DSO Pitch Deck

971 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
971
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
113
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

DSO Pitch Deck

  1. 1. Pitch Deck Development Solutions Organization Scaling pro-bono consulting services in the international development market Washington, DC January 2011Client Logo
  2. 2. Development Solutions Organization (DSO) provides consultingservices to international development clients through a studentapprenticeship program  DSO links students (undergraduate and graduate) and corporate professionals to form consulting teams that tackle client problems within the international development sector  DSO provides student participants with exposure to the consulting industry, insight into corporate partners, and opportunities for post-graduate employment  DSO provides professional participants with an opportunity to impact the development realm, a wealth of networking possibilities, and management/recruiting experience  DSO provides corporate partners with a pool of potential new hires, who have been tested and vetted during the course of DSO-sponsored client engagements 1
  3. 3. Table of Contents Engagement Model (1 slide) – Explains basic student/professional/client relationship Stakeholder Incentives (6 slides) – Explains why stakeholders are motivated to participate in DSO – This section is key to understanding why DSO will succeed and scale Plan, Status, Needs (3 slides) – Fall 2010 goals, roster of participants – Immediate needs: how you can help Appendix (15 slides) – More detailed analysis of DSO’s model and impact 2
  4. 4. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsIn our model, professionals gain additional leverage by managingstudents who actually do most of the work Set Expectations and Manage WorkProfessionals Clients StudentsContributor Accountability ScalabilityProfessionals High: directly responsible for deliverables Medium: provides career incentives (see following slides)Students High: connects high performers with prestigious jobs V. High: provides career incentives (see following slides) We combine the reliability of professionals with the scalability of students to maximize impact 3
  5. 5. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsDSO will source engagements from non-profits and socialentrepreneurs working in the international development market Students Clients  Receive high-quality services for free or very low cost ̶ Professional management ̶ Scalable labor from students Incentives  Forge bridges to the private, academic, and civil sector ̶ Learn about and apply cross-Professionals realm best practices ̶ Expose partnership opportunities DSO Cost:  Time spent talking with professionals Costs and Risks Risk:Corporations  Failed engagement ̶ We have placed much thought into mitigating and preventing this risk ̶ High bar for professionals and students: quality over quantity ̶ Professionals act as “buck-stops- here” quality control and manager Universities Professors Before: Students are plentiful and free but quality and consistency are a concern After: DSO finds the best and brightest; professionals provide institutional consistency and continuity 4
  6. 6. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsStudents compete for apprenticeships under professionals withdesirable corporate affiliation, experience, and connections Students Clients  Create impact in development realm  Form a tight and lasting network  Convert development passion into a Incentives career ̶ Work experience including portfolio-building deliverables ̶ References and referrals fromProfessionals clients and professionals ̶ Corporate partnerships provide explicit interview possibilities DSO Cost:  Large amount of time as an individual Costs and Risks contributor during an engagementCorporations ̶ Projects are semester-long; may receive course credit ̶ Apprenticeship length determined by the professional and student Risk:  Failure to deliver high-quality work may result in loss of benefits Universities Professors Before: Many opportunities to volunteer but few directly contribute to job search After: DSO provides a direct path from passion (volunteer work) to prestigious post-graduation job 5
  7. 7. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsProfessionals act as engagement leads and “hubs” that recruitstudents and other professionals Students Clients  Create increased impact  Gain leadership, management, recruiting, work experience  Potentially use DSO contacts to Incentives advance personal career  Network with like-minded professionals and professors, up-and-Professionals coming students DSO Costs:  Small amount of time as an Costs and Risks engagement lead to create theCorporations statement of work  Small amount of time as an engagement lead during an engagement  Small amount of time as a trusted mentor at all times Universities Professors Before: Many opportunities to volunteer but low ROI in terms of impact and day career After: Increased impact (leverage students), higher ROI on career (management experience, networking) 6
  8. 8. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsDSO acts as a boutique recruiting firm to corporations, offeringaccess to screened, trained, passionate students Students Clients  Better entry-level recruiting ̶ “Pre-release” access to portfolio of highly-qualified new graduates Incentives tailored to team/company needs ̶ More data points (referrals, recommendations, deliverables) to accurately judge a candidateProfessionals  Expose employees to management training and recruiting functions  Low-cost, high-benefit CSR DSO Costs:  Potential sponsorship or recruitment Costs and Risks fee to participateCorporations  Potentially allow key employees to volunteer on company time Universities Professors Before: Traditional recruiting has high rate of false positives and false negatives After: DSO decreases rate of error by providing multi-faceted insight into candidate abilities 7
