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CEO COMMUNICATIONS AUDIT
Rod Drury, Xero
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
2
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
This audit has been prepared for Rod Drury, CEO at Xero.
It is a broad review of CEO communications...
Introduction and overview
CEO Communication Audit - Table of contents:
Communications requirements differ substantially by...
4
1.  Current communications
Where you’re starting from today
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
CEO communications capability– Rod Drury
5
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
Speaking capability
 
Why it matters? Speaking is the bedr...
6
2. Current awareness and
positioning
How the market thinks about you and your business
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
Where is Rod Drury most commonly positioned at present?
7
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
On this slide, we’re looking to see how a b...
Where is Xero most commonly positioned at present?
8
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
Source: Google News Archives, Top 50 results (se...
(55%, 37%)
As a result, we’re benchmarking the following comparables
Stephen KellyTim Reed Brad D. SmithRod Drury
Relative...
10
3. Thought leadership fundamentals
Great CEO communicators are trusted, interesting and
visible
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
Great CEO communicators are trusted, interesting and visible
3. Visible
1. Interesting 2. Trusted
2. Trusted
Signals we lo...
Content examples we’ve analysed in depth
12
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
As a basis for this audit we’ve picked five typical marke...
How Rod performs on the interest benchmark
Human first:
Talks with full range of
emotions:
Tells stories:
Short messages,
...
How Rod performs on the trust benchmark
Shows appropriate
vulnerability:
Communication that shows appropriate
vulnerabilit...
How Rod performs on the visibility benchmark
Is accessible across a
range of platforms:
Addresses multiple
audiences:
Has ...
16
4. CEO and company narrative
Identifying and strengthening your current narrative
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
What is a CEO narrative (and why does it matter)?
Difference
Purpose
FuturePast Narrative
What’s the difference between
me...
Identifying ways to strengthen CEO narrative
Past
Key narrative questions:
1.  Where has the company come from?
2.  What w...
19
5. Stakeholder review and
prioritisation
Identifying your key audience(s)
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
What are the key audience groups for all CEO communication?
The next page presents an audience prioritisation analysis for...
What are the key audience groups for Rod Drury and Xero?
Industry influencers/analysts Regulators/GovernmentInvestors Empl...
22
6. Theme/topic prioritisation
Identifying the most important themes and topics to
communicate to stakeholders
DRAFT FOR...
What are the themes that CEOs should communicate on?
Customer–
Current
Customer-Potential
Partner–
Current
Partner–
Potent...
Our recommended theme allocation for Rod Drury
Customer -
Current
Customer -
Potential
Partner - Current
Partner -
Potenti...
25
7. Content style analysis and
recommendations
Reviewing the coherence of language, tone and style
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
Content style recommendations for Rod Drury
Idiocentric:Reader centric:
Practical:Theoretical:
Complex:Simple:
Balanced:Op...
Content style recommendations for Rod Drury
Corporate:Personal:
Formal:Conversational:
Written on a personal level.
Could ...
28
Summary, recommendations and
next steps
Bringing it all together
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
Executive summary: Rod Drury and Xero
1. Rod is a strong communicator (but could benefit from more frequent
storytelling)
...
Validation and leveraging this audit
4. Content plan
(themes and topics)
•  Building a detailed plan of
content themes and...
The roadmap from here
1. CEO communication
audit
(this document)
2. Thought leadership
strategy
3. Supported CEO
blogging
...
32
Appendix
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
The press articles supporting this analysis
33
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
Ar#cle	 Title	 URL	 Individuals	 Organisa#ons	
1	Xero	...
About Thought Leadership Partners
34
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
At TLP, we’re a specialist agency that builds thought leadership...
+61 3 9111 5659 | www.thoughtleadershippartners.com | Level 17 / 31 Queen St, Melbourne
DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
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CEO Communication Audit - Rod Drury, Xero

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A broad review of CEO communications, with the aim of building front-of-mind thought leadership.
This audit reviews:
> Current communications: Where you’re starting from today
(from page 4)
> How the market thinks about you and your business
(from page 6)
> The key fundamentals of thought leadership
(from page 10)
> Your current narrative as communicated to market
(from page 16)
> Prioritisation of key audiences, themes and topics
(from page 19)
> Coherence of content style, language and tone
(from page 25)

Published in: Leadership & Management
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CEO Communication Audit - Rod Drury, Xero

  1. 1. CEO COMMUNICATIONS AUDIT Rod Drury, Xero DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  2. 2. 2 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION This audit has been prepared for Rod Drury, CEO at Xero. It is a broad review of CEO communications, with the aim of building front- of-mind thought leadership. This audit reviews: Current communications: Where you’re starting from today (from page 4) How the market thinks about you and your business (from page 6) The key fundamentals of thought leadership (from page 10) Your current narrative as communicated to market (from page 16) Prioritisation of key audiences, themes and topics (from page 19) Coherence of content style, language and tone (from page 25) Summary and recommendations (from page 29)
  3. 3. Introduction and overview CEO Communication Audit - Table of contents: Communications requirements differ substantially by stage of the organisation and individual profile. We review CEO communications relative to current stage of the company and existing public profile. 1. Current communications – Where you’re starting from today. • Quick CEO capability review across speaking, inbound (media), outbound (publishing) and social channels 2. Current awareness and positioning - How the market thinks about you and your business • Benchmarking you vs. comparable organisations and leaders for current awareness (and brand vs. CEO awareness) 3. Thought leadership fundamentals - Great CEO communicators are trusted, interesting and visible • Detailed review of five recent CEO communications for thought leadership fundamentals (interest, trust and visibility) 4. CEO and company narrative - Identifying and strengthening your current narrative • Review of your current narrative as communicated to market 5. Stakeholder review and prioritisation - Identifying your key audience(s) • Prioritisation of Xero’s different audience groups for CEO communications 6. Topic prioritisation - Identifying the most important themes and topics to communicate to stakeholders • Defining broad theme/topic prioritisation based on audience group prioritisation 7. Content analysis and recommendations - Reviewing the coherence of language, tone and style • Recommendations as to the tone and style of thought leadership content to achieve best results 3 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Xero Rod Drury Earlystage Industryawareness HighLow Generalmarketawareness HighLow CEO – High industry awareness Company – Moderate general market awareness Current brand and CEO awareness:
