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UWA Research Week 2016

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UWA Research Week 2016

  1. 1. Research Data Management Services Katina Toufexis Research Data Coordinator eResearch Support Unit University Library katina.toufexis@uwa.edu.au 6488 5319
  2. 2. Supporting Data @ UWA www.library.uwa.edu.au/r esearch/services
  3. 3. Before you begin, have you considered everything?
  4. 4. Your Research Outputs
  5. 5. Why should I care?
  6. 6. Consistency & Efficiency
  7. 7. Working solo…
  8. 8. When should I think about Research Data Management? Research Lifecycle – incorporating research data management
  9. 9. Supporting Data @ UWA www.library.uwa.edu.au/r esearch/services
  10. 10. Creating a Research Data Management Plan The Data Management Plan is: • an online form • uses the Qualtrics survey platform • Asks relevant questions pertaining to your research data • Sends you an electronic plan directly to your email after completion
  11. 11. The ARC and the NHMRC care about your research data. Funders
  12. 12. Funders The ARC and the NHMRC care about your research data. Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (NHMRC, ARC and Universities Australia 2007)
  13. 13. Funders The ARC and the NHMRC care about your research data. Discovery Projects Instructions to Applicants from 2015 requires a data management statement
  14. 14. Funders The ARC and the NHMRC care about your research data. ARC 2015 Funding Rules: Follow the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (2007). STRONGLY ENCOURAGE data to be publicly accessible.
  15. 15. Funders The ARC and the NHMRC care about your research data. 2015 Data Sharing Statement: “NHMRC encourages data sharing and providing access to data and other research outputs (metadata, analysis code, study protocols, study materials and other collected data) arising from NHMRC supported research”
  16. 16. Publishers Many publishers are requiring that the data behind your published findings are PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE in an institutional data repository.
  17. 17. Publishers Many publishers are requiring that the data behind your published findings are PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE in an institutional data repository. PLOS, BMJ, dcite and about 100 more
  18. 18. Publishers Many publishers are requiring that the data behind your published findings are PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE in an institutional data repository. Via data availability statements
  19. 19. Publishers Many publishers are requiring that the data behind your published findings are PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE in an institutional data repository. Tables, raw data, images etc.
  20. 20. Publishers Many publishers are requiring that the data behind your published findings are PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE in an institutional data repository. You must provide a link – preferably a DOI – to the reviewers Anyone should be able to access that dataset at any time, without restriction
  21. 21. Publishers
  22. 22. Publishers 1. Data associated with the paper to be submitted to their own repositories, or 2. Data associated with the paper the be submitted to ‘appropriate repositories’
  23. 23. DATA Journals Data journals allow researchers to formally publish, and gain acknowledgement for, their research data outputs.
  24. 24. DATA Journals Data journals allow researchers to formally publish, and gain acknowledgement for, their research data outputs. Wiley’s Geoscience Data Journal Nature’s Scientific Data Ubiquity’s Journal of Open Archaeology Data
  25. 25. DATA Journals Data journals allow researchers to formally publish, and gain acknowledgement for, their research data outputs. citation metrics for research data outputs
  26. 26. The Data Deluge – Should I share? “Data is more like soup – it’s messy and you don’t know what’s in it.” – Liz Lyon (UK DCC) “I worry there won't be enough people around to do the analysis.” –Chris Ponting (University of Oxford UK, Computational biologist) “A single DNA sequencer can now generate in a day what it took 10 years to collect for the Human Genome Project. Computers are central to archiving and analysing this information, but their processing power isn’t increasing fast enough, and their costs are decreasing too slowly, to keep up with the deluge.” - Elizabeth Pennisi (Science Author)
  27. 27. Supporting Data @ UWA www.library.uwa.edu.au/r esearch/services
  28. 28. Research Data Online (RDO) • Publicly accessible • Discoverable • Harvested into RDA • DOIs OR Locally generated handles
  29. 29. Research Data Online (RDO) RDO (UWA) RDA (ANDS)
  30. 30. METADATA is a LOVE NOTE to the FUTURE
  31. 31. Article in Nature
  32. 32. Restricted Access? Public Access?
  33. 33. In Australia… no license is regarded as the same as 'all rights reserved'
  34. 34. AUSGOAL Licences Licensing your data http://www.ausgoal.gov.au/ creative-commons-v4.0
  35. 35. Licence Chooser Tool Licensing your data http://www.ausgoal.gov.au/licence-chooser Licence Chooser Tool http://creativecommons.org/choose/
