What have you learnt about
technologies from the process of
constructing this product?
Research/communication Tools
During the first portion of this project, me and
my group had to do a lot of researching.
Eve...
Video sharing/research
YouTube proved an invaluable source in more
than one way. It is a video-hosting site, which allows ...
Video database
Artofthetitle.com is a site full of title sequences for
films, as well as reviews and information about the...
Presentation/communication
Blogger was the tool we used most as a group. It is a blogging site that allows
you to create a...
Group Communication
Facebook is a social networking site, designed to make communication and
sharing as simple as possible...
Presentation of Research
Prezi is a website which allows you to create and design dynamic and engaging
presentations in an...
Film-making Tools
The second portion of this project involved
actually filming, and editing the film. For
this, we needed ...
Filming
For the filming, we used standard definition Sony cameras, as well as tripods.
The cameras that we used proved to ...
Editing
iMovie was our choice of video editing software. It is the standard
software that comes with Mac’s, and allows you...
Hardware
The computers we used to edit all of our footage were iMacs. Fully
compatible with iMovie and with enough RAM to ...
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What have you learnt about technologies in the process of constructing this product?

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A list of technologies I used to create my media piece, and their pros and cons.

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What have you learnt about technologies in the process of constructing this product?

  1. 1. What have you learnt about technologies from the process of constructing this product?
  2. 2. Research/communication Tools During the first portion of this project, me and my group had to do a lot of researching. Everything from codes and convention of horror films, to The Rule of Thirds and how to frame our shots. We also had to present our findings in a clear, engaging and organised manner. As well as having to communicate effectively between each other, in order to collaborate our efforts on certain tasks.
  3. 3. Video sharing/research YouTube proved an invaluable source in more than one way. It is a video-hosting site, which allows you to share videos that you’ve found or made on social networks, as well as embed them into blogs or presentations. I found that YouTube helped in researching the conventions of horror openings, as I could watch and take notes of a number of openings to a number of different films, I could also take these videos as examples and share them with my group, to develop a better idea of what our film could turn out like. In addition to this, we as a group could use YouTube to upload draft cuts, or research videos that we had made. However, since the content on YouTube is uploaded by users, there is no quality guarantee and it’s not always possible to find what you’re looking for. In addition to this, embedded YouTube videos in Blogger had a tendency to not work, although I do not know if this problem lay with Blogger or YouTube.
  4. 4. Video database Artofthetitle.com is a site full of title sequences for films, as well as reviews and information about the films themselves. This website was very useful when researching what a horror opening sequence should consist of. It provides both opening and closing credits, and is much more refined for its purpose than YouTube. You can browse by designers & studios, or use the search function. The site also has extra information such as detailed synopsis and even interviews with creators The downsides to the use of this site was that it wasn’t always clear whether you were watching a beginning or ending sequence, and it was sometimes difficult to find the films you were looking for. Also, the videos could not be embedded into Blogger, which meant that to illustrate any research, I would have had to substitute an embedded video with multiple screenshots.
  5. 5. Presentation/communication Blogger was the tool we used most as a group. It is a blogging site that allows you to create and shape your own blog, as well as read the blogs of others, and contribute to other people’s blogs. By creating our own blogs we were capable of collating all of our research into one place, which helped to keep things organised and on track. Blogger was great for the integration of videos and pictures into blog posts. It was also useful to be able to connect to one another’s blogs within our group, as we could keep track of each others work, share work in a flash, and access all of our collaborative work from anywhere. Blogger was very easy to get used to and provided many design options for beginners. My biggest complaint about Blogger would be that I had to create a Gmail account to use it. I would also say that it was a lot of hassle to get connected to each other’s blogs, and using pictures in your blog posts was generally a disastrous experience. As a suggestion I would also have liked the option to incorporate Word or Publisher documents into blog posts, as this would have cut down on a lot of Copy&Pasting.