  4. 4. 4 1.  Current communications Where you’re starting from today DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  5. 5. CEO communications capability– Rod Drury 5 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Speaking capability   Why it matters? Speaking is the bedrock of all communications. Speaking capability is the foundation on which all other channels and mediums depend.   We start with a quick assessment of communications capability, across the four key communications pillars for the modern CEO. Rare Occasional Frequent Frequency of speaking appearances: Fundamentals: Presents as enthusiastic and full of energy: Tells stories: Is interesting (never boring): Naturally uses facial expressions and hands (isn’t stiff or wooden): Uses a full range of emotions: Controls the room / engages the audience: Uses humour appropriately: Has vocal control and is engaging to listen to: Inbound (media) capability   Why it matters? Traditional PR skills still matter. As the content creation and consumption cycle accelerates, it’s critical to deliver concise, clear, on-topic messages for print, radio, TV and online publications. Rare Occasional Frequent Frequency of media appearances: Fundamentals: Has clear rationale for speaking to the media: Guides the journalist to what’s really important: Stays authentic, doesn’t change speaking style for the medium: Is visually engaging and interesting to watch: Is prepared. Knows the questions that are likely to be asked: Comfortable and never perturbed. Often having fun: Maintains control and is not reactive: Outbound (publishing) capability Why it matters? In today’s media environment, every individual is a publisher. Given the fractured media landscape, it’s never been more important to build a direct (owned) channel to communicate to all key stakeholders. Rare Occasional Frequent Frequency of publishing: Fundamentals: Has built an engaged audience: Publishes frequently to build rapport: Publishes proactively, not just reactively: Writes conversationally (doesn’t use corporate jargon): Uses descriptive, engaging headlines: Integrates multiple multimedia (video, images): Provokes discussion and sharing: Social (engagement) capability Why it matters? Key stakeholders (including customers, partners and employees) increasingly expect to find the CEO on social media. People increasingly look to build trust in individuals before brands. Rare Occasional Frequent Frequency of social engagement: Fundamentals: Active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Youtube: Provokes discussion: Demonstrates curiosity: Incorporates personal passions. Talks about more than just work: Connects to corporate resources where appropriate: Stays positive (doesn’t engage with trolls): Shows emotion:
  6. 6. 6 2. Current awareness and positioning How the market thinks about you and your business DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  7. 7. Where is Rod Drury most commonly positioned at present? 7 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION On this slide, we’re looking to see how a broad set of your stakeholders think about and position Rod Drury. On the left, we’ve visualised individuals who feature alongside Rod in prominent press articles. Larger bubbles represent more frequent mentions alongside Rod. The group is largely industry based, featuring other accounting executives, Xero’s management team and investors. Source: Google News Archives, Top 50 results (see page 33)
  8. 8. Where is Xero most commonly positioned at present? 8 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Source: Google News Archives, Top 50 results (see page 33) On this slide, we’re looking to see how a broad set of your stakeholders think about and position Xero. On the left, we’ve visualised organisations who feature alongside Xero in prominent press articles. Larger bubbles represent more frequent mentions alongside Xero. From a broad stakeholder perspective, the most logical comparable organisations for Xero are accounting software businesses.
  9. 9. (55%, 37%) As a result, we’re benchmarking the following comparables Stephen KellyTim Reed Brad D. SmithRod Drury Relative CEO and brand awareness: Internal metrics LTM revenue: $208 M Valuation: $2.43 Bn Employees: 1,600 External metrics Search volume (Brand) 77% Search volume (CEO): 35% Alexa rank: 2,269 Internal metrics LTM revenue: $178 M Valuation: $2.17 Bn Employees: 1,900 Internal metrics LTM revenue: $4.2 Bn Valuation: $ 29.8 Bn Employees: 8,800 Internal metrics LTM revenue: $1.76 Bn Valuation: $7.06 B Employees: 13,200 External metrics Search volume (Brand) 37% Search volume (CEO): 55% Alexa rank: 49,064 External metrics Search volume (Brand) 100% Search volume (CEO): 90% Alexa rank: 510 External metrics Search volume (Brand) 78% Search volume (CEO): 100% Alexa rank: 15,815 50% 75% 100%25%0% 0% 50% 100% 75% 25% Brand presence CEO presence (78%, 100%) (77%, 35%) (100, 90%) CEO centric Risks around succession and long-term awareness Brand centric Not humanised, risks around trust, •  This chart benchmarks relative awareness for both brand and individual CEO •  All numbers are Google search volumes for “Organisation” and “CEO name”. 100% represents maximum search volume for any term over last 12 months. Source: Annual reports, Google Trends, Alexa We’re benchmarking the following comparables: 9 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Source: Google Trends worldwide search volume (LTM, shown on a relative basis)
  10. 10. 10 3. Thought leadership fundamentals Great CEO communicators are trusted, interesting and visible DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  11. 11. Great CEO communicators are trusted, interesting and visible 3. Visible 1. Interesting 2. Trusted 2. Trusted Signals we look for: •  Shows appropriate vulnerability •  Individually relatable •  Consistently communicates the same narrative over time •  Connected to society as a whole, not just the business •  Has a clear purpose See page 14 for a relative assessment 1. Interesting Signals we look for: •  Human first •  Talks with full range of emotions •  Tells stories •  Short messages, consistent long- term narratives •  Talks about the future •  Appropriate mix of crazy and inevitability •  Avoids robo-speak / corporate language See page 13 for a relative assessment 3. Visible Signals we look for: •  Is accessible across a range of platforms •  Addresses multiple audiences •  Has public views on corporate, industry and societal issues •  Regularly quoted by third parties See page 15 for a relative assessment Interesting and visible is a trap that many politicians and CEOs fall into by being heavily reactive. Whilst this positioning does lead to airtime and profile, it leads to very little influence and action because there’s no underlying foundation of trust. Trusted and visible is a position that’s hard to achieve without substantial conferred status and trust (i.e. the position of Governor General). Anyone with this positioning will always achieve stronger communications performance by being more interesting. It has never been more important to get the right balance of interest and trust. Old media PR strategies often focused excessively on interest factors without a foundation of trust. Social media has reshaped stakeholder expectations, substantially increasing the importance of authenticity. 11 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  12. 12. Content examples we’ve analysed in depth 12 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION As a basis for this audit we’ve picked five typical market facing communications featuring or authored by Rod. This analysis is our basis for understanding current CEO communications to stakeholders (including story, narrative and style). The content we’re using in this audit: •  Redefining the art of bookkeeping •  21 October 2016 •  https://www.linkedin.com/ pulse/redefining-art- bookkeeping-rod-drury? trk=prof-post •  Becoming a $1 billion business •  20 July 2016 •  https://www.xero.com/blog/ 2016/07/becoming-1- billion-business/ •  This is the secret to a successful negotiation •  14 May 2015 •  http://fortune.com/ 2016/05/14/xero- negotiations-skills-success/ •  The financial web, continuous certification and banking •  25 August 2015 •  https://www.xero.com/blog/ 2015/08/financial-web- continuous-certification- banking/ •  Respecting double entry accounting •  11 September 2016 •  https://www.linkedin.com/ pulse/respecting-double- entry-accounting-rod-drury? trk=prof-post
  13. 13. How Rod performs on the interest benchmark Human first: Talks with full range of emotions: Tells stories: Short messages, consistent long-term narratives: Appropriate mix of crazy and inevitability: Avoids robo-speak / corporate language: Communicates concisely, on consistent topics. Evidence of long-term narrative. Evidence of your personal values and beliefs. Talking about your personal life, sharing and celebrating special events. Regular evidence of communication with a full range of emotions. Communicates through stories, not messages. Strategic content that is equal parts crazy and inevitable. Takes strong opinions. Talks in simple, conversational language. Talks about the future 23 (82%)Total score: (/28) Talks strategically. Does not only communicate on a reactive basis. How each factor builds interest: In a social media era, it’s expected that all opinions can be condensed to 140 characters. The length of story is shorter than ever. But those messages must sit inside consistent long term narratives – otherwise the messages will come off as shallow, short term and un- coordinated. As humans we’re built to be interested in humans first. Whatever your job, role or company, humans are most interested in human stories. As a result, it’s important to communicate as a human first. Before you’re a CEO, you have to show that you’re a real person, just like your audience. Humans respond to stories that engage them on an emotional level. Communicators that highlight appropriate emotions will always outperform dry corporate communication. Talking with a full range of emotions doesn’t mean consistently “happy”, “sad” or “angry” – rather