 mesh simulation of fanout/fanin • 46.8 million messages per second • 154.5 gigabits per second25CONFIDENTIAL
  25. 25. Thanks……

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