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ARTIST RESEARCH &
INSPIRATION.
Kate Burton.

Time Based Studies.
SAM JAVANROUH:
I have chosen this specific photograph by
Sam Javanrouh as it inspires me to create
representations of time...
HAROLD EDGERTON
This image, taken in 1957, was an attempt at a
decisive moment photograph by Edgerton. He felt
that as wel...
LINDA CONNOR
The star trails shown in these images are the
result of several hours of exposure that
allowed the camera to ...
HIROSHI SUGIMOTO
This image was taken over the space of ninety
minute – the average length of a feature film. It
was made ...
HIROSHI SUGIMOTO
This image of the Ligurian Sea, Saviore was taken in
1982. I think the artist evokes a sense of calm and
...
HENRI CARTIER - BRESSON
Here a man is captured trying to leap over a large
puddle, one that his reflection can be seen in ...
RICHARD BILLINGHAM
This image captures Billingham’s parents
in a documentary style. His tactic was to
get in close so that...
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Artist Research & Inspiration - Time Based Studies

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Artist Research & Inspiration - Time Based Studies

  1. 1. ARTIST RESEARCH & INSPIRATION. Kate Burton. Time Based Studies.
  2. 2. SAM JAVANROUH: I have chosen this specific photograph by Sam Javanrouh as it inspires me to create representations of time in such a vast way. The cityscape is a perfect way to show the beauty in both day and night as the lights can be seen to gradually flicker on in one photograph and we can see how the crowd and traffic thins throughout the day. I think the main message of this photograph is how easily it can be shown that the city can always be bursting with life and activity at anytime, just in different ways. This work was made by keeping a camera in the same place all day and using timelapse photography to set the camera to take a photo every so often. Then these individual photograph have been put together most likely using Photoshop, to easily display the gradual contrast. I may attempt to capture a different landscape with this same technique, instead of a cityscape. I plan to go to spots in the countryside where, on a clear day, you can see along to Whitby and at night the lights stretch across the horizon.
  3. 3. HAROLD EDGERTON This image, taken in 1957, was an attempt at a decisive moment photograph by Edgerton. He felt that as well as being a photograph it’s a wonder of science because of what the fast shutter speed captured at a ‘stand still’. The inclusion of the bright coloured paint that the milk is being dropped into not only helps the centre of the image stand out, but enhances the smallest detail of the shape created – making the image appear bold from what was something small and delicate.
  4. 4. LINDA CONNOR The star trails shown in these images are the result of several hours of exposure that allowed the camera to register the light. One of the recurring subjects in the images by Connor are light and illumination. I think the artist links the aspects of the old and the new through the inclusion of the trees and rocks in the foreground of the stellar activity that has been captured through the passing of time and the movement of the earth that is included in the image.
  5. 5. HIROSHI SUGIMOTO This image was taken over the space of ninety minute – the average length of a feature film. It was made with a 8 x 10 inch camera. Although the cinema was completely full, neither the audience or the film can be seen. This is the result of time being captured to only show what is sustained throughout the length of the image being taken. Another effect of a slow shutter speed.
  6. 6. HIROSHI SUGIMOTO This image of the Ligurian Sea, Saviore was taken in 1982. I think the artist evokes a sense of calm and yet – foreboding through the use of the light fading into the dark, as the sky fades into the sea. The soft use of focus is a result of the slow shutter speed, which helps to create an extreme feeling of definitive silence. I am drawn to the artist use of the range of grey tones, which stops the image from representing anything other than the water and air – colourless.
  7. 7. HENRI CARTIER - BRESSON Here a man is captured trying to leap over a large puddle, one that his reflection can be seen in just before he lands in. Because of this the image is seen as a decisive moment image – an idea that Cartier Bresson came up with himself. The artist creates a sense of ‘living in the moment’ as it is shown that this man took a chance and is forever frozen in time at the point were his chance may have went wrong. I like the way that the main attention – the man – is silhouetted against everything else that is shown in detail, as he is the one in movement and he is the one that photo is about.
  8. 8. RICHARD BILLINGHAM This image captures Billingham’s parents in a documentary style. His tactic was to get in close so that the viewer felt involved as he acknowledged his parents in their own living space as they got on with their lives. I felt it would be good to look at this artist and his documentary styled work for if I ever decided to look away from the technical side of Time Based Studies, and tried capturing time with people instead.

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