expressing emotions on the extreme end of the spectrum as appropriate. People have always communicated through stories, rather than repeating messages or sound bytes. Today’s stakeholders are suspicious of corporate messages that are increasingly dry and fail to capture the imagination. Communicating through stories ensures memorability and action. The most interesting thought leadership content balances equal parts crazy and inevitability. As a thought leader, you're speaking about ideas that are dramatically different to current "best practice". This means that there's always a risk that you'll be perceived as somewhat 'crazy’. You can mitigate this risk by positioning your ideas as the inevitable future - whether the reader/listener accepts this or not. All stakeholders have become increasingly suspicious of “corporate speak”. CEOs must communicate in simple and conversational language that builds a human connection and rapport with all their audience. Buzz words and corporate speak do nothing but drive disengagement. Today’s stakeholder is suspicious. To be a leader you must set direction for the future. Thought leadership is about moving beyond the reactionary day-to-day… instead focusing more on a long term agenda for the future. For the company, the industry and society as a whole. What we’re looking for: Consistently Regularly Occasionally Rarely 4 3 1 Source: Benchmarked on basis of publically available articles and reports. 13 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Very consistent messaging and narratives on the future of the industry. A core strength. Variable across platforms. Personal passions and interests come across strongly on Twitter. Rod is enthusiastic and excited when interviewed (and generally on Twitter). Emotions less evident in written posts. Rod only occasionally communicates through story – although it consistently feels like stories are sitting beneath the surface. Very strong - The financial web is a powerful example. Rod consistently makes good language choices. Simple, accessible and appropriate for audience. Regularly sets the agenda for the industry – and supports this with consistent messaging Assessment: 4 4 3 4 2 2 2 4
  14. 14. How Rod performs on the trust benchmark Shows appropriate vulnerability: Communication that shows appropriate vulnerability (failures, mistakes and shortcomings in the context of your current success). Individually relatable: Connected to society as a whole, not just the business: Has a clear purpose: Consistently communicates the same narrative over time: Source: Benchmarked on basis of publically available articles and reports. Consistent messaging, stories and narratives over the medium to long term. Does the audience feel like they know you as a person? Do they understand and empathise with your passions, wants and flaws? Do you talk with your audience or down to your audience? Discussing issues bigger than the business (whether industry, societal or personal). Strong and believable individual purpose. 15 (63%)Total score: (/24) Content that shows you're vulnerable strengthens your credibility and signals that you’re both genuine and honest. Both of these signals lead to trust. If you’re willing to share your failures, mistakes and shortcomings, it makes it easier for any audience to connect with you and trust what you’re saying. Consistency is critical for building trust. In the same way that we don’t trust people that we’ve just met, we don’t trust narratives that we’ve just heard. It takes time and repetition to build trust. This is established through consistently communicating the same narrative over an extended period of time. Whilst your messages and stories can change over time, these should stay inside a consistent overarching roadmap to build trust (this is your narrative). Trust is built on a foundation of individual likeability. We like people who we can easily relate to. Relatability can be easily measured by asking questions such as “Would you like to have a beer with this person? Or “Would you invite this person round for dinner?” Focusing on issues bigger than just the business helps stakeholder trust. It improves relatability by demonstrating alignment of interests - you’re motivated by the greater good (for employees, the industry, society). Talking about issues beyond the business makes it much easier for stakeholders to find points of agreement and alignment with you as the CEO. Many stakeholders are sceptical of CEOs as being excessively profit motivated. Having a clearly stated and believable purpose makes your motivation clear to all stakeholders. This purpose needs to be simple and a “higher calling” to be believable. If this purpose isn’t contextually coherent with the CEO and company’s actions, then it can appear duplicitous and damage trust (rather than improve it). How each factor builds trust:What we’re looking for: Consistently Regularly Occasionally Rarely 4 3 1 14 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Occasional - More opportunities to discuss past failures and speed bumps in the context of current success. Rod frequently connects to his narrative. The narrative is clear, compelling and a real strength for Rod relative to competitors. Variable across platforms. Consistent across Twitter and spoken word. Generally less accessible in written copy. Occasional mentions of country level topics and themes. Rod’s content is largely focused on product level themes. Rod consistently connects to his purpose of empowering small business. Assessment 4 4 2 2 2 3
  15. 15. How Rod performs on the visibility benchmark Is accessible across a range of platforms: Addresses multiple audiences: Has public views on corporate, industry and societal issues: Regularly quoted by third parties: The focus to date appears to be largely on the partner community. Easy opportunities to extend this to adjacent stakeholders. Regularly quoted in tier one and industry media. Strong accessibility across the suite of social platforms. Apart from Twitter, typically more focused on product level themes. 15 (58%) Search volume: (score /10) 3 Total score (/26) Rod has moderate visibility relative to comparables (see page 9) Presents your expertise across a broad range of issues. Shows custom understanding and perspectives related to the issues of each stakeholder group. Visibility is substantially driven by how others talk about you. We’re looking for evidence that you’re regularly treated as an authority in your space. In an increasingly fragmented media environment, consistent presence across multiple channels increases visibility and provides proof of authenticity. Stakeholders expect a CEO to communicate through a range of channels (not just press releases). For both visibility and trust the CEO must engage the full spectrum of corporate, industry and societal issues. Speaking across a broader range of issues increases the number of opportunities for you to appear, and for your audience to see you. Ultimately, the best predictor of future visibility is current visibility. The more visible you currently are, the more opportunities for future visibility will present themselves. How each factor builds visibility:Assessment: Source: Benchmarked on basis of publically available articles and reports. Consistently Regularly Occasionally Rarely 4 3 2 1 15 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Addressing a broad range of stakeholder groups including customers, employees, investors, NGOs and government. Regular quotes by third parties show that you’re providing interesting and relevant commentary on topics that media and influencers find interesting. Authentic communication across multiple channels of communication including press, owned media, events/conferences and social media. Communicates on across a full range of business, industry and societal issues. In this case we’re measuring current visibility relatively, through Google Trends search results. What we’re looking for: 4 2 4 2
  16. 16. 16 4. CEO and company narrative Identifying and strengthening your current narrative DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  17. 17. What is a CEO narrative (and why does it matter)? Difference Purpose FuturePast Narrative What’s the difference between messaging and narrative? Messaging •  Emphasises key messages that are used repetitively through all communications •  Messages tend to be rote delivered and have low ability to respond to context •  Can sound scripted Narrative •  Emphasises an underlying story that’s used repetitively through all communications •  A narrative is flexible and adapts to the context •  Easily remembered •  Sounds authentic Your individual narrative should build on the strengths and differentiators of the business. It must be intellectually aligned but individually unique and meaningful. 17 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Thought leadership and all CEO communication is grounded on a strong narrative. A narrative combines your past, future, difference and purpose into a short and compelling framework to guide all your communication.
