Shakespeare

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Shakespeare's influence on language

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  • Shakespeare

    1. 1. What has Shakespeare ever done for us?
    2. 2. What has Shakespeare ever done for us?
    3. 3. What has Shakespeare ever done for us? Or the Romans, for that matter?
    4. 4. Invent a new word.
    5. 5. Invent a new word. Decide what concept, idea, emotion or object is as yet unnamed in English and invent an etymologically sound word to identify it.
    6. 6. Invent a new word. Decide what concept, idea, emotion or object is as yet unnamed in English and invent an etymologically sound word to identify it. You have 5 minutes.
    7. 7. Try this. Explain what it is like to feel
    8. 8. Try this. Explain what it is like to feel LONELY
    9. 9. Try this. Explain what it is like to feel LONELY without using the word
    10. 10. Try this. Explain what it is like to feel LONELY without using the word LONELY
    11. 11. Thank you, Will...
    12. 12. Thank you, Will... For giving us the word ‘lonely’
    13. 13. Thank you, Will... For giving us the word ‘lonely’
    14. 14. Thank you, Will... For giving us the word ‘lonely’ ...with which to EXPRESS our MISERY.
    15. 15. Not impressed?
    16. 16. Not impressed? What about...
    17. 17. Not impressed? What about... ‘excellent’?
    18. 18. Not impressed? What about... ‘excellent’?
    19. 19. Or...
    20. 20. Or... ‘assassination’?
    21. 21. Or... ‘assassination’?
    22. 22. Or... ‘assassination’?
    23. 23. No?
    24. 24. No? What about...
    25. 25. No? What about... antipathy
    26. 26. No? What about... antipathy unveil
    27. 27. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical
    28. 28. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock
    29. 29. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog
    30. 30. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog zany
    31. 31. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog zany horrid
    32. 32. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog zany horrid hereditary
    33. 33. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog zany horrid hereditary well-read
    34. 34. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog zany horrid hereditary well-read untie
    35. 35. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog zany horrid hereditary well-read untie unhand
    36. 36. No? What about... antipathy unveil critical unlock leapfrog zany horrid hereditary well-read untie unhand unmask
    37. 37. And countless others.
    38. 38. And countless others. (Including ‘countless’)
    39. 39. Of course, he had his failures, too.
    40. 40. Of course, he had his failures, too. Like ‘unhappy’ as a verb
    41. 41. Of course, he had his failures, too. Like ‘unhappy’ as a verb ‘Toby unhappied Mr Ryan.
    42. 42. Of course, he had his failures, too. Like ‘unhappy’ as a verb ‘Toby unhappied Mr Ryan. Again.’
    43. 43. So, Shakespeare introduced a lot of words into English. (He didn’t necessarily invent the words, by the way...)
    44. 44. So, Shakespeare introduced a lot of words into English. (He didn’t necessarily invent the words, by the way...) As an example of how insanely innovative he was, plays like Macbeth, Hamlet and King Lear contain about one neologism every two-and-a-half lines.
    45. 45. He was good with phrasing, too
    46. 46. He was good with phrasing, too Hamlet: ‘Though I am native here and to the manner born, it is a custom more honoured in the breach than in the observance.’
    47. 47. He was good with phrasing, too Hamlet: ‘Though I am native here and to the manner born, it is a custom more honoured in the breach than in the observance.’ (Two in one sentence!)
    48. 48. Or...
    49. 49. Or... ‘vanish into thin air...’
    50. 50. Or... ‘vanish into thin air...’ ‘bag and baggage’
    51. 51. Or... ‘vanish into thin air...’ ‘bag and baggage’ ‘budge an inch’
    52. 52. Or... ‘vanish into thin air...’ ‘bag and baggage’ ‘budge an inch’ ‘be cruel to be kind’
    53. 53. Or... ‘vanish into thin air...’ ‘bag and baggage’ ‘budge an inch’ ‘be cruel to be kind’ ‘foregone conclusion’
    54. 54. Or... ‘vanish into thin air...’ ‘bag and baggage’ ‘budge an inch’ ‘be cruel to be kind’ ‘foregone conclusion’ ‘tower of strength’
    55. 55. If the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations is reliable, Shakespeare alone produced 10% of the most-quotable phrases in English.
    56. 56. Probably, and arguably, only the King James Bible (produced at the same time) has done more to shape and define the English Language
    57. 57. Along with the KJV Bible, Shakespeare did a lot to establish English as the ‘official’ language of England. Latin was dominant in official spheres up until that time.
    58. 58. So, without Will, you would no doubt be spending ten hours a day at school mastering Latin, just like he had to.
    59. 59. So, without Will, you would no doubt be spending ten hours a day at school mastering Latin, just like he had to.
    60. 60. Plagiarised shamelessly (in best Shakespearean tradition) from Bill Bryson’s ‘Shakespeare.’
    61. 61. Plagiarised shamelessly (in best Shakespearean tradition) from Bill Bryson’s ‘Shakespeare.’

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