20120302152555.phillip jordan on road safety at roadworks mataram

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20120302152555.phillip jordan on road safety at roadworks mataram

  1. 1. “Road safety at road work sites”Mataram 30th and 31st January 2012Phillip JordanIndII Consultant
  2. 2. Objectives of this presentation:1. To introduce you to road safety engineering.2. To introduce you to safer ways of managing your road work sites.3. To explain traffic management plans (TMP’s)
  3. 3. The world has a large road safety problem.o 1.3 million deaths each year on roads of the worldo More than 15 million people injuredo Expected to increase rapidly, unless action is takenurgentlyo A “Decade of Action in Road Safety” has started
  4. 4. Indonesia has a massive road safety problem32,000+ deaths each year on the roads of Indonesia (2010) Over 250,000 are injured (700 per day) - 2.5% of GDP 61% of deaths are motorcyclists 15% of deaths are pedestrians
  5. 5. Road safety engineering is one profession that has an importantrole to play in road safety. Police, teachers, researchers, doctorsand others also have important roles in road safety.
  6. 6. Manual 3 – Road Safety at Work SitesManual and accompanying DVD (Bahasa and English versions) A manual and audio visual aid that offers simple diagrams and information about how to sign and make various common types of road works (i.e., long- term on divided roads, short-term on busy undivided roads, work where a lane is closed, detours, etc)
  7. 7. GLOBAL ROAD SAFETY – A CHALLENGE FOR US ALL A typical scene in many rapidly motorising nations
  8. 8. Serious crashes at road work sitesare three times more commonthan on other sections of road.
  9. 9. A fatal bus crash outside Palembang – in a road work site
  10. 10. ARE YOUR ROAD WORKS UNSAFE? What do we look for? What more can we do? Do not blame drivers/riders for all crashes. Our roads are not perfect – we must improve them.
  11. 11. What is unsafe with this side track?
  12. 12. What is unsafe with this side track?
  13. 13. What is unsafe here?
  14. 14. Unsafe work practices No safety vests Few warning signs No protective barriersWhat is unsafe with this long term work site?
  15. 15. WE SHOULD NEVER BLAME ONLY THEDRIVERS/RIDERS? There is more that we (engineers ) can do to contribute to road safety for all!!
  16. 16. There should be no surprises on Indonesian roads!
  17. 17. WHAT IS A ROAD CRASH?“a rare, random, multi-factorial event in which one or more road users has failed to cope with their environment.”
  18. 18. AN UNNECESSARY TRAGEDY DUE TO ROAD WORKS! This man was one of five killed in a head-on crash with a truck in India. TheHighway was a divided highway (2 carriageways). The contractor had closed one carriageway for maintenance – sending all traffic two way along the othercarriageway. He did not inform the on-coming traffic to expect two way traffic – hence this tragedy. Remember this when you inspect the Airport Road later.
  19. 19. These are crashes – they are not “accidents” We should use the word “CRASH”Accident implies that : the cause was unpredictable no human could have done anything to prevent it it is outside of our “control” It was in the “hands of the gods”
  20. 20. We should use the word “CRASH”A road crash:• Can have “things” done to prevent it• Is within our “control”• Can be prevented• Is related closely to risk, and is predictable
  21. 21. A road crash is the end result of a chain of events…To break that chain, where do we start??Lets look at a “typical” chain of events……
  22. 22. The chain of events…… A 36 year old male is the driver of this truck. He is also the mechanic. His boss allows him to drive it home some weekends.
  23. 23. The chain of events…… One weekend, he spends the whole (frustrating) weekend repairing it (especially the brakes which were worn) He finishes late Sunday – it took much more time than he had expected Friends drop around – just as he finishes the repair work Relaxing - they drink and talk until very late He does not get much sleep
  24. 24. The chain of events……  Monday morning – he must start early loading sand at the river near the city.  Little sleep, no breakfast, late for work.  Drives the truck along a National Highway towards work.
  25. 25. The chain of events……  Traffic is heavy.  The highway has unsealed shoulders.
  26. 26. The chain of events…… He travels fast. Many motorcyclists – plus some pedestrians and bicyclists. Light rain is falling.
  27. 27. The chain of events…… He drives very close to the truck ahead of him – impatient to overtake. He tries several times. The truck ahead has dirty/broken brake lights. There is a bus in front of that truck.