  18. 18. Identifying ways to strengthen CEO narrative Past Key narrative questions: 1.  Where has the company come from? 2.  What was the problem the company set out to solve? 3.  How has your journey shaped you and the company today? Purpose Key narrative questions: 1.  Why is the CEO driven to make this company succeed? 2.  What is the company’s purpose? 3.  What values differentiate the company and its culture? 4.  What are your obsessions? Difference Key narrative questions 1.  How is Rod meaningfully different to other CEOs in the competitive set? 2.  What do customers uniquely love about the business? 3.  What opportunities are open to Rod and Xero as a result of the positioning of competitive set? Future Key narrative questions: 1.  Where is the company going in the future? 2.  What’s the publically stated direction of the company? 3.  What’s the world changing ambition or goal of the company? 4.  How is the unique future that Xero is creating meaningfully different from the competitive set? Key company and market commentary: “We are a global accounting platform and are committed to growth; and we have the cash and the management to do it” -The Australian, August 2015 “Connecting more than 50 million small businesses on Facebook Messenger with accountants and bookkeepers is a huge opportunity for our industry. We’re opening up access to accounting software, solutions and advisors to help millions of small businesses be more productive and get the advice they need to grow and create jobs” - Pymnts, Dec 2016 “No one else has put $300 million of capital to work for the last nine years to build that global accounting engine. I think our numbers, our continued growth, our execution ability across multiple geographies means that we will be one of, if not the winner, in the space over time” - Diginomica, Feb. 2016 “We made the decision to be really transparent about our numbers, and it has been fascinating that the incumbents, including MYOB, Sage, and Intuit deliberately hide their numbers” - ZDnet, August 2015 Key company and market commentary: “As a global leader in cloud accounting with more than 862,000 subscribers, we are forging a path to 1 million customers and $1 billion in revenue. Xero and its partner ecosystem has evolved to a global community supporting small businesses” -bizEDGE NZ, November 2016 “As we move from the back office to build front office applications, there is a massive opportunity for growth” -Fortune, December 2015 “Now we’ve got that transactional data cleaned up on a nice relational database — all nicely protected and shared — we can now start applying some of the big data and machine learning technologies to that massive transactional data set” -Diginomica, Feb. 2016 "We can see machine learning in our personal life and it is our job as software developers to really get this happening in our business lives as well. That's what our entire team is focused on because we think it is really the next wave and it's here now" -NBR, September 2016 Key company and market commentary: “It always upset me that big, financial software was so hard to actually extract information from, we began to see what was happening in the consumer web—that you could start to build these really neat, engaging web applications and not have to install software. Yet we weren’t seeing that innovation happen in small business. So to me, there was a very obvious opportunity” -Forbes, May 2014 “I wasn’t ready to start Xero at that time and parked the idea for a couple of years while I built and sold a successful email archiving startup, giving me the funds to do Xero properly. Running my own business and selling it reinforced how much traditional accounting software was so clunky. How could millions of small business owners be so poorly served?” -Xero, October 2016 “What we’ve been doing is taking boring accounting as it’s been done before and putting it into a cloud environment, which means you are getting the normal cloud benefits of no backups, any time, any device, and also the collaboration benefits. That’s just the inherent advantage of moving accounting into a cloud-type environment” -XU Magazine, Jan 2015 Key company and market commentary: “If you think what Facebook has done for people-to- people communications, enabling people to communicate globally, at Xero we are building a similar network where the add-ons and the network of bookkeepers and accountants all work together to help businesses” - The Australian, August 2015 “As we connect financial institutions… we believe there will be a myriad of opportunities to help grow small business including lending, insurance, factoring, currency services and much more” - Small Biz Trends, June 2016 “The vendor relationship is changing and it is no longer about software. It is about how we drive leads to you. We need to provide the playbooks and content which will help drive business to you. We are the number one lead source for customers and we are investing money in billboards, content and features” - Enterprise Times, Feb 2016 18 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Rod’s has a strong and well balanced CEO narrative, that’s told consistently. Regardless of your entry point, it’s easy to understand why Xero exists and how the company will succeed.
  19. 19. 19 5. Stakeholder review and prioritisation Identifying your key audience(s) DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  20. 20. What are the key audience groups for all CEO communication? The next page presents an audience prioritisation analysis for Rod Drury… There’s six broad audience groups that CEOs must engage through communication. The relevance and prioritisation of each audience group depends on both industry and company stage: 20 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION 1. Customers •  Targeting potential customers. Where sales are based on trust, it makes sense for the CEO to leverage a digital platform to build recognition in advance of physical sales activity. 2. Partners •  Engaging potential and current partners. Given partnerships are built on trust, it makes sense for the CEO to leverage a digital platform to reinforce build relationships/ dialogue and reinforce commitment to key partners 3. Recruiting •  Targeting potential and existing employees. Builds trust and alignment. •  Most relevant where there is a large recruiting requirement from a relatively small or unknown organisation. 4. Investor relations •  Targets existing and potential investors. Most relevant in public markets – however there is relevance ahead of fundraising events to build awareness and demonstrate traction. 5. Regulators •  Targets regulators and their stakeholders. •  Companies facing specific regulatory challenges. Whilst the end target is regulators, an approach here may focus on the general public or other stakeholders. 6. Industry influencers •  Targeting industry analysts and thought leaders. •  Designed to translate to recognition in ‘industry leader’ lists, speaking at conferences and front of mind recognition.