  6. 6. Group Communication Facebook is a social networking site, designed to make communication and sharing as simple as possible. It has a very fluid and simple Instant Messaging system. The biggest advantage of using Facebook to communicate is that it is incredibly popular. Everybody in our group had it, was well versed in it’s use, and had access to it not only from home but from their mobile devices. We organised ourselves into a ‘chat’ which allowed us to have instant, rapid conversations about our work at any time in the day, and from anywhere. It was much more efficient to discuss things this way than it was to use Blogger. Facebook also allowed us to share Word documents and research so that it could be instantly accessible, and we could receive instant feedback. The problems we faced with Facebook are derived from it’s advantages. The pace of conversation is so quick that sometimes a member of the group would miss important discussions, and pieces of research which were attached to messages would be buried by chit-chat. This led to a lot of repeating ourselves.
  7. 7. Presentation of Research Prezi is a website which allows you to create and design dynamic and engaging presentations in an infinite number of ways. It’s a great way to present research. An extremely useful technology. Prezi was easy to get started with and allowed for the presentation of information in a less boring way. There are a number of templates to choose from but you can get really creative with where your presentations go. It was also very easy to embed Prezis into blog posts, and share them around the group. All of your work is stored online, so it can be accessed anywhere. There were occasions when Prezi didn’t work or wouldn’t load, which was a pain. Also, the User Interface does take a little bit of getting used to- it isn’t as smooth as, say, Powerpoint. In addition, I had technical problems in trying to import an image from my flash drive into my Prezi, so it wasn’t an entire success.
  8. 8. Film-making Tools The second portion of this project involved actually filming, and editing the film. For this, we needed filming equipment and editing software. This was important because we were tasked with creating a piece of ‘professional quality’ so we would have needed to use technology that could keep up. We had to be able to record our shots, upload them to a computer and edit them into coherent footage.
  9. 9. Filming For the filming, we used standard definition Sony cameras, as well as tripods. The cameras that we used proved to be good in the sense that they were very user friendly, and compact. The footage was of reasonable quality and the camera battery lasted long enough for us to film the entirety of our piece in one day. These cameras also allowed for immediate playback, so we could watch what we had just filmed and determine whether we would need to reshoot, which was very important for the quality of the footage. The cameras, however, only filmed in standard definition, which did lead to limitations on what we could do to the footage in terms of editing. Also, the footage proved to look different on the camera than it did on screen, which resulted in us having to reshoot our project at one point. I would have preferred to use a HD camera, despite the fact that it would have led to extended upload times.
  10. 10. Editing iMovie was our choice of video editing software. It is the standard software that comes with Mac’s, and allows you to save and edit multiple different projects simultaneously. iMovie was very easy to use, and allowed us to precision edit our piece, as well as add in music and text overlays. As inexperienced editors, iMovie was a lot more easy to get the hang of than Final Cut. It also kept all of our progress saved, which put our minds at rest, and kept all of our raw footage stored so that it could be reused in case we needed it. It was simple and effective. What I liked about iMovie’s simplicity is also what I didn’t like about it. It seemed that there were a lot of things we couldn’t do, the process of editing felt quite ‘guided’ or ‘constricted’ and we did not have the tools to do whatever we liked, so to speak.
  11. 11. Hardware The computers we used to edit all of our footage were iMacs. Fully compatible with iMovie and with enough RAM to handle video editing tasks. The iMacs were fast, and effective when you know how to use them. The Mac OSX allowed for fluid and easy editing, and the Macs themselves made it very easy to handle multiple tasks at once. It was easy to upload our footage, and easy to import it all into iMovie. By using a portable USB flash drive we were able to very easily share information and files across multiple Macs, which helped us to split the workload. Using the iMacs for the first few times after only having used a PC before was quite difficult, some of the controls left me confused. It was not uncommon for the flash drive we used to not be recognised by the Macs, which was indeed problematic, and it was also oddly complicated to access files on our student drives. We also could not access our e-mail accounts, which was an issue for group communication.

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