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UXSG16_When Policy Meets Design_JJ Lee

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Keynote speech in UXSG'16 conference

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UXSG16_When Policy Meets Design_JJ Lee

  1. 1. When Policy Meets Design 8 Sept 2016 | UXSG’16 JJ Lee Assistant Professor. Division of Industrial Design School of Design and Environment. NUS
  2. 2. When Policy Meets Design
  3. 3. When Policy Meets Design A decision-making system that the government adopts for its governance & public services A decision-making system that aims at changing existing situations into preferred based on design doing
  4. 4. Why the Modern Government Needs Transformation? Why & How Design can Bring the Transformation? What are Our Challenges & Remaining Questions? Transformation is a Mutual Process. When Policy Meets Design 1 2 3 4
  5. 5. 21st Century Problems
  6. 6. 21st Century Problems
  7. 7. 21st Century Problems
  8. 8. 21st Century Problems
  9. 9. 21st Century Problems Complex network of problems People’s needs & contexts are complex & dynamic Hard to define what is the core problem
  10. 10. 21st Century Problems People-centered Collaborative Exploratory Complex network of problems People’s needs & contexts are complex & dynamic Hard to define what is the core problem
  11. 11. Collaborative Exploratory Silos Expert-oriented Problem-fixing culture Modern Government? People-centered
  12. 12. Parliament of Britain 1793 2015
  13. 13. Are we trying to solve 21st Century problems with the 18th Century tool? Parliament of Britain 1793 2015
  14. 14. Collaborative Exploratory Silo Expert-oriented Problem-fixing culture Modern Government? Design People-centered
  15. 15. Citizen-oriented Collaborative Exploratory Modern Government? Empathy to Humans Design Silo Expert-oriented Problem-fixing culture
  16. 16. Citizen-oriented Collaborative Exploratory Modern Government? Empathy to Humans Co-creation Design Silo Expert-oriented Problem-fixing culture
  17. 17. Citizen-oriented Collaborative Exploratory Modern Government? Empathy to Humans Co-creation Framing Opportunities Design Prototyping & Iterations Silo Expert-oriented Problem-fixing culture
  18. 18. Very recently, this is happening in Asia, too. Gov 3.0 Design Group, Korea (2015)
  19. 19. Singapore government starts to see potentials of design.
  20. 20. It was a fresh, potential approach to try! …not sure how I could apply to my work, though. “Can I have the toolkit? We can then do design thinking!”
  21. 21. Truly embedding design capabilities, beyond one-off projects
  22. 22. Collaboration with the Ministry of Manpower since 2014
  23. 23. MOM’s Journey to Adopt Design Sought a new approach to bridge a gap between policy intent & people’s experience Collaboration projects with external design experts (e.g. IDEO) Sending the public officers to Stanford d.School
  24. 24. Behavioral Insights and Design Unit (BDU) Internal agency (est. 2013) that brings BI + Design approach to the Ministry MOM’s Journey to Adopt Design
  25. 25. Collaboration with NUS Design
  26. 26. Collaboration Model of NUS Design x MOM How could we truly embed design capabilities within the Ministry, beyond one-off projects?
  27. 27. How could we truly embed design capabilities within the Ministry, beyond one-off projects? Collaboration Model of NUS Design x MOM Reflection & Implementation Design Capability Building A Series of Collaborative Projects1 2 3 • BA Design Studios (11-13 week project) • 4th project now started • Student internship for the development • Follow-up project for implementation • Follow-up interviews with MOM officers • Workshops • Design capability mapping toolPilot Project (2014)
  28. 28. Design-Driven Transformation of the Government Service Offerings Practices, Skills & Mindsets Organizational Structure & Belief
  29. 29. Design-Driven Transformation of the Government Service Offerings Practices, Skills & Mindsets Collaborative Design Projects Organizational Structure & Belief
  30. 30. Design-Driven Transformation of the Government Service Offerings Practices, Skills & Mindsets Collaborative Design Projects Follow-up interviews for design impactsStudent Interns Organizational Structure & Belief
  31. 31. Design-Driven Transformation of the Government Service Offerings Practices, Skills & Mindsets Collaborative Design Projects Follow-up interviews for design impacts Design capabilities workshops Student Interns Mapping tool Organizational Structure & Belief
  32. 32. Design-Driven Transformation of the Government Service Offerings Practices, Skills & Mindsets Collaborative Design Projects Follow-up interviews for design impacts Design capabilities workshops Student Interns Mapping tool Evaluating Success & Impact Scaling up Long-term functioning structure Sharing cases Organizational Structure & Belief
  33. 33. Design-Driven Transformation of the Government Service Offerings Practices, Skills & Mindsets Public Sector Design Ladder (Design Council UK, 2013) Organizational Structure & Belief
  34. 34. MOM Services Centre (2014)1 Temporary Job Scheme Process (2015)2 Employment of Foreign Domestic Workers (2016)3 Job redesign for Older Workers (2016)4
  35. 35. Some Principles for Designing with Government
  36. 36. Reframing the Project Brief: Problem-Solving à Exploratory Project 1 (2014): Original Brief Efficient service for walk-in customers at the MOM services centre Reframed brief Supporting Self-Help (effective education & communication, outreach) MOM game card set & ambassador program for dormitories Outreach e-kiosk Some Principles for Designing with Government
  37. 37. Continuous Involvement of the Public Officers Testing prototypes at the Services Centre (2014) Students learn complex issues around policies & enhance feasibility of their ideas Public officers build empathy, understand design, gain ownership Some Principles for Designing with Government
