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Challenges of collection management: analysis staffing and space

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Academic libraries with collections of all sizes face limitations of space, staffing, budget, etc., but still must maintain their collections responsibly. Collection maintenance with the goal of reclaiming space requires both solid data analysis and staff to execute projects. Presenters with perspectives from three different institutions will discuss their experiences in facing the challenges of analyzing data and managing workflows for current and potential removal projects.

Speakers:

Lisa Adams, OCLC
Michael Hanson, Head of Library Technical Services, Sam Houston State University
Ali Larsen, Serials Librarian, Siena College
Melanie J. Church, MA, MLIS, Content Services Librarian, Rockhurst University

Published in: Education
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Challenges of collection management: analysis staffing and space

  1. 1. Challenges of Collection Management: Analysis, Staffing, & Space https://sched.co/MBN2
  2. 2. MANAGING THE UNKNOWN: PLANNING FOR THE UNCERTAIN FATE OF BOUND PERIODICALS Ali Larsen Siena College NASIG | June 7, 2019
  3. 3. THE SCENE
  4. 4. PRINT AT SIENA • About 200 current print subscriptions • Attempting to transition to electronic when possible • Done as money/opportunity/need presents itself • In 2017-2022 strategic plan • No additional money to help make this transition • Have consortial commitments to retain certain print holdings • We are still binding… • The footprint seems larger than it is.
  5. 5. CURRENT PERIODICALS FOOTPRINT
  6. 6. CURRENT PERIODICALS
  7. 7. BOUND PERIODICALS FOOTPRINT
  8. 8. The Setup • A librarian walks into a meeting…
  9. 9. WORD ON CAMPUS IS THAT: • No one uses print anymore • Everything is online • Everything is free • Space containing serials is being wasted Resulting in: • A lot of outside ideas on what the space is better suited for • Library playing defense
  10. 10. BE PREPARED…BUT FOR WHAT? • What did we actually have down there? • Holdings statement only, no reliable itemized number of physical volumes • Would we be forced to relocate them? To where? When? • Print to electronic conversion-not as simple as it appears • Some titles only in print still • Cost for current access and cost for back files • Our print collection is still growing! And is still being used! • For volumes that can be removed-ethical disposition desired • What does recycling mean? Can we repurpose?
  11. 11. STEPS TAKEN • Completed a bound periodicals inventory • Help from local high school transition program • Used final number to update insurance policy • Living spreadsheet • Helps us answer what if questions posed to us and ones we pose. • Re-assessing print • Flipster • Bindery evaluation • Conversations/quote from publishers for backfiles. • Space Master Planning Committee • Represented the library • An exercise in patience • Voiced issues/concerns-potential removal and relocation options • Actually made a difference and some progress!
  12. 12. MORE STEPS  Visually prepare the area  Circle stickers represent volumes that can be withdrawn  Color coded by backfile source
  13. 13. WHAT A DIFFERENCE AN AISLE MAKES
  14. 14. ATTEMPTING TO RE/UPCYCLE The Glowforge
  15. 15. ASK QUESTIONS AND LISTEN CAREFULLY • What do we want to see space used for? • What do students want to see? • White board questions coming • Part of a bigger library space discussion • We need to start playing offense!
  16. 16. The unknown path continues… but at least we are more prepared for whatever lies ahead. Thank you! Ali Larsen Serials Librarian alarsen@siena.edu
  17. 17. Challenges of Collection Management: Analysis, Staffing, & Space Presented by: Melanie Church NASIG Conference June 7, 2019 Keep the Work Flowing: Managing Student Assistants in Deselection Projects
  18. 18.  Small, Private University  Started with approximately 100,000 volumes  Modest previous projects  Consortium  Small staff
  19. 19. First steps  Inventory  Liaison data assessments  Meetings with faculty
  20. 20. Pathways  Faculty physically walk the stacks & choose items for review  Librarian prepares statistical list for faculty review & comment
  21. 21. Managing Student Assistants  Work Study, often Freshmen  May be the first job  Training  Routine
  22. 22. Student Site
