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From coach to owner - What I learned from the other side

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I have been working in the software industry for more than twenty years and for the past ten years I have been a fervent advocate of high quality software, test-first development, lean practices and agile methodologies.

I worked as a developer, architect, business analyst, manager and agile coach, and two years ago the unthinkable happened. I became an owner. I decided to build my own product for lean project management called SmartView and doing so presented a set of challenges that I never encountered before.

I used to put always methodology first and never budge before a deadline. Now that the money was my own and the timelines seem more daunting I had to grab Agile by the horns and make decisions and sacrifices in order to stay on budget and hit the desired dates.

My journey gave me a new perspective on what is key to succeed and what agile means to owners and decision makers.

Let me share with you what I learned so far that can help you reach your goals, how to fight the fear of never releasing; and make sure that Agile works for you and not the other way around.

Published in: Technology
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From coach to owner - What I learned from the other side

  1. 1. From Coach to Owner
  2. 2. Using Agile from the Other Side
  3. 3. 20 years ago I became a senior dev
  4. 4. 15 years ago I became an architect
  5. 5. 10 years ago I became a tech lead and trainer
  6. 6. 6 years ago I became an Agile coach
  7. 7. 2 years ago THE UNTHINKABLE!
  8. 8. http://smartviewapp.com The Smartest tool for lean project management
  9. 9. The story goes...
  10. 10. Switching to the Other Side
  11. 11. New concerns
  12. 12. Never deliver
  13. 13. Lack of users
  14. 14. Run out of money
  15. 15. Sleeping on the couch
  16. 16. Trust my experience
  17. 17. Lean on others to narrow gaps
  18. 18. Building a Great Team
  19. 19. Experienced professionals
  20. 20. Self sufficient
  21. 21. Graphic design from day one
  22. 22. Quality first
  23. 23. Adhere to a methodology
  24. 24. Distributed team
  25. 25. Lessons learned
  26. 26. Search for the best takes time
  27. 27. But it pays off!
  28. 28. Tools for team communication are essential
  29. 29. Mitigate panic by trusting a process
  30. 30. Lead by example
  31. 31. Managing Requirements
  32. 32. Reality always wins
  33. 33. Requirements will change
  34. 34. Spare the details until you are ready
  35. 35. User Stories
  36. 36. Placeholder for Conversation
  37. 37. Fits in a card
  38. 38. Focus on adding value
  39. 39. Lessons learned
  40. 40. Use the format as a guideline
  41. 41. When in doubt... write a story for later
  42. 42. Don’t let acceptance criteria slip
  43. 43. Make sure you have scenarios
  44. 44. Lead by example
  45. 45. Planning Releases
  46. 46. Avoid status meetings
  47. 47. Visualize Releases
  48. 48. Visualize Priorities
  49. 49. Visualize Progress
  50. 50. Story Map
  51. 51. Manage your backlog from the Story Map
  52. 52. Lessons learned
  53. 53. Keep the releases short
  54. 54. Celebrate each release
  55. 55. Update expectations often
  56. 56. Scope creep
  57. 57. Simplify features in order to hit deadlines
  58. 58. Listen to your users
  59. 59. Lead by example
  60. 60. Delivering Value
  61. 61. Visualize work status
  62. 62. Kanban board
  63. 63. Use scenarios to drive automated testing
  64. 64. Find your capacity
  65. 65. Estimate using my team’s velocity
  66. 66. Get better at it
  67. 67. Retrospective meetings keep the team healthy
  68. 68. Lessons learned
  69. 69. Deployment from day one
  70. 70. Balance between quality and releasing value
  71. 71. Negotiate scope but keep quality high
  72. 72. Don’t be afraid of splitting stories
  73. 73. Review capacity often
  74. 74. Find bugs before the users do
  75. 75. Value user experience
  76. 76. Lead by example
  77. 77. Succeed as a Team
  78. 78. Be a user as well as a developer
  79. 79. Believe in the team
  80. 80. Believe in the process
  81. 81. Less of “How come it’s not ready?”
  82. 82. More of “How can I help?”
  83. 83. Lead by example
  84. 84. Guidelines are a great start... find what works for you and your team
  85. 85. Thank you!
  86. 86. http://smartviewapp.com The Smartest tool for lean project management
  87. 87. amir@barylko.com @abarylko http://bit.ly/abarylkop
  88. 88. Photo Credit • Under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ • Joe Cheng, DSC_7820-01, http://flic.kr/p/2Zt2u • Bill Ward, Derek Schin's Trucks 1, http://flic.kr/p/m5L5S • Jeremy Keith, Roast beef, http://flic.kr/p/TKUz • Rob Campbell, Field of daisies, http://flic.kr/p/6QJjU4 • Karin Dalziel, The Thinker, http://flic.kr/p/4UYArc
  89. 89. Photo Credit 2 • Under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ • Don LaVange, To Irene, https://flic.kr/p/49ihZX • Under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/ • Derick Bailey, SOLID Motivational Posters, http://bit.ly/17aVaHg • MGA Roadster 1600 in Chariot Red: http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C414652 • Cone of Uncertainty, http://www.agilenutshell.com/cone_of_uncertainty • Burning Money, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Money_burning#mediaviewer/ File:Burning-money-and-yuanbao-at-the-cemetery-3249.JPG

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