  9. 9. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsMany universities realize apprenticeships are effective careerinstruments and will pay for a turn-key solution Students Clients  Provide students with relevant work experience opportunities  Provide students with learning Incentives opportunities inside and outside the classroom  Increase effectiveness of career centerProfessionals DSO Costs:  Potential sponsorship fee to Costs and Risks participateCorporations  Resources to assist DSO in communicating the apprenticeship opportunity to students & professors Universities Professors Before: Traditional career center caters mainly to “jumps-through-hoops” students After: DSO reaches “under radar” segment who also excel in their area of passion 8
  10. 10. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsProfessors convert their knowledge and research into concreteimpact by acting as executive advisors and influencers Students Clients  Help top students and advisees with career  Network with private and non-profit Incentives sector  Advance development agenda  Gain access to case practices in international developmentProfessionals DSO Costs:  Small amount of time as a mentor Costs and Risks  Small amount of time as anCorporations engagement key advisor (as needed) Universities Professors Before: Research does not reach field practitioners who could best utilize it After: DSO builds bridges between professors and NGO/student/corporate/entrepreneurial practitioners 9
  11. 11. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsDSO is currently finishing its pilot semester, encompassing3 clients, 13 students, 7 professionals, and 13 directors  Clients were sourced through , a leading network of social entrepreneurs – Engagements (1 paid) are expected to conclude at the end of the Spring semester – Functional areas are strategy/marketing, prototype creation (web app), usability analysis  Students were recruited during a weekend-long kick-off event at – 140 applicants were evaluated for cultural fit, entrepreneurial spirit, and clarity of thought – Selected students possess a broad range of skills (MBAs, HCI, engineers, policy) – Collective work experience includes  Professionals span a gamut of industries, skills, and years of work experience – Collective work experience includes  Recruiters from several corporations were engaged to gauge interest – In addition to accepted students, companies have also expressed interest in applicant pool – Recruiters from have committed funds or are in approval process 10
  12. 12. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives Needs Immediate Needs (in order of priority)  Core Contributors (Vice President)1 [~10-20 hrs/week] 2 – Manages at least one major part of DSO in addition to acting as a hub. – Example: Manage Carnegie Mellon relationships, kick-off event, student recruiting – Example: Manage all corporate relationships including professional recruiting and partnership strategy  Hubs (Principal) [~10-15 hrs/week] – Completely understands DSO and evangelizes to others – Recruits and manages one or more engagement leads; optionally, recruits students – May or may not act as engagement lead depending on number of ELs recruited  Engagement Leads (Associate) [~10 hrs/week] – Manages at least one client relationship and 1-3 students – If possible, recruits other engagement leads and (optionally) students  Strategic Advisors and Board of Directors – Includes professors, experienced non-profit leaders, accountants, lawyers, etc. – Board membership depends on expected level of effort1) Position titles and responsibilities will change after Fall 2010 pilot based on performance and future needs.2) All commitment estimates are estimates and may vary drastically based on skills, involvement, and network. 11
  13. 13. Engagement Stakeholder Plan, Status, Model Incentives NeedsIf you like this initiative you can support it or contribute by:  Volunteering as a core contributor, hub, engagement lead, strategic advisor, or director – If you are passionate about this idea, I am sure we can use you – See previous slide for role descriptions  Promoting DSO by telling potentially interested friends and acquaintances – Feel free to circulate this deck – We are looking to talk with professionals, students, and companies  Feedback is always appreciated Thank you! I am always happy to talk. Please contact me at: Edwin Shao <eshao@dsoglobal.org> 917.463.9978 12
  14. 14. Appendix DSO’s Innovative Approach Key Benefits Common Concerns Miscellanea – Positioning – Funding Model – Sample Engagement – Engagement Timeline 13
  15. 15. DSO’s Innovative ApproachDSO blends the best features of current volunteer brokering models The Professional-Driven Approach High Reliability The Student-Driven Approach High Scalability The DSO Approach High Reliability, High Scalability 14
  16. 16. The traditional pro-bono consulting model enables businessprofessional to donate their skills to help nonprofits Work on Consulting Engagement Professionals Clients TaprootContributor Accountability ScalabilityProfessionals High: take personal responsibility for all deliverables Low: depends on sense of altruism, low professional ROI The Taproot approach delivers reliable results, but suffers from low scalability. 15
  17. 17. Another successful model is student-driven and utilizesprofessionals as mentorsProfessionals Clients CCThis professional componentis optional: in some cases,the entire organization isstudent-driven. StudentsContributor Accountability ScalabilityProfessionals Low: not responsible for deliverables Low: depends on sense of altruism, low professional ROIStudents Low: schoolwork and career tend to come first High: this model has appeared on dozens of campuses The campusCATALYST (CC) approach is very popular but delivers unreliable results 16
  18. 18. In our model, professionals gain additional leverage by managingstudents who actually do most of the work Set Expectations and Manage WorkProfessionals Clients DSO StudentsContributor Accountability ScalabilityProfessionals High: directly responsible for deliverables Medium: provides career incentives (see following slides)Students High: connects high performers with prestigious jobs V. High: previous model scalability + additional incentives We combine the reliability of professionals with the scalability of students to maximize impact 17
