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Thomas Allen
thomas.allen@oecd.org
www.oecd.org/swac/
West African Food Markets
and Transformations in Agriculture
GIZ, Bo...
A peopling region
2
Structural transformations
3Sources: e-Geopolis/Africapolis, 2013; SWAC/OECD 2015
The growing
role of markets
Markets, primary source of food supply
5
Markets provide
2/3 of food supplies
Size of the regional food economy
6
• West Africa food economy: 175 billion USD in 2010
– Total value traded on markets: 1...
The role of prices
7
Sources:WorldBank,ICP2011;SWAC/OECD2015
GDP per capita
ICPFoodpricelevelindex
Transformations
in Agriculture
Meeting demand
9
Marketed surplus - maize
Greater crop yields
11
• Gains in yield have been particularly marked since 2000
and now account for 40% of production gro...
12
Density and heterogeneity
Further down
the value chain
Development of post-harvest segments
14
• Food GDP = 36% of GDP
• Food GDP/Agriculture GDP* = 1.6
• Indicates major struct...
Importance of processed foods
15
• Processed foods (excluding cereals and beverages)
account for 39% of food consumption i...
Growth in food processing (Senegal)
16Source: UNIDO, INDSTAT 2013
0
400000000
800000000
1.2E+09
1.6E+09
2E+09
1970 1975 19...
• Markets play a crucial role in food security, both in
urban and rural areas
• Market dynamics are transforming agricultu...
• The regional West African food market offers
opportunities for value creation and diversification
Implications
Towards m...
- Africapolis (2008), Urbanisation Trends in West Africa 1950-
2020, AFD, coordinated by SEDET (CNRS/Université Paris
Dide...
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West African Food Markets and Transformations in Agriculture

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Presentation by Thomas Allen, Economist with the SWAC Secretariat, on the ongoing work of the SWAC/OECD on West Africa agrofood value chains in a region undergoing spectacular changes transforming its economy.
A video recording of his presentation held at the GIZ event on Global Agricultural Production and Consumption Trends: Implications for Development Cooperation can be found at: http://snip.ly/NHOG

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West African Food Markets and Transformations in Agriculture

  1. 1. Thomas Allen thomas.allen@oecd.org www.oecd.org/swac/ West African Food Markets and Transformations in Agriculture GIZ, Bonn 10 December 2015
  2. 2. A peopling region 2
  3. 3. Structural transformations 3Sources: e-Geopolis/Africapolis, 2013; SWAC/OECD 2015
  4. 4. The growing role of markets
  5. 5. Markets, primary source of food supply 5 Markets provide 2/3 of food supplies
  6. 6. Size of the regional food economy 6 • West Africa food economy: 175 billion USD in 2010 – Total value traded on markets: 120 billion USD • Urban spend 50% more than rural on food (per capita consumption) Sources: World Bank, GCD 2014; UNSD, 2015; SWAC/OECD 2015 53% 47%
  7. 7. The role of prices 7 Sources:WorldBank,ICP2011;SWAC/OECD2015 GDP per capita ICPFoodpricelevelindex
  8. 8. Transformations in Agriculture
  9. 9. Meeting demand 9
  10. 10. Marketed surplus - maize
  11. 11. Greater crop yields 11 • Gains in yield have been particularly marked since 2000 and now account for 40% of production growth
  12. 12. 12 Density and heterogeneity
  13. 13. Further down the value chain
  14. 14. Development of post-harvest segments 14 • Food GDP = 36% of GDP • Food GDP/Agriculture GDP* = 1.6 • Indicates major structural change in the food economy: 40% is no longer agriculture NB: *Agriculture GDP adjusted for exports Post-harvest segments of the agro-food value chain as important to food security as agriculture
  15. 15. Importance of processed foods 15 • Processed foods (excluding cereals and beverages) account for 39% of food consumption in 2010 Beverages Cereals* Food (excluding Cereals & Beverages) Unprocessed Processed All Lowest 4% 31% 29% 36% Low 5% 20% 32% 42% Middle 9% 13% 31% 48% Higher 12% 11% 28% 49% All 4% 27% 30% 39% Urban Lowest 4% 24% 35% 38% Low 6% 18% 33% 44% Middle 9% 13% 31% 47% Higher 12% 11% 28% 49% All 5% 20% 33% 41% Rural Lowest 3% 37% 25% 35% Low 5% 25% 31% 39% Middle 7% 14% 29% 50% Higher 12% 19% 30% 38% All 4% 34% 26% 36% Sources: World Bank, GCD 2014; SWAC/OECD 2015
  16. 16. Growth in food processing (Senegal) 16Source: UNIDO, INDSTAT 2013 0 400000000 800000000 1.2E+09 1.6E+09 2E+09 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Food, beverages and tobacco Manufacturing (ISIC D) Valueadded
  17. 17. • Markets play a crucial role in food security, both in urban and rural areas • Market dynamics are transforming agriculture towards more intensification, in particular around urban areas • Post-harvest segments of the agro-food value chains are fundamental to food security What is the potential of the regional food processing and marketing sectors? What are the opportunities and constraints? Key messages
  18. 18. • The regional West African food market offers opportunities for value creation and diversification Implications Towards market-orientated programmes • A more and more heterogeneous agricultural landscape resulting from differentiated spatial dynamics Towards targeted and spatially-aware programmes – soft and hard infrastructure, norms Towards integrated programmes – Actor coordination, access to credit, business climate • Development of downstream segments of food value chains to meet consumer demand for new products and services – Agricultural extension and training
  19. 19. - Africapolis (2008), Urbanisation Trends in West Africa 1950- 2020, AFD, coordinated by SEDET (CNRS/Université Paris Diderot). [OECD/SWAC-funded data update in 2014] - OECD/SWAC (2013), Settlement, Market and Food Security, West African Studies, OECD Publishing, Paris. - Soulé, B. G. and S. Gansari (2010), La dynamique des échanges régionaux des céréales en Afrique de l’Ouest, MSU, SRAI, working paper. - Youth Employment Network (2009), Private Sector Demand for Youth Labour in Ghana and Senegal, World Bank and ILO, Geneva, Switzerland. References

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