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Unlocking the Black Box - Of Engagement & Discretionary Behaviour

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Good management is critical to getting the best out of your team, but it's also important to understand how your management has a positive or negative impact on your team's motivation.

This webinar will teach you both how to get the best out of your people, and how to measure the work you're doing.
Proven people and performance management techniques
Practical real-life case-studies
Different management styles, and how to adopt them to different employees and situations
How to measure your team's engagement levels, and their levels of "discretionary effort"
How to understand what you're doing to better motivate your team

Published in: Technology
  • Daniel Wain was simple and straightforward. Know yourself better and help other discover their strengths. It's all about being flexible with your team. Most line managers are responsible for the high staff attrition rates in many companies worldwide and they hide a lot of things from senior supervisors and management. Thank you Qualtrics!
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Unlocking the Black Box - Of Engagement & Discretionary Behaviour

  1. 1. SM Unlocking the Black Box of Engagement & Discretionary Behaviour
  2. 2. 2 ©2015QUALTRICSLLC. Agenda 1. Introduction 2. Management tips & strategies 3. Using feedback surveys to measure success 4. Q & A
  3. 3. 3 ©2015QUALTRICSLLC. Daniel Wain Trainer | Conference Speaker | Actor | Playwright Daniel Wain Consulting Sarah Marrs Employee Engagement Expert Qualtrics Speakers
  4. 4. 24th March 2016 Daniel Wain Unlocking the Black Box of Engagement & Discretionary Behaviour How to get the best out of your people
  5. 5. ‘Employees may be our greatest liability, but people are our greatest opportunity’ ‘Increasingly, the success – indeed, the survival – of every business will depend on the performance of its knowledge workforce’ Peter Drucker
  6. 6. Managing individual performance helps achieve business strategy - it’s a commercial imperative not a ‘nice to have’ Business strategy Positive results for all Individual tasks Individual job roles Departmental objectives Specific goals
  7. 7. ‘Most research confirms that the quality of people management is a better predictor of performance than business strategy, research and development, or quality management’ CIPD Change Agenda on Human Capital, 2003
  8. 8. Purcell’s ‘People & Performance’ Model  For people to exert ‘discretionary behaviour’, they must have:  The ability to do so - the necessary knowledge & skills  The motivation to do the work & do it well  The opportunity to deploy their skills in the job & more broadly contribute to their work group & organisational success  The role of the line manager is crucial! John Purcell, for the CIPD, 2003
  9. 9. Unlocking Purcell’s Black Box… John Purcell, for the CIPD, 2003
  10. 10. Everyday Working Life
  11. 11. Little Things Can Mean a Lot…
  12. 12. What in the work environment makes your people want to do their best? Over how many of these factors do YOU have control or influence?
  13. 13. Influence where it matters Circle of Influence Circle of Concern From Stephen Covey
  14. 14. Circle of Concern All we worry about, but over which we have no control (e.g. the economy, world poverty) From Stephen Covey
  15. 15. Circle of Influence The more you focus on this, the larger it becomes All the things we can change, especially our own behaviour From Stephen Covey
  16. 16. Influence where it matters Circle of Influence Circle of Concern From Stephen Covey
  17. 17. ‘Leadership is influence. Nothing more. Nothing less’ Donald Maxwell
  18. 18. 20 A Manager is on stage every day - boost your armoury & be a role model
  19. 19. ‘Knowing others is intelligence. Knowing yourself is true wisdom. Mastering others is strength. Mastering yourself is true power’ Lao Tze
  20. 20. The Johari window ARENA FACADE UNKNOWN BLIND SPOT What others don’t know about me What others know about me What I know about myself What I don’t know about myself Joseph Luft & Harrington Ingham
  21. 21. Why should anyone be led by YOU? Rob Goffee & Gareth Jones, 2006
  22. 22. What are you / we aiming for? “Be yourself, just with more skill” Turning talent into performance There is no one recipe for this!
  23. 23. High Low HighLow Task Behaviour Relationship Behaviour Different Management Styles Participative Manager (Supporting) Delegative Manager (Delegating) Directive Manager (Telling) Consultative Manager (Selling / Coaching) Hersey & Blanchard’s ‘Situational Leadership’
  24. 24. One style does not fit all… ‘When the leader succeeds it will be because they have learned two basic lessons: people are complex and people are different’ W C H Prentice, HBR