  21. 21. What are the key audience groups for Rod Drury and Xero? Industry influencers/analysts Regulators/GovernmentInvestors Employees Customers None/Low Some influence Many/most read Influence of influencers on customer behaviour? 0 5 10 Leading player Emerging player New entrant Current industry positioning? 5 10 15 Current investors - Total score: low priority 0-5 moderate priority 5-10 high priority 10-20 highest priority 20+ Low Medium High Risk of medium term changes in industry based regulations or requirements? 0 5 10 Insignificant/ Low Moderate Substantial Current impact of industry or company specific compliance/ regulation on profitability? 0 5 10 0-10 10-100 100+ Number of external investors? 0 5 10 Unlikely Possible Highly likely Additional capital requirement over next 24 months? 0 5 10 Below expectation At expectation Above expectation 0 5 10 Returns to current investors? Customers maintain multiple relationships with competitive set Strength of competition? 5 10 Recurring Project One-off Nature of customer relationship? 5 10 10 Customers maintain only one relationship with competitive set Next 12 months revenue growth goals? Channel Physical sales Inside sales Primary means of customer acquisition 5 10 10 B2C (Impulse) B2C (Complex/high value)B2B Product complexity / trust required 0 5 10 Digital 10 0-10% 10-30% 30-100% 3 5 10 100%+ 20 Size of organisation Low Moderate High Level of industry and organisational change 0 5 10 Extreme 20 0-30 30-100 100-500 0 2 5 500-1000 10 1000+ 20 0-3% 3-10% 10-30% Forecast employee growth over next 12 months? 0 3 10 Low Moderate High 0 5 10 Competitiveness in target talent markets? 30%+ 20 Current customers Potential customers Current Employees Potential employeesPotential investorsCurrent investors Low Moderate High 0 3 5 Current customers Potential customers Current employeesPotential employees Current investors Potential investors Highestpriority High priority Moderatepriority Low priority Employees Industry influencers Investors Regulators 21 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Partners Negligible Low Risk of partner churn? 0 5 Typical time to close? Non-exclusive Exclusive Nature of partner relationship? 0 10 0-3 months 3-12 months 12 months+ 3 5 10 Current partners Potential partners 0-20% 20-40% 40%+ Percentage of current revenue delivered through partners? 5 10 15 Moderate 10 Partners Current Partners Potential PartnersHighest priority High priority Moderate priority Low priority low priority moderate priority high priority highest priority 0-5 5-10 10-20 20+ Current customers – Total score: low priority moderate priority high priority highest priority 0-5 5-10 10-20 20+ Current customers – Total score: low priority moderate priority high priority highest priority 0-5 5-10 10-20 20+ Potential partners – Total score: low priority moderate priority high priority highest priority 0-5 5-10 10-20 20+ Current partners – Total score: Potential investors - Total score: low priority 0-5 moderate priority 5-10 high priority 10-20 highest priority 20+ Current employees - Total score: low priority 0-5 moderate priority 5-10 high priority 10-20 highest priority 20+ Potential employees - Total score: low priority 0-5 moderate priority 5-10 high priority 10-20 highest priority 20+ Industry influencers - Total score: low priority 0-5 moderate priority 5-10 high priority 10-20 highest priority 20+ Regulators - Total score: low priority 0-5 moderate priority 5-10 high priority 10-20 highest priority 20+ B2C (Impulse) B2B Product complexity / trust required 0 5 10 Liquidity of investment? B2C (Complex/high value)
  22. 22. 22 6. Theme/topic prioritisation Identifying the most important themes and topics to communicate to stakeholders DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  23. 23. What are the themes that CEOs should communicate on? Customer– Current Customer-Potential Partner– Current Partner– Potential Employee– Current Employee-Potential Investor– Current Investor-Potential Regulators/ Government Analyst/ Influencer Priority for Rod Drury High Highest High High Highest High High High Moderate High Proportional allocation for Rod Drury 10% 13% 10% 10% 13% 10% 10% 10% 6% 10% 1. Product/service level • 1A. Customer problems and benefits • 1B. Highlighting customer success / case studies • 1C. Key customer problems • 1D. Product direction / launching new product and services • 1E. Differences vs. competition • 1F. Differentiating beliefs 2. Company level • 2A. Financial results • 2B. Celebrating success • 2C. Working at company • 2D. Company culture • 2E. Purpose and vision 3. Industry level • 3A. Competitive landscape • 3B. Industry level challenges and opportunities • 3C. Industry level regulation and policy • 3D. Future of the industry 4. Society level • 4A. Company benefits to society • 4B. Economic trends • 4C. Public policy discussions • 4D. Personal views on societal issues • 4E. National and global issues Nearly all themes are relevant for multiple audience groups, for example: We can make a broad proportional communications audience allocation: Customer – Current Customer – Potential Partner - Current Partner - Potential Employee - Current Employee - Potential Investor - Current Investor - Potential Regulators Analyst/ influencer 1A. Customer problems and benefits Highest Moderate High Highest Highest Moderate Highest Moderate High Low Audiences and topics come together for a weighted topic allocation on the following page… Based on your audience prioritisation… There’s four broad theme groups that CEOs are expected to communicate across: 23 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  24. 24. Our recommended theme allocation for Rod Drury Customer - Current Customer - Potential Partner - Current Partner - Potential Employee - Current Employee - Potential Investor - Current Investor - Potential Regulators Analyst/ influencer Weighted proportional topic allocation Priority High Highest High High Highest High High High Moderate High Recommended allocation for Rod 10% 13% 10% 10% 13% 10% 10% 10% 6% 10% Product/service level 33% Customer/partner problems and benefits 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 1 3 5% Highlighting customer/partner success 4 4 4 4 3 1 2 2 1 4 5% Key customer/partner problems 4 4 4 4 3 1 2 2 1 3 5% Product direction / launching new products and services 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 1 4 6% Differences vs. competition 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 1 4 6% Differentiating beliefs 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 1 4 6% Company level 25% Financial results 2 2 2 2 4 1 4 4 2 4 4% Celebrating success 3 1 3 1 4 4 3 4 1 3 5% Working at company 1 1 1 1 4 4 3 4 1 2 4% Company culture 2 3 2 3 4 4 3 4 1 2 5% Purpose and vision 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 6% Industry level 22% Competitive landscape 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 6% Industry level challenges and opportunities 2 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 3 4 5% Industry level regulation and policy 3 2 3 2 2 2 4 3 4 4 5% Future of the industry 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 3 2 4 6% Society level 20% Company benefits to society 2 2 2 2 4 4 3 2 3 2 5% Economic trends 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 2 4% Public policy discussions 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 2 4 1 4% Personal views on societal issues 2 2 2 2 3 4 2 1 2 1 4% National and global issues 2 2 2 2 3 2 1 1 2 1 3% 24 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  25. 25. 25 7. Content style analysis and recommendations Reviewing the coherence of language, tone and style DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  26. 26. Content style recommendations for Rod Drury Idiocentric:Reader centric: Practical:Theoretical: Complex:Simple: Balanced:Opinionated: Primarily dedicated to discussing personal feelings and emotions. Inside out, rather than outside in. Characterised by more frequent use of “I”, “we”, “our” Focused on what the reader can take from the content. Outside in, rather than inside out. Characterised by more frequent use of “you”, “your” Arguments justified with theoretical rationale. Concepts rather than examples. Arguments justified with practical case studies and real examples. Easy to scan. Many subheadings. Easy to jump in and out of the article. Flowing article that is interdependent. Will struggle to get value without reading in depth. Will tend to be longer May take multiple readings to get full value. Strong opinions. Generally tells only one side of the story. Clear view about what is right and wrong. Sits on the fence. Tells both sides of the story. Like many founder/CEOs, Rod’s preference for thinking and reasoning from first principles can occasionally get in the way of the message. As a result, there are opportunities to incorporate more examples and stories to support Rod’s messaging. Content design R R R R C C C C R C Rod Drury– Current positioning Rod Drury– Recommended positioning 26 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  27. 27. Content style recommendations for Rod Drury Corporate:Personal: Formal:Conversational: Written on a personal level. Could be a conversation. Uses the simplest language choices to convey meaning. Uses deliberately sophisticated language. Will not always use the simplest language choice. Simple, descriptive language. Shorter sentences and paragraphs. Speaks like an old friend, assumes trust and agreement. Regular use of “you”, “your”. Longer sentences and consistent paragraphs. Theoretical, official and formal language. Doesn’t assume agreement on any points. Measured:Excited: Disciplined:Playful: Mature:Young: Enthusiastic, eager. Lots of energy. Speaks in an “off the cuff manner”. Regular and measured language. Thoughtful and planned language. Consistent. Restrained. Regular jokes, may be self-depreciating. Happy and friendly tone. Evident the author had fun writing the post. Controlled, consistent, habitual Unlikely to be self-depreciating Eager and enthusiastic language. Advanced, implies mastery Self-aggrandising :Self-deprecating: Regularly makes fun of self. Does not present as being on a pedestal. Only references to self are in a positive context. Difficult for the reader to empathise with. Rod’s language choices are generally well balanced – with a preference to simple conversational copy. One red flag is Rod’s language and tone can vary slightly from piece to piece. Combined with the lack of story-based personal evidence, readers may question whether written content is authentically Rod. Language Tone R R R R R R C C C C C C R C Rod Drury– Current positioning Rod Drury– Recommended positioning 27 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Rod’s written content can appear muted compared to his spoken word communications and social media. Allowing more personality and excitement to surface will improve engagement, authenticity and consistency.