  36. 36. The compendium of crop Proteins with Annotated Locations (cropPAL) version 1 Dr Cornelia Hooper Appearing in UWA’s Research Data Online (RDO)
  37. 37. The compendium of crop Proteins with Annotated Locations (cropPAL) version 1 Dr Cornelia Hooper
  38. 38. The compendium of crop Proteins with Annotated Locations (cropPAL) version 1 Dr Cornelia Hooper
  39. 39. The compendium of crop Proteins with Annotated Locations (cropPAL) version 1 Dr Cornelia Hooper Appears in Research Data Australia (RDA)
  40. 40. The compendium of crop Proteins with Annotated Locations (cropPAL) version 1 Dr Cornelia Hooper Appears in Research Data Australia (RDA)
  41. 41. Your legacy
  42. 42. Supporting Data @ UWA www.library.uwa.edu.au/ research/services
  43. 43. IRDS – Data Storage at UWA
  44. 44. Case Study Dropbox? HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response Technically, yes, but should you? • Contracts/Agreements with data providers? • Seek advice from Legal Services • No charge for < 2GB ; but >2GB=$$ • Allows access to collaborators. • Confidential data may not be safe. The data is being stored overseas. • Not managed, maintained or stored by UWA.
  45. 45. Case Study HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response Make informed decisions • UWA’s Information Governance Services (IGS) provide guidance on using public cloud storage. – http://www.igs.uwa.edu.au/p olicies/guides/auth/cloud- storage Dropbox?
  46. 46. Case Study HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response Make informed decisions • University Policy on: Institutional Data Centre • University Policy on: Records Management • Computer and Software Use Regulations • University Policy on: Records Management • UWA Code of Conduct for the Responsible Practice of Research • UWA Recordkeeping Plan • Western Australian University Sector Disposal Authority • Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research • University’s Policy on Privacy of Electronic Material Dropbox?
  47. 47. Case Study HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response IRDS would be an excellent choice • Data is stored locally. • The IRDS maintained and supported by UWA (Service Desk Support 24/7) • Encouraged for long-term storage and can be used to comply with WAUSDA. – “Research records must be retained for a minimum of 7 years after the date of publication or project completion, whichever is later.” Dropbox?
  48. 48. Case Study IRDS vs Dropbox HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response IRDS would be an excellent choice • Allows for external collaborator access – Pheme authentication provided to external collaborators via http://www.hr.uwa.edu.au/__ data/assets/pdf_file/0006/21 72606/Commencement_of_ Non-university_Staff.pdf
  49. 49. Case Study IRDS vs Dropbox HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response IRDS would be an excellent choice
  50. 50. Case Study UniDrive vs Dropbox HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response BITS are about to launch the UniDrive Client for: • Windows laptops • Off-campus desktops 1. Staff and students will access H; drive and IRDS shares 2. Staff will also access UNIWA S: drive
  51. 51. Case Study HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response BITS are about to launch the UniDrive Client for: • Windows laptops • Off-campus desktops 3. Similar functionality to DropBox without the risk 4. Persistent connection 5. Offline Connections 6. Will appear in Windows Explorer UniDrive vs Dropbox
  52. 52. Case Study PAWSEY vs Dropbox HDR student query Can I use Dropbox to transfer confidential data from international companies for my research at UWA? • Confidentiality? • Is encryption ok? • Other cloud storage options? Our response Pawsey Supercomputing could be an option • Can cope with large (‘Big Data’) datasets and file transfer. • Allows access to collaborators. • Not encouraged for long-term storage (dependent on funding). • Not managed or maintained by UWA.
  53. 53. NeCTAR Research Cloud Suitable for long-running small simulations (e.g. R, Python) • Project Trial allocation is 2 cores for 3 months • Instances can have up to 16 cores, 64GB memory (via National allocation). • Can start with Linux image from scratch and install software on it, or access virtual laboratories and tools where available.
  54. 54. Data storage • Online application process (data >5TB*) [*some exceptions] • Designed for collaboration, not for ‘primary’ copy of data • Access is governed by the Data Storage and Management Policy (DSMP) • Access to Pawsey data stores is provided by the LiveARC storage management framework (also known as Mediaflux) • Command line and web-interface access
  55. 55. https://data.pawsey.org.au Data storage
  56. 56. Data storage https://data.pawsey.org.au
  57. 57. Further information https://support.pawsey.org.au/documentation click on ‘Data’
  58. 58. AARNet+ CloudStor
  59. 59. Your Toolkit
  60. 60. Research Data Management Toolkit UWA Site Search for the Toolkit
  61. 61. Contacts Questions? Katina Toufexis Research Data Coordinator katina.toufexis@uwa.edu.au 6488 5319 Senior Librarian for your Faculty http://www.library.uwa.edu.au/contact/senior-librarians