  25. 25. There is more than one leadership style - be flexible... Use of authority by the leader Area of freedom for team members Tells - Sells - Consults - Involves - Delegates Leader decides and tells others Leader decides and sells to others Leader proposes & consults others Leader involves others in decision Leader delegates decision to others Tannenbaum & Schmidt
  26. 26. Know your ‘default’ style, then vary your shots... any model is only worth knowing if you act upon it!
  27. 27. ‘The test of leadership is not to put greatness into humanity, but to elicit it, for the greatness is there already’ John Buchan
  28. 28.  Agreeing expectations – “I know what I should be doing”  Feedback to improve performance – “I know where I need to get better”  Learning – “I know how to get better”  Career development – “I know how to achieve my potential”  Reviewing success – “I know what I’m good at”  Reviewing priorities – “I know what it’s important for me to focus on”  Staying on schedule – “I know what deadlines to work to”  Removing barriers – “I know what support I have”  Two way communication – “I know that managing my performance is also my responsibility”  Building relationships – “I know I am valued” Managing performance – common sense, yes… but common practice?
  29. 29. The dreaded appraisal… … is only so, if it’s the ‘be all & end all’!
  30. 30. Objective setting - Quite simply…  Where am I now?  Where am I going / where do I need to be?  How do I get there?  How will I know that I’ve arrived?  How can I see how far I’ve travelled?  Where could I go after that?  Do I have something to strive for?
  31. 31. What Design built What Customers wanted What Production manufactured What Marketing wanted What Finance budgeted for What R & D proposed The problem with fuzzy objectives
  32. 32. Measurable Achievable Timebound Specific Relevant
  33. 33. The importance of agreeing expectations Telepath wanted. You know where to apply
  34. 34. ‘Set me anything to do as a task, and it is inconceivable the desire I have to do something else’ George Bernard Shaw The trick is to delegate the right tasks, to the right people, at the right time, in the right way
  35. 35. Delegate. Don’t dump
  36. 36. ‘If you go on doing what you’ve always done, you’ll go on getting what you’ve always got. It’s a particular type of insanity that thinks you can get different results from the same skills & behaviours’ Albert Einstein
  37. 37.  A good manager:  Ensures feedback is specific, clear & timely  Uses it to reinforce good performance, as well as to correct not so good  Doesn’t ‘mix’ feedback  Tests any assumptions  Identifies the cause to agree a solution  Pro-actively seeks, as well as gives  Focuses on behaviour not personality Regular & ongoing feedback is crucial to effective performance management
  38. 38. Describe impact Pause Make suggestion Observe behaviours A simple feedback model
  39. 39. ‘The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place’ George Bernard Shaw
  40. 40. Empower by asking not telling…  “What’s the issue here?”  “What do you think the problems might be?”  “How would you do it?”  “What have you already tried?”  “Is there a better way to achieve our outcome?”  “What would it look like in an ideal world?”  “How will you know you’ve solved it?”  “What needs to happen to make it a reality?”  “How did it work out?”  “What would / could we / you do differently next time?”
  41. 41. ‘Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, teach him how to fish and you feed him for a lifetime’ Lao Tzu
  42. 42. If you forget everything else, remember…  Effective people management is essential to continued business success – it’s not a ‘nice to do’ but a commercial imperative  Little things mean a lot – make time for these to save more time fire-fighting later  Performance management has to be ongoing and continuous – it’s far more than the appraisal  There should be no surprises at the appraisal  The appraisal is about communication not paperwork  It’s their appraisal & performance – let them think, speak & record  Aim for a non-directive ‘coaching’ style – give people the space to grow & find their own solutions  Be aware of your default style & be flexible – aim for ‘best fit’ rather than ‘best practice’  Continually measure your effectiveness & seek feedback from your people – decrease the blind spot!
  43. 43. ‘If you leave us our money, our factories and our brands, and take away our people, the company will fail. But if you take away our money, our factories and our brands, and leave us our people, we can rebuild the whole thing in a decade’ Richard R Dupree, former CEO of P&G
  44. 44. SM Measuring and influencing employees behaviour
  45. 45. 47 ©2015QUALTRICSLLC. Different ways to measure discretionary behaviour EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT FEEDBACK measures how connected people feel to the organisation and their work and the company they work for, and, critically, how much effort they are prepared to put in as a result 360 FEEDBACK measures the frequency at which employees show individual behaviours and gives objective feedback