  28. 28. 28 Summary, recommendations and next steps Bringing it all together DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  29. 29. Executive summary: Rod Drury and Xero 1. Rod is a strong communicator (but could benefit from more frequent storytelling) •  Drury’s authenticity, directness and strong opinions are a great platform for building interest and trust. Despite being a generally great communicator, there are opportunities for Rod to include more story based content. 2. The narrative is a key strength for both Rod and Xero •  Relative to competitors (and most other similar stage companies) the narrative is a competitive strength for Xero. •  Rod’s has a strong and well balanced CEO narrative, that’s told consistently. Regardless of your entry point, it’s easy to understand why Xero exists and how the company will succeed. 3. Most of Rod’s current communications target the partner community. There are opportunities to make this content more accessible to other stakeholders •  Similar to most growth-stage CEOs, there’s a reasonably large number of important stakeholder groups right now for Rod and Xero. •  Most of Rod’s current content appears targeted at the partner community. Small changes to make this content more accessible would open this up to a broader set of stakeholders. 4. More focus at the company and society level will improve reach and profile •  Most of Rod’s current content is focused at the product level. Based on the suggested audience prioritisation, we’d recommend that CEO communication from Rod should be allocated in the following themes/proportions: Product/service level 33%, Company level 25%, Industry level 22% and Society level 20%. 5. It’s important to allow more of Rod’s personality and excitement to surface in his written content •  Compared to his spoken word communications and social media, Rod’s written content can appear muted. Allowing more personality and excitement to surface will improve engagement, authenticity and consistency. 29 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  30. 30. Validation and leveraging this audit 4. Content plan (themes and topics) •  Building a detailed plan of content themes and topics to capture thought leadership •  Includes a medium term roadmap of content to be delivered (when and to who) 1. Audience prioritisation •  Reviewing which audience groups are the most important, and how they think about your business and CEO today •  Ensures clear prioritisation of the right messages for each audience and stakeholder group 2. Narrative and messaging strategy •  Building a strong narrative framework (past, future, difference, purpose) to anchor all communications •  A strong narrative aligns the way that stakeholders think about the business/CEO, and makes all communication more effective 5. Distribution strategy •  Plan for which channels / mediums should be used for which messages •  Timing and frequency of communications •  Concrete return analytics and measurement framework •  Key actions for increasing sharability of content 3. Content personality, voice and style •  Selecting the right style of content that speak to customers in a way that builds expertise and trust •  Assess tone, complexity and voice to ensure you’re building a long term, trusted relationship •  Includes a content design framework and benchmark to guide all content creation efforts The TLP approach to thought leadership strategy •  We use analytics, client interviews and a detailed workshop process to build a comprehensive thought leadership strategy •  Heavy focus on validation through customer and stakeholder interviews •  You receive a comprehensive 90 page report, designed for turnkey implementation and impact through our supported CEO blogging process •  Results delivered within 14 days Key components of any successful thought leadership strategy: This audit is a starting point for CEO thought leadership. Validation and planning are critical for success 30 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION 1. CEO communications audit 2. Thought leadership strategy 3. Supported CEO blogging ‘Build a comprehensive plan’ ‘Identify the problems’ ‘Implement and measure’
  31. 31. The roadmap from here 1. CEO communication audit (this document) 2. Thought leadership strategy 3. Supported CEO blogging ‘Build a comprehensive plan’ •  Get started with a comprehensive review and plan for success. •  Built on detailed stakeholder interviews, internal workshops and detailed analytics review. •  Findings presented in 90 page report with detailed analysis, review and implementation recommendations. ‘Implement and measure’ •  Put strategy into action with our thought leadership content creation service. •  Turnkey content delivery – we turn a one hour video interview into a month of content (five video supported articles), Saving you at least 24 hours of writing time each month. •  Options to build the presence of your CEO and other executives within your business. ‘Identify the opportunities’ •  This audit presents an introduction to CEO thought leadership strategy. •  We’ve conducted a desktop review of strengths, weaknesses and potential positioning for thought leadership. •  Includes individual communications performance and benchmarks against a group key competitors. 31 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  32. 32. 32 Appendix DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION
  33. 33. The press articles supporting this analysis 33 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION Ar#cle Title URL Individuals Organisa#ons 1 Xero completes two-year AWS migra6on project h:p://www.zdnet.com/ar6cle/xero-completes-two-year-aws-migra6on-project/ Duncan Ritchie 2 Xero hones in on regional NZ with new Hawke’s Bay office h:p://www.reseller.co.nz/ar6cle/610438/xero-returns-regional-roots-new-hawke-bay-office/ Craig Foss Wallace Development 3 Xero’s Faith Lands In Ar6ficial Intelligence h:p://www.pymnts.com/news/b2b-payments/2016/xero-ai-machine-learning-accountant-cloud-accoun6ng-sme-small-business/ Colin Timmis 4 How ar6ficial intelligence has morphed accountants into business advisors h:p://www.zdnet.com/ar6cle/how-ar6ficial-intelligence-has-morphed-accountants-into-business-advisors/ Ryan Tietjens The Commi:ee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) 5 Xero CEO Rod Drury tells: we're just fast movers h:p://www.afr.com/brand/rear-window/xero-ceo-rod-drury-tells-were-just-fast-movers-20161103-gshb3h 6 Xero takes home NZ interna6onal business award h:ps://bizedge.co.nz/story/xero-takes-home-nz-interna6onal-business-award/ Ross Buckley KPMG 7 Xero boss Rod Drury denies execu6ve turnover anything out of the ordinary h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/85910970/Xero-boss-Rod-Drury-denies-execu6ve-turnover-anything-out-of-the-ordinary Russ Fujioka, Andy Lark, Keri Gohman, Douglas Jeffries, Victoria Crone, Chris Ridd, Angus Norton 8 High-Profile — But Secre6ve — Funding For B2B FinTechs h:p://www.pymnts.com/news/b2b-payments/2016/b2b-venture-capital-fintech-startup-deloi:e-blockchain-santander-innoventures-tradeshil- investment-round-funding/ Rahul Khanna, John Dahlsen, Mariano Belinky Trifecta Capital, Deloi:e, Santander, Timelio, Thorney Investment Group, ANZ Bank, Tradeshil, Santander InnoVentures, SETL, Metro Bank, Tjaara, Senjō Group 9 How the cloud will impact SMBs next year h:p://www.bizreport.com/2016/12/how-the-cloud-will-impact-smbs-next-year.html Tamara Sco:, Interna6onal Data Corpora6on (IDC), TechnologyAdvice 10 The CEO of a £1.4 billion solware giant says blockchain won't succeed because the world is too 'tribal' h:p://www.businessinsider.com.au/xero-ceo-rob-drury-on-blockchain-2016-10?r=USandIR=T 11 Xero boss Rod Drury hos6ng new conference for company founders h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/85740377/Xero-boss-Rod-Drury-hos6ng-new-conference-for-company-founders Marie-Claire Andrews ShowGizmo 12 This Upstart Gives Intuit a Run for the Money in Cloud Accoun6ng h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/82669825/Live-chat-Xero-founder-and-NZ-tech-entrepreneur-Rod-Drury Peter Thiel, Chris6ne Dover Intuit, Accel Partners, Matrix Capital, IDC 13 Xero CEO Rod Drury says machine learning and AI at heart of its new products h:ps://www.nbr.co.nz/ar6cle/xero-ceo-rod-drury-says-machine-learning-and-ai-heart-its-new-products-b-194144 14 Xero will have a million customers within a year - Rod Drury h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/82240741/Xero-will-have-a-million-customers-within-a-year-Rod-Drury Andy Lark, Chris Liddell , Alex Mercer, Bill Veghte MYOB 15 How one Australian startup made it by doing everything backwards h:p://mashable.com/2016/09/12/xero-rod-drury-funding/#K6J2o3qPuiqS Claude Walker Accel, Motley Fool 16 Neulix is gevng Xero backing from Rod Drury h:p://www.smh.com.au/business/cbd/neulix-is-gevng-xero-backing-from-rod-drury-20160129-gmhgn8.html Tony Sage, John Kay, Harrison Young, David Mendelawitz,Peter Charlton Neulix, Perth Glory, Cauldron Energy, London School of Economics, Cleveland Mining Beijing Joseph and Co, Cape Lambert Resources 17 Global solware company Xero announces opening of office in Napier next year h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/86600915/Global-solware-company-Xero-announces-opening-of-office-in-Napier-next-year Murielle Baker Wallace Development 18 Xero sets its sights on being a $1 billion earner, shows 'pathway to profitability' - Drury h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/79835657/Xero-sets-its-sights-on-being-a-1-billion-earner-shows-pathway-to-profitability-Drury Chris Liddell 19 Startup War Story: Xero's Rod Drury's growing pains as a publicly listed start-up h:p://www.smh.com.au/business/startup-war-story-xeros-rod-drurys-growing-pains-as-a-publicly-listed-startup-20150824-gj64qj.html Peter Karpas 20 NZ looking good in a crazy world aler Brexit, says Xero boss Rod Drury h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/81658690/nz-looking-good-in-a-crazy-world-says-xero-boss-rod-drury Glenn Gore Amazon, Orion Health, eRoad 21 Xero’s AGM pops few surprises but the US remains a slow grind h:p://diginomica.com/2016/07/21/xeros-agm-pops-few-surprises-but-the-us-remains-a-slow-grind/ Uber, Neulix, WhatsApp 22 Movers and shakers: Rod Drury, Simon Pomeroy and Frances Valin6ne h:p://www.cio.co.nz/ar6cle/601221/movers-shakers-rod-drury-simon-pomeroy-frances-valin6ne/ Simon Pomeroy, Frances Valin6ne ,Salmon Khan of the Khan Academy, Satya Ni:a , David Braben,Demis Hassabis, Brendan Boughen, Grant Hopkins, David Flacks , Stuart McLean,Neil Reynard, Aaron Olphert, Wells Fargo, Fulcrum,Westpac, Mooola, IBM, The Raspberry Pi, DeepMind, The Mind Lab, Tech Futures Lab, NetApp New Zealand, Microsol, HP, Harmoney, eSpa6al, Kordia, 23 Xero provides big data tools for Kiwi small businesses h:p://www.cio.co.nz/ar6cle/597949/xero-provides-big-data-tools-kiwi-small-businesses/ Anna Curzon 24 Xero CEO on moving to Cloud 2 and leaving Intuit behind h:p://diginomica.com/2016/02/12/xero-ceo-on-moving-to-cloud-2-and-leaving-intuit-behind/ Amazon, Google, Microsol 25 Xero founder Rod Drury cashes in $20m of Xero shares h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/74448847/Xero-founder-Rod-Drury-cashes-in-20m-of-Xero-shares Craig Winkler, Sam Morgan, Blair Galpin 26 Xero to reach profitability in three years, First NZ Capital says h:ps://www.nbr.co.nz/ar6cle/xero-reach-profitability-three-years-first-nz-capital-says-b-189002 James Schofield First NZ 27 Xero leans on Amazon for machine learning and to crack China h:p://www.afr.com/technology/cloud-compu6ng/xero-leans-on-amazon-for-machine-learning-and-to-crack-china-20160219-gmz2x5 Clive Rabie , Tim Reed Amazon, Google, Microsol, Reckon, Atlassian, MYOB 28 Xero experiences glitch in move to new hos6ng provider h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/83431684/Xero-experiences-glitch-in-move-to-new-hos6ng-provider Alex Mercer, Adam Ferguson MYOB 29 Xero promises 50 'world-class jobs' in Wellington h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/83826944/xero-promises-worldclass-jobs-with-no-compromises 30 Why Xero migrated to AWS - and what it cost h:p://www.crn.com.au/news/why-xero-migrated-to-aws---and-what-it-cost-440667 Russ Fujioka, Keri Gohman 31 Xero Helps Startups Use Financial Transparency To Raise Capital h:p://www.forbes.com/sites/jlim/2016/08/25/xero-helps-startups-use-financial-transparency-to-raise-capital/#20cff4da888a