Editor's Notes

  • The University Library provides a range of services to help researchers manage their research data to reap the benefits (as will be described) and to meet funder and publisher requirements
    I will go through each of these services (planning, storage and sharing options in the next 45 minutes.
  • You’re applying for your grant.
    You’ve got your checklist
    But have you ever considered your research data?
  • The Northern Party at the South Magnetic Pole. Photographer Douglas Mawson 1909. Courtesy Mawson Collection South Australian Museum

    “It is not possible to apply a uniform definition of research data across all disciplines. Research data may be numerical, textual, audio-visual, digital or physical, depending on the discipline and the nature of the research.”

  • You should care because if you’re organised, you can them comply with Funder, publisher, institutional policies and follow recent government announcements and initiatives.
  • If you’re working in a team this is imperative for reasons such as consistency and efficiency

    Of course this applies to solo researchers….
  • If you’re working solo, having a data management plan keeps you organised
    You need to think about how what you’re going to do with your data.
  • Research data management covers all phases of the research lifecycle. Protocols that relate to ownership, documentation, security, sharing and disposal of research data must be implemented throughout each stage of the research process. Research data can continue to be used, reviewed and modified via follow-up projects beyond the scope of the original research project.
    A Research Data Management Plan can help researchers document every stage of the research data lifecycle.

    This diagram was developed by the eResearch Support team to demonstrate Where RDM Planning fits within the Research Lifecycle.

    It shows the steps in the research life cycle.

    Step 1 – where the researcher has the initial concept
    Step 2 – is planning for the entire project
    Step 3 – is where the researchers create their grant/project proposal
    Step 4 – start their project
    Step 5 – data collection
    Step 6 – Conclusion of the project
    Step 7 – Reporting & publication
  • In our services page there is access to a DATA MGT PLANNING TOOL
  • The Data Management Planning Tool is:

    an online form

    uses the Qualtrics survey platform

    Asks relevant questions pertaining to your research data

    Sends you an electronic plan directly to your email after completion.

    Our toolkit features a template RDM plan which you can download or complete via an online form.
    The plan is a guide and at the very least a useful checklist of issues to consider.
    While its not compulsory there’s certainly significant interest and University level and in some faculties and Schools in standardising or getting a more consistent approach to research data planning.


  • Funders such as the ARC and NHMRC care about your data.
    How you manage it during and after the project
    And
    Whether or not your share it in the future.
  • You may be familiar with the Code;
    It was jointly developed by the ARC, NHMC and Universities Australia

    In order to receive NHMRC funding, researchers must comply with the code.

    What is the code?
    Provides guidelines for institutions and researchers;
    Promotes best practices in responsible research; and
    Promotes research integrity;

    Section 1: covers General principles of responsible research
    Section 2: covers the Management of research data and primary materials



  • Researchers are now required as part of the application process for National Competitive Grants Program funding to outline how they plan to manage research data arising from ARC-funded research. 