  46. 46. 48 ©2015QUALTRICSLLC. Measure discretionary behaviour EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT measures how connected people feel to the organisation and their work and the company they work for, and, critically, how much effort they are prepared to put in as a result PRIDE ADVOCACY INTENT TO STAY DISCRETIONARY EFFORT EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT I feel proud to work for this organisation I would recommend this organisation to family and friends as a place to work I see myself working at this organisation in 2 years time This organisation motivates me to go above and beyond in my role
  47. 47. Company practices / behaviours (Potential drivers of Engagement) ~40 questions An basic model for driving Employee Engagement Employee Engagement (Outcome) AUTONOMY /EMPOWERMENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES COLLABORATION COMMUNICATION COMPANY LEADERSHIP PAY & BENEFITS QUALITY PRODUCT/SERVIC ES RECOGNITION RESOURCES STRATEGY ALIGNMENT SUPPORTIVE MANAGEMENT TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT THE EXTENT TO WHICH AN INDIVIDUAL FEELS CONNECTED TO THE ORGANISATION, AND IS WILLING TO GO ABOVE AND BEYOND AS A RESULT PRIDE ADVOCACY INTENT TO STAY DISCRETIONARY EFFORT Step 1 – establish what is in your circle of influence EMPLOYEE MANAGER COMPANY LEADERSHIP
  48. 48. Company practices / behaviours (Potential drivers of Engagement) ~40 questions An basic model for driving Employee Engagement AUTONOMY /EMPOWERMENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES COLLABORATION COMMUNICATION COMPANY LEADERSHIP PAY & BENEFITS QUALITY PRODUCT/SERVIC ES RECOGNITION RESOURCES STRATEGY ALIGNMENT SUPPORTIVE MANAGEMENT TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT AUTONOMY / EMPOWERMENT 1. Decisions are made at the appropriate level in this company 2. My manager listens to or acts on my ideas 3. I am encouraged to come up with new ways of doing things in my role 4. I am given the opportunity to be involved in decisions that affect me CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 1. There are good opportunities for career progression at this company 2. My manager gives me the opportunity to try new things in my role which align with my career 3. I have an understanding of my career path at this company 4. I find my day-to-day work challenging and interesting Step 1 – establish what is in your circle of influence
  49. 49. Company practices / behaviours (Potential drivers of Engagement) ~40 questions An basic model for driving Employee Engagement AUTONOMY /EMPOWERMENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES COLLABORATION COMMUNICATION COMPANY LEADERSHIP PAY & BENEFITS QUALITY PRODUCT/SERVIC ES RECOGNITION RESOURCES STRATEGY ALIGNMENT SUPPORTIVE MANAGEMENT TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT Step 2 – use data analysis to tell you what affects Engagement EMPLOYEE COMPANY LEADERSHIP MANAGER MANAGER COMPANY LEADERSHIP MANAGE R
  50. 50. 15 questions to measure your impact on discretionary behaviour EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT 1. I feel proud to work for this organisation 2. I would recommend this organisation to family and friends as a place to work 3. I see myself working at this organisation in 2 years time 4. This organisation motivates me to go above and beyond in my role 1. My manager listens to or acts on my ideas (AUTONOMY & EMPOWERMENT) 2. My manager gives me the opportunity to try new things in my role which align with my career (CAREER PROGRESSION) 3. The workload is evenly distributed across my team (COLLABORATION) 4. I receive regular communication from my manager about what is happening at this company (COMMUNICATION) 5. My pay is linked to my performance (PAY AND BENEFITS) 6. People are recognised when they go above and beyond for customers on my team (QUALITY OF PRODUCT OR SERVICES) 7. I receive positive feedback from my manager when I do a good job (RECOGNITION) 8. My manager’s actions are consistent with their words – they practice what they preach (SUPPORTIVE MANAGEMENT) 9. Poor performance on my team is addressed (SUPPORTIVE MANAGEMENT) 10.My manager helps me understand my strengths and areas for development (SUPPORTIVE MANAGEMENT) 11.I have the training I need to be successful in my role (TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT)
  51. 51. Measuring behaviour on a 360 53 ©2015QUALTRICSLLC. MANAGER EMPLOYEE TEAM-MATES DIRECT REPORTS
  52. 52. Measuring behaviour on a 360 54 ©2015QUALTRICSLLC. OBJECTIVE FOCUSSED ON BEHAVIOURS CONSTRUCTIV E 360s force you into best practices
  53. 53. 55 ©2015QUALTRICSLLC. Daniel Wain Trainer | Conference Speaker | Actor | Playwright Daniel Wain Consulting dw@danielwain.com Sarah Marrs Employee Engagement Expert Qualtrics sarahm@qualtrics.com Q&A

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