  23. 23. Designing Documents for Projects For spreadsheets, include cells for: • Initials • Date For instructions: • Quick overview of why we need the data • What format we need the data in (eg. v.1:10-15 is different from entering volume 1, issues 10-15)
  24. 24. Thank You! Questions? Melanie Church Content Services Librarian melanie.church@rockhurst.edu
  25. 25. EMPLOYING DATA TO RIGHT-SIZE SAM HOUSTON STATE’S PRINT COLLECTION
  26. 26. THE SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY CONTEXT • State University • Texas State University System • 15K FTE/20K Head count • Doctorate and Master Institution • 1.4 million volumes • Faculty Librarian Subject Liaisons charged with managing subject areas of the collection
  27. 27. THE SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY RENOVATION AND SPACE REALLOCATION Space Stress • Building renovation beginning in February of 2020 • Currently little room for new print books • Library floors and foundation cannot support compact shelving • Changing user expectations of library space Collection Stress • Partially de-duped • Not weeded for 3 decades
  28. 28. CHALLENGES
  29. 29. PROVIDING USEFUL AND ACCURATE DATA • Subject Specific: Subject liaisons and faculty only want to see books that relate to their subjects. • Internal Value Indicators: Circulation, publication year, multiple copies/editions, representation of subject within collection, etc. • External Value Indicators: Uniqueness/rarity of material, holdings across peer institutions, holdings across all other libraries, CHOICE reviews, HathiTrust Public Domain, etc.
  30. 30. ADDRESSING REGULATIONS
  31. 31. MANAGING THE OUTFLOW OF BOOKS
  32. 32. GREENGLASS PROVIDED SOLUTIONS • Collated all the desired assessment data • Allowed for many users to concurrently examine parts of the collection • Accounted for local call number assignment • Produced datasets that we used for • Deselection • Accounting for regulations • Outflow of materials • Provided useful visualization of the data
  33. 33. What Is GreenGlass?
  34. 34. • Identify where the library has duplication between print books and e-books • Identify multiple editions of the same work—a form of duplication Many ways to use the data: • Find common materials that have never circulated • Locate unique or rare materials for preservation • Find pockets of subject strengths
  35. 35. • How many holdings/copies? • Where are they? • Is the title secure? • Can the title be accessed quickly? • Can the title be re-obtained if needed? • What options are available for each title? Good Data Improves Decisions
  36. 36. Library’s bib, item and transaction data for Monographs 1. 2. 3.
  37. 37. Same Edition: Holding set on same OCLC# • Better for widely-held, conservative for deselection Any Edition: Holding set on same or related OCLC# • Defined by OCLC Work Family • Better for scarcely held, minimizes false uniqueness OCLC Work ID#
  38. 38. GREENGLASS VISUALIZATIONS Bottom right box represents materials held by over 200 libraries and never circulated*
  39. 39. Example: Rare American History Titles
  40. 40. Example: Titles to Offsite Storage
  41. 41. HathiTrust
  42. 42. Comparator Libraries Choose comparator libraries or groups Groups can be existing consortia or ‘virtual’ groups Examples: • University of Florida; Penn State University • All academic libraries in NY, NJ, and PA • All ARL Libraries • Any handpicked group of libraries
  43. 43. Duplication
  44. 44. A Range of Options Compact Shelving Offsite Storage (Regular Stacks) Offsite Storage (High Density) Deselection • Preservation • Collection Discoveries • Digitization • Shared Print Archiving
  45. 45. CREATING REVIEW LISTS
  46. 46. REPORT PROCESSING: MAINTAINING AN INTERACTIVE, INVITING ENVIRONMENT OUTSIDE OF GREENGLASS Before:
  47. 47. FORMATTING: MAINTAINING AN INTERACTIVE, INVITING ENVIRONMENT OUTSIDE OF GREENGLASS After: Pre-Set Selections New Columns Shifted ColumnsConditional Formatting Frozen Panes Relabeled Sheet
  48. 48. COLLECTING SELECTIONS: DISCARDS
  49. 49. PROJECT RESULTS Since initiating the project in March 2018, the SHSU Library has: • Reviewed more than 90,000 books (15% of collection, 54% of books with zero uses, and with publication dates of 2008 or earlier) • Discarded and donated more than 22,000 books to Better World Books • Collaborated with 12 libraries within the TSUS system to donate over a hundred titles to participating libraries • Established workflow, which better positions the library to quickly adapt to evolving library space requirements as they arise

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