  38. 38. Perspective Shift from “Why this is impossible” to “What can make this possible” done by John Teo, Chan Shi Ming, Wilmer Tay (2016) Some Principles for Designing with Government
  39. 39. Aiming at Impacts, beyond Deliverables Progressive learning toolkit for employers & FDWs (2016) done by Chan Wing Kei, Huang Yixuan, Jomains Neo & Shanti Alberti Some Principles for Designing with Government
  40. 40. Deliverables: Toolkits Impacts: Co-creation project for Implementation Aiming at Impacts, beyond Deliverables Some Principles for Designing with Government
  41. 41. Follow-up interviews •  How the officers think of the benefits and limitations of design in their work? •  What are the challenges in bringing design within the government? •  What are the opportunities?
  42. 42. There are design advocates! Then, how to support them to apply in everyday work? Different expectations of what design can do, due to their experience & job scope Growing interests in design & support from the management
  43. 43. In the organization’s process of adopting design, how could we help the members realize different expectations of design among themselves, and achieve a shared understanding and a goal?
  44. 44. Design Capability Mapping Tool Allows employees to map their current perceptions on design, and facilitate a shared understanding within a team and an organization Design Capability Mapping Tool Tool that helps members map their current perceptions on design, and facilitate a shared understanding within a team and an organization
  45. 45. Research by Yvonne Yeo, NUS
  46. 46. Questions related to key mindsets & practices for each phase Research by Yvonne Yeo (NUS) Levels of maturity
  47. 47. Research by Yvonne Yeo (NUS)
  48. 48. Research by Yvonne Yeo (NUS)
  49. 49. Research by Yvonne Yeo (NUS)
  50. 50. •  6 month-long employee-driven design projects (Mar– Aug 2016) •  Two rounds of testing: First & last workshop Setting for the Pilot Test: Behavioral Design Platform
  51. 51. Individual • Map their design-related perceptions & practices • Goal-setting for what skillsets they want to develop Team • Identify (mis)alignment in members’ understanding • Facilitate a shared understanding of design & goals
  52. 52. as Conversation Piece Enhance designers’ ability to engage organizations into a conversation about their own design legacies & visions (Junginger 2015)
  53. 53. UNDERSTAND DESIGN TEST IMPLEMENT For understanding project challenges, your team tends to churn available data or seeks views from internal discussions or through cross-department collaborations. Your team considers the role of end-users as ’functional informants’ who can give you feedback on service transactions (MOMster). There seems to be less experiences on end-user engagement in the design process, especially for the product owners. Your team may benefit from deeper understanding of end-users’ real experiences, including their motivations, goals, value system, social relationships, worries and frustrations both at work and life. These may help your team identify what actually stops them from using MOMster (perhaps not only because of its features but because of their social and cultural surroundings), and what can motivate them to use MOMster. Understanding the root causes of low user engagement of MOMster may help you design in a more platform- level than a fragmented, single problem-solving level. Your team has strength in prototype development, engaging in a series of co-creation activities by using prototypes in various fidelity-levels, partnering product owners, developers (programmers) and users will benefit your project. Whereas your team members have done prototype testing with end-users and other stakeholders, the project owner might lack the experience of involving end-users for prototype testing. Gaining end-users’ feedbacks early in the design process and iterative along the process will help the team refine design directions relevant to the end users. As majority of team members have done prototype tests with end users, it will be great to explore more testing methods that can be done in different phases of the design process. You may consider to seek ways and resources to do pilot test with real users in long-term. Your team has experiences on creating communication materials to brief involved stakeholders, including implementing departments. Perhaps you could also think of ways to involve these people who will ‘actually’ implement in essential stages of the project to increase their understanding. Overall, your team has the mind-set to monitor the impacts of the project. Your team may consider creating effective, regular communication milestones with the implementers. If the measurement of the impact of the project is against KPIs, make sure that the criteria to measure KPIs are shared by the various stakeholders to have the same view. project MOMstars • Experts who are used to fix the problems • Could benefit from ‘holistic views to users’: their motivations and values at work and life, their worries and frustrations, short-term and long-term goals, social-cultural surroundings. • Do tap on existing prototyping skills to make them more participatory and iterative • Benefit from empathic design methods to learn users’ experiences, journey system visualisation and co-creation approaches “Expert Repairer” Conversation Piece for a team & between a designer and a team Research by Yvonne Yeo (NUS)
  54. 54. Transformation is a mutual process. Government / Policy making Design
  55. 55. Transformation is a mutual process. Government / Policy making Design Mindset: Learning organization’s legacy & tapping on enablers Discipline & Community: Expanding, redefining the areas of expertise
  56. 56. Critical questions. Portability of this collaboration model? Teaching design to the staff who has domain knowledge? or Teaching designers the domain knowledge?
  57. 57. Thank you. Q&A Jung-Joo Lee jjlee@nus.edu.sg servicedesignlab.net

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