  • A11.5 Publication and Dissemination of Research Outputs

    A11.5.2 Researchers and institutions have an obligation to care for and maintain research data in accordance with the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (2007).
    The ARC considers data management planning an important part of the responsible conduct of research and strongly encourages the depositing of data arising from a Project in an appropriate publically accessible subject and/or institutional repository.
  • One of NHMRC’s primary roles is to fund high quality health and medical research and ensure that the Australian community receives the health and economic benefits from that investment. An important part of this responsibility includes enabling researchers and members of the community to access the outputs of research.
    NHMRC acknowledges the importance of making data publicly accessible.
    NHMRC encourages data sharing and providing access to data and other research outputs (metadata, analysis code, study protocols, study materials and other collected data) arising from NHMRC supported research.
    This aligns with researchers’ responsibilities under the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (2007)

    The NHMRC also provides advice as to how to share research data

    NHMRC encourages researchers to disseminate and share their research data through publicly accessible databases or repositories. However, NHMRC understands that the level of detail in which data could be shared may be limited by a wide range of factors (e.g. ethics (particularly consent), legal, IP).
    In addition to ethical-legal limitations, other limitations may also exist (e.g. data format and standards, variable ontologies used to describe data).
    Researchers are therefore encouraged to share data with as much breadth and depth as possible, while taking into account their ethical-legal obligations, and providing sufficient metadata to allow others to reuse their data.
  • In general, journals require one of two things.

    Data associated with the paper to be submitted to their own repositories, or

    Data associated with the paper the be submitted to ‘appropriate repositories’

    Here raises the question as to whether or not we want Journals to dictate where we/researchers submit our data.
  • Data Journals

    A new form of data publishing.

    Data journals focus on the data itself, rather than discussion and analysis of the data (as in traditional journals).

    Data journals give an opportunity for researchers and data producers to formally publish, and gain acknowledgement for, their research data outputs.


    What are data journals?
    Data journals are publications whose primary purpose is to expose datasets by providing the infrastructure and scholarly reward opportunities that will encourage researchers, funders and data centre managers to share research data outputs.
    Data journals have evolved from the more traditional journal model, that describe datasets including supplemental material that links to datasets. Data journals have more in common with those journals that publish articles or overlay papers that describe data, but take the concept a few steps further. Fundamentally, data journals seek to promote scientific accreditation and re-use, improve transparency of scientific method and results, support good data management practices and provide an accessible, permanent and resolvable route to the dataset.

    Why data journals?
    As the primary purpose of data journals is to expose and share research data, this form of publishing may be of interest to researchers and data producers for whom data is a primary research output. It enables the author (or data producer) to focus on describing the data itself, rather than producing an extensive analysis of the data. In some cases, the publication cycle may be quicker than traditional journals, and where there is a requirement to deposit data in an "approved repository", long term curation and access to the data is assured.
    Publishing a data paper may be regarded as best practice in data management as it:
    includes an element of peer review of the dataset
    maximises opportunities for reuse of the dataset
    provides academic accreditation for data scientists as well as front-line researchers.
    While individual publisher policies vary, it's worth noting that publishing data through a data journal does not necessarily prevent the publication of data analyses and research results in a traditional journal - along with a reference and links to the data journal paper. This provides readers with access to all relevant information about a piece of research and may result in citation of both the journal article and data paper.

  • Examples of data journals include:
    Geoscience Data Journal - published by Wiley and established in 2012
    Scientific Data - published by Nature and established in 2013
    Journal of Open Archaeology Data - published by Ubiquity and established in 2011
    Biodiversity Data Journal – published by Pensoft and established in 2013.

    Important to note that although these journals don’t claim ownership on any of the datasets, there are implications when journals start to dictate where researchers can put their datasets.

    We are entering new territory as librarians.

    We need to improve our systems as well as policies to ensure that we are ready to meet any future Funder Mandates…


    Scientific Data

    Lists institutional repositories (such as our RDO) as ‘appropriate’ so long as the repository can mint a DataCite DOI.

    Journal of Open Archaeology Data and
    Geoscience Data Journal

    Don’t list institutional repositories as ‘appropriate’.
    They need to consult the editor for permission.
  • Data citation
    Formal publication and citation of data supports the recognition of research data as a first class research output. It also enables the generation of citation metrics for research data outputs. With products such as the Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index capturing data citation metrics, the potential for formal recognition and reward mechanisms based on data publishing is enhanced. ANDS is working with Thomson Reuters to enable direct feeds to and from Research Data Australia (RDA) in the DCI to show citations in RDA.
  • So if complying with publisher or funder requirements hasn’t urged you to share yet, perhaps this will..

