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Institutional Change and
Social Learning: Keys to
Sustainable
Development Outcomes
Blane Harvey, Research Associate, Overs...
The challenge
 Current responses to the “double exposure” of climate change &
development short of the scale of impact ne...
Failure to incorporate reflexive learning […]
could manifest itself in misguided policy
positions and an inability to ass...
Source: Ensor & Harvey, WIREs Clim Change 2015; See also Harvey et al. 2013
Our proposal
 However, recent evidence also suggests that the rise in audit
culture and a ‘results agenda’ creates disinc...
 Assess and articulate the case for support
 Make learning a dimension of organisational performance
 Empower learning ...
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Institutional Change and Social Learning: Keys to Sustainable Development Outcomes I Blane Harvey for Our Common Future 2015

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By adopting evidence of how social learning can help address global climate and development challenges, large global funding and implementation bodies can catalyse a step-change in how we plan, support, and measure research for complex development challenges, particularly climate change. Learn more: www.ccafs.cgiar.org

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Institutional Change and Social Learning: Keys to Sustainable Development Outcomes I Blane Harvey for Our Common Future 2015

  1. 1. Institutional Change and Social Learning: Keys to Sustainable Development Outcomes Blane Harvey, Research Associate, Overseas Development Institute Wiebke Foerch, CCAFS, ICRAF; Tonya Schuetz, CCAFS; Philip Thornton, CCAFS, ILRI; Ewen LeBorgne, CCAFS, ILRI
  2. 2. The challenge  Current responses to the “double exposure” of climate change & development short of the scale of impact needed.  Not just an issue of resourcing, but how to best use limited resources to address complex challenges.  Research & practice show iterative, learning-based approaches are well suited to these types of challenges (Folke 2005; Pelling et al. 2008)  Lots of recent evidence on effectiveness and emerging good practice from social learning approaches at local & SES scales…  …but limited evidence of effective use within organisations that are financing and designing adaptation action. (ICAI 2014; Harrington et al 2015; Harvey et al 2012)
  3. 3. Failure to incorporate reflexive learning […] could manifest itself in misguided policy positions and an inability to assess the changing science of climate change, with serious consequences for practitioners and funding… (Boyd & Osbahr 2010: 630)
  4. 4. Source: Ensor & Harvey, WIREs Clim Change 2015; See also Harvey et al. 2013
  5. 5. Our proposal  However, recent evidence also suggests that the rise in audit culture and a ‘results agenda’ creates disincentives for learning, experimentation or the risk of failure. (M&C Saatchi 2015; Ramalingam 2011)  So, where next? By adopting evidence of how social learning can help address global climate and development challenges, large global funding and implementation bodies can catalyse a step-change in how we plan, support, and measure research for complex development challenges, particularly climate change.
  6. 6.  Assess and articulate the case for support  Make learning a dimension of organisational performance  Empower learning leaders and champions  Embed learning processes in to the core of programming work  Broaden existing learning processes  Invest in capacity  Measure and communicate their impacts and outcomes Ways forward: Elements of a pathway for institutional transformation

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