Laporan kemajuan tugas belajar kelautan dan perikanan

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Laporan kemajuan tugas belajar kelautan dan perikanan

  1. 1. ACADEMIC REPORTING FORM September 2011 – September 20121. Name of Participation : Romi Novriadi2. N I P : 19811111 200502 1 0023. Name of Institution : Batam Mariculture Development Centre Balai Budidaya Laut Batam Directorate General of aquaculture Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Affairs Republic of Indonesia4. Program of Study : Master degree5. Degree objectives : Mater of Science in Aquaculture6. Name of University : Universiteit Gent7. Country : Belgium8. Number of Credit Hours : 60 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System)9. Requirements completed : 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System )10. Academic advisors name : 1. Prof. Dr. Patrick Sorgeloos Professor, Program Director Address : Faculty of Bioscience Engineering Department of Animal Production Laboratory of Aquaculture and Artemia Reference Center (ARC) - Ghent University Rozier 44, B-9000 Gent, Belgium Tel : +32-9-2643754; Fax : +32-9-2644193 E-mail : patrick.sorgeloos@ugent.be 2. Prof. Dr. ir. Peter Bossier Professor, Project Manager Address : Faculty of Bioscience Engineering Department of Animal Production Laboratory of Aquaculture and Artemia Reference Center (ARC) - Ghent University Rozier 44, B-9000 Gent, Belgium Tel : +32-9-2643759; Fax: +32-9-2644193 E-mail : peter.bossier@ugent.be11. Course completed in previous year First Semester Course Lecturer A B C D E Aquatic Ecology Prof. Colin Janssen 30.0 30.0 0 135 5 Biology of Aquatic Organisms Prof. Dominique Adriaens 30.0 15.0 0 120 4 Freshwater Fish Culture Dr. Nancy Nevejan 45.0 30.0 0 180 6 Techniques General Aspects of Prof. Patrick Sorgeloos 15.0 30.0 0 120 3 Aquaculture Microbial Ecology and Prof. Korneel Rabaey 30.0 15.0 0 120 4 Environmental Sanitation Technology of Fishery Prof. Frank Devlieghere 15.0 15.0 0 75 3 Products Applied Statistics Prof. Olivier Thas 15.0 45.0 0 125 5 875 30
  2. 2. Second semester Course Lecturer A B C D E Physiology of Aquatic Prof. Gudrun De Boeck 15.0 15.0 0 75 3 Organisms Algae Culture Prof. Peter Bossier 15.0 15.0 0 75 3 Aquatic Farm Management Prof. Peter Bossier 15.0 45.0 0 125 5 Training Aquaculture Nutrition Dr. Gilbert Van Stappen 3 Mollusc and Crustacean Dr. Nancy Nevejan 45.0 45.0 0 202 5 Culture Aquaculture and the Prof. Peter Bossier 45.0 15.0 0 150 5 Environment Marine Fish Larviculture Dr. Gilbert Van Stappen 45.0 30.0 0 180 6 807 3012. Course to be taken in upcoming semester Course Lecturer A B C D E Management in the Prof. Peter Bossier 45.0 15.0 0 150 5 Aquaculture Industry Aquaculture Genetics Prof. Peter Bossier 45.0 15.0 0 150 5 Diseases in Aquaculture Prof. Peter Bossier 45.0 15.0 0 150 5 Master Dissertation NN 0 0 300 900 3013. Acedemic advisor’s comments on Participants Progress .............................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................................14. Internship Work Tittle : Shrimp Post Larvae Sampling Campaign in Commercial Hatcheries Date : 9 of July – 20 of August 2012 Location : INVE Shrimp Culture research and Development Chonburi – Thailand Report : Attached Brief summary : Post larva sampling campaign in the commercial hatcheries gives a significant information about the best management practices in shrimp hatchery to produce the best quality of post larvae. Generally shrimp hatcheries in Thailand are a medium-scale backyard hatchery and honesty is the main key to success in this business. Positive respond shown by the shrimp farmer when we visit their hatchery and we discuss about the tricks that can be applied to solve the problem, especially the zoea syndrome in shrimp larvae production. The main obstacle in the discussion is the language, but this problem can be solved properly by the INVE SCRD staff. During internship, I also learned about the culture in Thailand, and how the communities in Thailand build a harmony among themselves.