Kenji Kuramoto Acuity, Buffer 32 Xero boss welcomes US 'refugees' h:p://www.nzherald.co.nz/hawkes-bay-today/news/ar6cle.cfm?c_id=1503462andobjec6d=11745904 Donald Trump 33 Xero has outgrown its own solware, Drury says h:ps://www.nbr.co.nz/opinion/xero-has-outgrown-its-own-solware-drury-says Netsuite 34 How Rod Drury Built Xero From A 'Small Set Of Rocks In The South Pacific' Into A Global Player h:p://www.forbes.com/sites/halgregersen/2014/05/28/how-rod-drury-built-xero-from-a-small-set-of-rocks-in-the-south-pacific-into-a-global-player/ #776bf1502f17 Hamish Edwards 35 How a global board allowed Xero to achieve rapid growth in new markets h:p://www.afr.com/brand/boss/rod-drurys-xero-board-right-people-right-6me-and-there-to-be-heeded-20160121-gmaz9h Bill Veghte, Craig Ellio:, Salesforce, Graham Smith, Craig Winkler, Chris Liddell, Sam Morgan, Lee Ha:on Hewle:-Packard, SurveyMonkey, Apple, MYOB, Trade Me, NAB 36 Xero's Rod Drury cri6cises MYOB prospectus as war of words escalates h:p://www.smh.com.au/business/banking-and-finance/xeros-rod-drury-cri6cises-myob-prospectus-as-war-of-words- escalates-20150401-1mclw3.html MYOB 37 Xero loses key execu6ve as chief product officer returns to US h:p://www.arnnet.com.au/ar6cle/597668/angus-norton-leaves-xero/ Angus Norton, Duncan Ritchie Microsol 38 Xero CEO Rod Dury says local investors don't understand tech companies h:p://www.smh.com.au/business/xero-ceo-rod-dury-says-local-investors-dont-understand-tech-companies-20150722-gihzlz.html Uber, Spo6fy, Airbnb, Neulix, Tesla, Apple, Facebook 39 Xero's US IPO pushed back but Australia's Atlassian gives heart h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/75364993/Xeros-US-IPO-pushed-back-but-Australias-Atlassian-gives-heart Reckon, Atlassian, 40 Xero CEO Rod Drury banks company's future on investments h:p://www.zdnet.com/ar6cle/xero-ceo-rod-drury-banks-companys-future-on-investments/ Chris Ridd Accel, KPMG, Google, Dropbox, Apple, Microsol, MYOB, BankLink , Sage,Intuit 41 Xero looks to next stage in cloud offering h:p://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/technology/xero-looks-to-next-stage-in-cloud-offering/news-story/8ed66cca436a35e827c1e1beb8453449 Dropbox, NAB, OzForex, Adobe and Bigcommerce, MYOB, Intuit, Sage 42 UPDATED: Xero outage resolved h:ps://www.nbr.co.nz/ar6cle/xero-goes-down-worldwide-185280 43 Xero grows to $1 Billion revenue h:ps://www.enterprise6mes.co.uk/2016/07/20/xero-grows-to-1-billion-revenue/ Chris Liddell Commonwealth Bank, Barclays, HSBC, NAB, Crunchboards, iZe:le, Expensify, Receipt Bank, Vend, Shopify, Paypal and Tsheets 44 Kiwi startup Xero went public without any sales -- here's how it grew to be worth $2.5 billion h:p://www.businessinsider.com.au/xero-ceo-rod-drury-profile-2015-3?r=USandIR=T Accel Partners, Matrix Capital, Valar Ventures, Intuit Quickbooks 45 Selling Your Business? Why Earn-Outs Are A Mistake h:p://www.forbes.com/sites/johnwarrillow/2016/08/10/rod-drury-why-earn-outs-are-a-mistake/#c99b23ff72c0 46 Xero rising at Xerocon London 2016 h:ps://www.enterprise6mes.co.uk/2016/02/10/xero-rising-at-xerocon-london-2016/ Gary Turner Sage, 47 Xero, Bo:omline Post Net Losses h:p://www.pymnts.com/news/b2b-payments/2016/xero-bo:omline-technologies-quarterly-yearly-half-year-earnings-results-losses-profits-financial- data/ 48 Xero and Wells Fargo Unlock Financial Web for Business h:ps://smallbiztrends.com/2016/06/financial-web-xero-wells-fargo.html Wells Fargo and Company 49 Only one in nine invoices from small businesses being paid on 6me says Xero h:p://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/78026874/Only-one-in-nine-invoices-from-small-businesses-being-paid-on-6me-says-Xero Anna Curzon Fonterra 50 3 Ways to Help Your Startup Survive h:ps://shil.newco.co/3-ways-to-help-your-startup-survive-1454e22ef6c4#.yma54blmo
  34. 34. About Thought Leadership Partners 34 DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION At TLP, we’re a specialist agency that builds thought leadership content for C-level executives. Watch a short video introduction, or read on below: https://youtu.be/hndoVYfuQdk We do this through first person videos and blogs, directed at customers, investors and employees. CEOs that we talk to generally recognise the rationale for thought leadership to: •  Build personal and brand authenticity and trust •  Engage key stakeholders in ongoing conversations •  Shape the industry agenda But at the same time, we hear from CEOs that they just don’t have the time to sit down and write a blog post. The 4-5 hours it takes to publish a high quality article is time that busy executives just don’t have. We’ve listened to this and built a video interview led process. Instead of writing, you sit down in front of a camera answering questions. We transcribe that content and a journalist reshapes it into first person content to be published (with video) under your name. How our process works: 1.  We do extensive preparation, on the right topics and articles for you to publish 2.  You’re interviewed on camera about these topics (your commitment is a one hour interview once a month) 3.  Our journalists build five topic focused, transcription driven blog posts out of the interview 4.  Because all content is built on your voice, there’s never ghost-writing issues with depth and credibility 5.  You publish five, 500-700 word articles highlighting your expertise with video highlights 6.  We deliver fortnightly analytics, optimising for engagement from the right stakeholders Over and above everything else, our clients love two things about what we do: •  How we genuinely understand the pressures and stakeholders of the C-suite. We know that every hour has an opportunity cost. We’re incredibly time efficient in producing authentic thought leadership content that drives the success of your business. •  We’re substantially more analytical and quantitative than any other player in the Comms/ IR / Marketing space. We bring this focus to strategy, campaign design and performance analysis.
  35. 35. +61 3 9111 5659 | www.thoughtleadershippartners.com | Level 17 / 31 Queen St, Melbourne DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION

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