    If you ARE able to share your data, you could benefit in in so many ways.

    Your data could be reused in ways you never thought possible. Potentially collaborating across disciplines!

    Increasing your citations!

    In order to increase your citation, you will need to assign a persistent identifier of some sort to your data – a DOI

    You can get a DOI for your datasets in many ways now.


    ----------------------------------------------------------


    Researchers within academic institutions are creating a rich resource of research data which has potential beyond the original scope of the project it was created for.
    Here are some quotes relating to the data deluge

    Huge volumes of research data, largely born digital and enabled by vast advances in computing power, are being generated worldwide.

    Research data are increasingly valued by research funders, institutions, governments, publishers and researchers themselves.

    As the volume and complexity of digital research data increases, so does the need to address the challenges of managing, selecting, retaining and storing it.


  • What are other researchers doing?

    We’ve talked about publishing your data formally with publishers but there are other ways that our researchers are sharing their data

    Some researchers are publishing their datasets directly into online Data Repositories such as Dryad, Zenodo or figshare. They enter metadata for their files and create a DOI for the dataset or insert a pre-existing DOI.
  • What are my sharing options at UWA?
  • Back on the library’s RDM Services page there is a link to Research Data online (RDO) – UWA’s Research Data Repository

  • By placing this data in the RDO we can assign either a DOI or locally generated handle to the data – allowing researchers to link publications to the underlying data (I mentioned PLOS earlier)

    Publicly accessible
    Discoverable
    DOIs OR Locally generated handles
    Harvested into RDA

  • Australia’s Research Data Metadata Repository.

    The Australian National Data Service (or ANDS) is funded by
    the Commonwealth under the National Research Infrastructure for Australia (NCRIS) Program

    They developed Research Data Australia (RDA)

    Research Data Australia, ANDS’ flagship service, provides a comprehensive window into the Australian Research Data Commons. It is an Internet-based discovery service designed to provide rich connections between data, projects, researchers and institutions, and promote visibility of Australian research data collections in search engines.

    UWA’s RDO feeds all metadata into RDA to make your research data discoverable
  • This is very librarian of me – but curation has been important from the time of the tablets!
    How are you going to retrieve your data? Will you know where to find it?
    You need to consider the metadata which you attach to a dataset file
    I’m talking about more than best practice in file naming (YYY-MM-DD)
    What if your data could be reused in ways you never thought possible, by other disciplines?
    Wouldn’t it be great to harness that? Imagine the citations you’ll generate?

    But if you want your data to be discoverable and reusable – you need to attach descriptive metadata
    For your sake… (if you want to reuse it or even to meet funder/publisher/institutional requirements) … For the future’s sake… and to leave your own legacy…


  • Daniel Himmelstein

    Researcher who spent months chasing permission to republish online data sets urges others to read up on the law.