  3. 3. Together with SCRD staff we also visit Kasetsart University Sriracha fisheries research station and discuss about the current technology in Aquaculture development.15. Thesis Work Tittle : Immune parameters (Toolbox for Artemia) The innate system of invertebrates recognizes the conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP’s), as for example lipopolysaccharides from bacteria and β-1,3- glucans from fungi, through a series of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), (Jiravanichpaisal et al., 2006). The innate immune system can be divided into humoral and cellular defense responses; humoral defenses consists out of production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), reactive intermediates of oxygen or nitrogen and complex enzymatic cascades that regulate clotting or melanization of the hemolymph (Beutler 2004). Cellular defense mechanisms are constituted out of several steps: first there is chemotaxis, or active migration of hemocytes; followed by opsonization, or secretion of soluble factors (AMPs) which act directly on the microbial membrane against a broad range of microorganisms (Bachère 2003; Beutler 2004; Donaghy et al., 2009), followed by phagocytosis (the internalization and degradation of foreign material) and ‘oxidative or respiratory burst’; during respiratory burst a rapid release of oxygen reactives occurs (superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide) and immune cells use NADPH oxidase to reduce O2 to oxygen free radicals and then H2O2. When overstimulation of the immune system occurs, there is a reduction in circulating hemocyte numbers leaving the host’s ability to deal with infection diminished (Bachère et al., 1995). Phenoloxidase (PO) is an oxidoreductase able to mount an early rapid response to a pathogen. The immune system is following up with slower processes such as cellular defense and synthesis of AMPs (Söderhäll & Cerenius, 1998). The prophenoloxidase activating cascade (proPO-system) also called the melanization cascade is situated in the hemocytes and is an important immune mechanism in crustaceans (Bachère et al., 1995; Cerenius et al., 2008). The conversion of prophenoloxidase to phenoloxidase is triggered by external cues such as immunostimulants leading to the assembly of cytotoxic products (i.e. quinine substances), melanin production and encapsulation of pathogens (Söderhall and Cerenius, 1998). Different quinone intermediates have different toxicity (Cerenius et al., 2008) and excessive production of quinone compounds is likely to result in toxicity and deleterious effects on the host tissue; therefore there is an elaborate system of activating factors and proteinase inhibitors to control proPO activation spatially and temporally (Cerenius et al., 2008). The immune system of crustaceans has been intensively studied and there is no reason to suspect that the basic functioning of the immune system in Artemia should be different. However at the level of gene expression not much is known yet for Artemia. There are 40.000 sequences available at public databases (i.e. the website of the European Bioinformatics Institute), however these sequences are frequently too short to annotate the gene function (they are generated on the basis of EST libraries) and hence are less successful in the development of a RT-PCR platform. Thanks to our collaboration with the Beijing Genomics Institute, a major sequencing effort will be launched for Artemia resulting in a larger coverage of the genome and hopefully even the complete sequenced genome of Artemia will be to our disposal for further research on homologue gene sequences. Based on the information available on genes in the innate immune system in other vertebrates and invertebrates, Artemia homologues can be identified and real time- PCR protocols can be developed. Although these protocols are necessary for testing on the mRNA level and to develop a platform together with producing new markers, verification of immune activity at the protein activation level is also needed. This can be done using a toolbox that is already commercially available. Enzyme activity can be tested via a DOPA test for phenoloxidase (PO) activity, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity can be detected using commercially existing kits. Gent, 12 September 2012 Signature of Academic Advisor
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