  19. 19. Key BenefitsBenefits of this model are increasingly obvious when viewed from a stakeholder perspective Corporate Partnerships Academic Partnerships Stakeholder Analysis 18
  20. 20. We will attract top students by incentivizing outstanding work withrecruiting opportunities at prestigious corporations Professionals Clients DSO Corporations DSO-Corporate Partnerships  Corporations gain cream-of- crop students Compete for  DSO gains recruiting channel Apprenticeship to incentivize students  DSO potentially gains sponsorship grant or recruiting fee  DSO potentially gains access Students to additional professionals 19
  21. 21. We will work with professors and universities to reward coursecredit and source quality candidates DSO-University Partnerships Clients Universities increase effectiveness of career center DSO gains on-campus promotion channels DSO potentially gains sponsorship grant Universities DSO Corporations Compete for Apprenticeship Professors Students 20
  22. 22. Stakeholder AnalysisStakeholder Benefits CostsClients  Receive professional services – for free  Time spent talking with professionals  Transfer private and academic best practices to  Risk of failed engagement non-profit sectorProfessionals  Create increased impact  Small amount of time as an engagement lead to  Gain management, recruiting, work experience create the statement of work  Potentially use DSO contacts to advance  Small amount of time as an engagement lead during personal career an engagement  Network with like-minded professionals,  Small amount of time as a trusted mentor at all times professors, and up-and-coming studentsStudents  Create impact  Large amount of time as an individual contributor  Gain work experience during an engagement  Network with established professionals, like-  Failure to deliver high-quality work may result in loss minded students, and professors of benefits  Explicit path to convert development passion into career; helps focus career goalsCorporations  Gain cream-of-crop, trained entry level hires  Potential sponsorship or recruitment fee to participate  Employee participation in DSO is low-cost way to fulfill CSR while training employeesProfessors  Help top students and advisees with career  Small amount of time as a mentor  Network with private and non-profit sector  Advance development agendaUniversities  Increase effectiveness of career center  Potential sponsorship fee to participate 21
  23. 23. Summary of Relationships Professionals ClientsUniversities DSO Corporations Professors Students DSO is an organization that specializes in networking 22
  24. 24. Common Concerns Will enough professionals and students be interested? Will professionals have enough time? Will students have enough time? How is this different from an internship program? What is your revenue model? Why are you uniquely qualified to do this? 23
  25. 25. Miscellanea Positioning Funding Model Sample Engagement Engagement Timeline 24
  26. 26. Non-profit strategic consulting is a $1.5bn untapped opportunity The value of corporate involvement lies as much in expertise as it does in monetary support. – Bill Gates  High market demand but small and fragmented supply-side – Demand: 200,000 non-profits $1.5bn consulting services market – Supply: 3,000 providers $600m annual revenue Public Serving Direct Service Foundations Demand Segmentation • 1,000,000 organizations • 500,000 organizations • 54,000 organizations Large Business Boutique Consulting Solo Practitioners Volunteer Brokers Supply Segmentation Consulting Firms • Smallest segment, • Fragmentation • Largest segment • Fragmentation highest profile • Local or regional • 2,000+ providers • Local or regional • Only ~100 annual presence • $180m revenue presence engagements per  Large strategy firms possess tools and scale but  Consulting firms with non-profit experience lack lack sensitivity to the non-profit sector scale and strategic experienceStatistics from Taproot Foundation, Pro Bono Strategic Consulting: The $1.5 Billion Opportunity (2008) and Harvard Business School, The Bridgespan Group (2000) 25
  27. 27. Funding Model  In the beginning, costs will be extremely low due to volunteer-orientation – Travel, lodging, and meals for one kick-off weekend – All work will be done remotely with extensive use of tele/videoconferencing – For the Fall 2010 pilot, the kick-off weekend may be self-funded: we are working with CMU to fund or subsidize a portion of expenses  As the program expands, multiple channels of funding will be tapped – Foundational grants – Student recruitment headhunter’s fee – Annual corporate membership fee to formalize relationship and allow recruiting – Flexible client fee structure; retrospective “pay-for-value” donation – Corporate donations and sponsorship – Corporate networking events, entrance fee 26
  28. 28. Sample Engagement  Please see attached document: – Double click icon to open. 27
  29. 29. Example Engagement Timeline (1 Semester) Month .25 .5 1 2 3 4 Close Scope Statement of Work (SOW) Engagement Progress Provide Feedback Client Provide critical feedback Meet with leads to explain requirements Meet with leads to provide feedback on deliverables and meet with engagement lead to ensure project and schedule follow-on and negotiate SOW is on track work if desiredProfessional: Design SOW Project Management for Engagement Assess Project SuccessEngagement Produce project report Lead Coordinate with client and workstream Periodically meet with client to report on progress and ensure all workstreams are on right track based on feedback from leads to ensure successful SOW all stakeholdersProfessional: Provide Feedback on SOW Deliverable Management for Engagement Assess Student WorkWorkstream Work with engagement lead Work with students to Provide feedback to Lead to split work into discrete understand SOW and Manage workstream progress, reporting to engagement lead engagement lead on workstreams needed deliverables workstream quality Background Research Deliverable Creation for Engagement Close Out Work Students Work with workstream lead to determine Provide feedback to appropriate background research and Accomplish deliverables with periodic checkins with workstream lead leads on difficulties training to undertake encountered = General Role = Specific Responsibilities 28

×