    Knowledge from millions of biological studies encoded into one network — that is Daniel Himmelstein’s alluring description of Hetionet, a free online resource that melds data from 28 public sources on links between drugs, genes and diseases. But for a product built on public information, obtaining legal permissions has been surprisingly tough.
    When Himmelstein, a data scientist at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, contacted researchers for permission to reproduce their work openly, several said they were surprised that he had to ask. “It never really crossed my mind that licensing is an issue here,” says Jörg Menche, a bioinformatician at the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
    Menche rapidly gave consent — but not everyone was so helpful. One research group never replied to Himmelstein, and three replied without clearing up the legal confusion. Ultimately, Himmelstein published the final version of Hetionet in July — minus one data set whose licence forbids redistribution, but including the three that he still lacks clear permission to republish. The tangle shows that many researchers don’t understand that simply posting a data set publicly doesn’t mean others can legally republish it, says Himmelstein.
    The confusion has the power to slow down science, he says, because researchers will be discouraged from combining data sets into more useful resources. It will also become increasingly problematic as scientists publish more information online. “Science is becoming more and more dependent on reusing data,” Himmelstein says.
    Data-set laws
    Because a piece of data — a fact — cannot be copyrighted, many scientists think that a publicly posted data set that does not place explicit terms and conditions on access can simply be republished without legal problems. But that’s not necessarily correct, says Estelle Derclaye, a specialist in intellectual-property law at the University of Nottingham, UK.
    The European Union assigns specific database rights, independent of copyright, that aim to protect the investment made in compiling a database. Legally speaking, these rights prevent researchers such as Himmelstein from republishing data sets created by scientists in EU states without their consent.
    Other countries have different layers of legal protection. But even in jurisdictions such as the United States, where no separate rights exist to govern databases, there is still room for confusion. Although facts don’t qualify for copyright, the way they are compiled ­arguably might — if the act of making that compilation requires sufficiently creative expression. “The default legal position on how data may be used in any given context is hard to untangle,” according to a guide on licensing data issued by the Digital Curation Centre in Edinburgh, UK.
    Advocates of data-sharing accordingly recommend that researchers who are creating public databases add clear licences explaining how they intend their data to be reused and redistributed, and whether they waive any database rights.
    Lack of confidence
    In Himmelstein’s case, some of the data sets that he wanted to use had clear licences ­— and some of these prevented unrestricted redistribution, but others did not. The most frustrating part of his project, he says, was the feeling that good data were going to waste because their creators could not clarify whether he could republish them.
    Andrew Charlesworth, an intellectual-­property expert at the University of ­Bristol, UK, says that this may be because few re­­searchers were confident enough of the law to give Himmelstein clear guidance. “What you tend to find is that if nobody has a remit to answer those kinds of questions, they are not in a hurry to take it on,” he says.
    Even without clear permissions, Himmelstein is unlikely to face legal penalties for publishing Hetionet, says Jonathan Band, an intellectual-property lawyer with the law firm Policy Bandwidth in Washington DC — unless, that is, he mistakenly breached terms and conditions placed on the data sets. Academics who put their data sets publicly online usually intend their work to be available for others to republish freely; and no one has ever got into trouble for doing Himmelstein’s kind of project, Band adds.
    But Himmelstein is not convinced that he is legally in the clear — and feels that such ­uncertainty may deter other scientists from reproducing academic data. If a researcher launches a commercial product that is based on public data sets, he adds, the stakes of not having clear licensing are likely to rise. “I think these are largely untested waters, and most ­academics aren’t in the position to risk ­setting off a legal battle that will help clarify these issues,” he says.
    Nature 536, 16–17 (04 August 2016) doi:10.1038/536016a
  • Like with many things in life, essentially there are two paths to sharing data

    Restricted/mediated access or making it publicly accessible.

    Either way, its imperative that you consider which data licence you will apply to your data

    If you are thinking about sharing your data – the first thing you must consider are any confidentiality agreements which you have made with perhaps patients or ethical agreements made when you initiate your project.
  • A licence sets out how data can be used and reused and attributed
    All Australian data intended for reuse should have a licence
    This not only promotes reuse – enabling collaboration but more importantly, it gives the owner CONTROL and Credit
    To apply a license, you must have the rights to do so (Are you the ‘owner’? Have you reused 3rd party data?
    Choose the most open licence you can
    There is also an option for restrictive licenses which can bespoke your conditions of access and use.

    Make it visible on the document, repository record, and/or attached to the data



  • Storage options – think about preservation formats!

    Don’t get caught out think about how you will store you data… which medium? Which file format?

    What formats are going to last the distance if you or others want to reuse your data?

    What if someone questions your findings… and wants to see the underlying data?
  • Lets look at storage options


  • The IRDS is a secure, centrally located and maintained research data storage facility.

    Using your Pheme login you are directed to the Service desk to request storage.

    There are also other forms available to you form this page such as additional storage requests, change in ownership, access permissions and restore from backup.

    There are also how-to guides for various platforms.

    The Store is a drive which is mapped to your desktop.

    Staff are now able to access their home data from off campus, and from their mobile devices.
     
    This service is to be expanded to include access to IRDS Stores.
     
    Staff and Students with a UNIWA account and IRDS Store authority will have access to IRDS Stores via the UWA wireless network:
    On mobile devices, e.g. tablets and laptops, and
    Remotely from outside the UWA network, e.g. from home or via other research partners. 
     
    If you are the current owner of a Store, you are required to open a Service Desk incident indicating your Store Name and access preference (i.e. opt-out or opt-in for wireless access to your IRDS Store). 
     
    Whilst this access is secure, please ensure that you have installed reputable security software to your mobile devices to reduce the risk of unauthorised access. Please consider that it may be inappropriate to allow mobile access to sensitive data   We think that dot points make it clearer.
     

    Staff can now access their IRDS Stores via 3 methods:
     
    1.     Mapped Drive on your UWA PC
    2.     WebDAV access from your own PC/device (which will require some initial set up)
    3.     UniDrive web portal  https://unidrive.uwa.edu.au
     
     
    Full details on setting up your own device to access UniDrive can be found at the Staff Storage Page on the Information Services website :
    http://www.is.uwa.edu.au/ it-help /staff-all/storage 
     
    Any Stores with less than 50% usage for longer than 3 months will be automatically reduced in size.

    Additional Storage Requests can be made at any time.

    This will enable the IRDS to provide the best possible value for money for the University and meet immediate storage needs
  • The when using 3rd party data, sometimes a contract is signed between the researcher and the organisation providing the data – especially with regards to confidential data.

    This contract would stipulate whether or not the student would be allowed to save their data in particular locations.

    If this is the case, then I recommend that they seek legal advice from Legal Services first.
     


  • Regarding  file transfer, Drop Box is about as secure as email – so not very secure.
     
    UWA’s IGS provide advice on using public cloud storage services:
     
    Rule 3
    Public cloud services should not be used to transmit and share confidential or sensitive University information unless the information is in encrypted form and the risk associated with information being leaked is assessed as lower than the convenience of using the service.
    The security of cloud services varies from one service provider to another. In most cases, however, a cloud service is no more secure than the least-well secured email account. As such there are some risks of interception or account hacking when using third party online services.
    It is therefore recommended that if confidential information must be communicated via a cloud service that the information is encrypted. This is designed to align with the University’s Policy on Privacy of Electronic Material.
  • There are also some other internal and external policies which can guide the researcher:
     
    University Policy on: Institutional Data Centre
    University Policy on: Records Management
    Computer and Software Use Regulations
    University Policy on: Records Management
    UWA Code of Conduct for the Responsible Practice of Research
    UWA Recordkeeping Plan
    Western Australian University Sector Disposal Authority
    Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research
    University’s Policy on Privacy of Electronic Material
     
  • Business Information and Technology Services are about to launch the UniDrive Client for windows laptops and off-campus desktops,
    which will allow UWA Students to access their H: drive and IRDS shares,
    and Staff these shares plus their new UNIWA S: drive.
    The UniDrive Client utilises a windows app which provides a persistent connection to your UWA drive(s),
    meaning you only need to authenticate the first time you connect, until the next time you change your password.
    It will also allow offline connections, and sync the local copy of your folder with the one on the server the next time you connect.
    The UniDrive will appear in Windows Explorer, alongside any local drives.

    The UniDrive Client will offer similar functionality to Dropbox, but without the risk of hosting potentially sensitive data on a third party service.
    We’re hoping to have the service formally launched within a week or two – we just have a few tweaks to do and finish off the documentation before we can make it available for download.
  • The UniDrive Client utilises a windows app which provides a persistant connection to your UWA drive(s),
    meaning you only need to authenticate the first time you connect, until the next time you change your password.
    It will also allow offline connections, and sync the local copy of your folder with the one on the server the next time you connect.
    The UniDrive will appear in Windows Explorer, alongside any local drives.

    The UniDrive Client will offer similar functionality to Dropbox, but without the risk of hosting potentially sensitive data on a third party service.

    We’re hoping to have the service formally launched within a week or two – we just have a few tweaks to do and finish off the documentation before we can make it available for download.

  • Alex Reid is here today to also answer any questions
    We also have some Cloustor flyers here for you to look at .
  • Well that's a lot to consider and wouldn’t it be great to have a toolkit to help you create a data management plan and do the right things?
  • Well – you’re in luck!

    Advice and direction for best practice in data management

    File formats for preservation
    Metadata creation
    Storage advice
    Data sharing advice
    IP information & directives
    And RDM Planning templates

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