  28. 28. The chain of events…… The road is very “slick” - it has little skid resistance. Wet. There are no sealed shoulders. Many big “drop-offs” from the pavement.
  29. 29. The chain of events…… He knows there is an overtaking lane ahead – he accelerates to overtake the slow bus and truck.
  30. 30. The chain of events…… Suddenly........roadworks! The slow lane is blocked; no advanced warning signs. The bus and the other truck swerve to the right - without warning.
  31. 31. The chain of events…… Suddenly........roadworks! The slow lane is blocked; no advanced warning signs. The bus and the other truck swerve to the right - without warning.
  32. 32. The chain of events…… Our 36 year old driver has no time to react – to avoid a “side swipe” collision he swings his truck to the right hoping to miss the other truck – hardly slowing. At that instant a motorcycle with 3 girls on it is travelling past in the other direction. They are not wearing helmets!
  33. 33. The chain of events…… Our truck driver brakes late and hard – but the new brakes “grab”. The truck strikes the motorcyclists. It then side swipes the bus – tipping it over.
  34. 34. One passenger dead
  35. 35. • Two motorcyclists killed (head injuries), one very seriously injured. One bus passenger also dies.• Police and legal action follows What - in this chain of events - „caused‟ the crash ?
  36. 36. Possible causes………• His frustrating weekend?• His drinking?• His lack of sleep?• Excessive speed?• His impatience and inattention?• The girls on the motorcycle – not wearing helmets?• The new brakes of his truck?• The dirty/broken brake lights of the other truck?• The rain?• The bus and truck swerving road because of the roadworks?• Materials being stored on the road?• The “slick” road conditions?• The lack of sealed shoulders?• The big “drop-off” from the pavement?• No advanced warning of the roadworks?
  37. 37.  Engineers could have broken this chain of events by:  Sealing the shoulders (create an “escape” route)  Eliminating the big drop offs from pavements  Store materials off the road  Much better advanced warning of the road works Improving the roads – and especially roadworks sites – is one of the best things an engineer can do to improve road safety in Indonesia. YOU CAN SAVE LIVES!
  38. 38. HOW CAN WE SAVE LIVES AT ROADWORKS?BY ENSURING – AT ALL OUR ROADWORKS – THAT WE:  Warn  Inform  Guide  Control  Forgive
  39. 39. Road engineers should....o warno informo guideo controlo forgive Warning plus regulatory traffic signs
  40. 40. Road engineers should.... o warn o inform o guide o control o forgive SPECIFIC INFORMATION
  41. 41. Road engineers should....o warno informo guideo controlo forgive SPECIFIC INFORMATION
  42. 42. Road engineers should.... o warn o inform o guide o control o forgive Plastic bollards, hazard markers
  43. 43. Road engineers should....o warno informo guideo controlo forgive Traffic controllers
  44. 44. Road engineers should.... o warn o inform o guide o control o forgive Speed limits
  45. 45. Road engineers should.... o warn o inform o guide o control o forgive Temporary barriers
  46. 46. Road engineers should.... Jelek!o warno informo guideo controlo forgive Very unsafe barriers
  47. 47. Road engineers should.... Jelek!o warno informo guideo controlo forgive Very unsafe location
  48. 48. Road engineers should....o warno informo guide Jelek!o controlo forgive Very unforgiving location
  49. 49. Traffic control at road works is a major problem in most developing countries
  50. 50. EVERYONE HAS A ROLE IN ROAD SAFETYAT WORK SITES Supervising engineers : Be aware of their responsibility to manage the site safely Appoint a Safety Engineer Provide safety training for all staff Monitor the site for safety Workers: Take responsibility for their own safety Follow all safety directions Wear safety vests at all times on the road Road users: Comply with all road rules, including speed limits
  51. 51. 14At road works  Recurringunsafe practices observed in Indonesia at roadworks  Insufficient visibility to first advance warning signs  In the urban area, signs hidden by parked vehicles.  In rural areas, no advanced signs – or sometimes hidden by grass, trees  Use of illegal (unofficial) signs  Use of concrete blocks as delineators  Signs blown over  Little/no use of speed restriction signs  Lack of signing of side roads  Lack of flashing lights on construction plant
  52. 52. 15At road works Recurring unsafe practices observed in Indonesia at roadworks  Lack of cones, and often no tapers.  Tapers too short.  Use of painted 44 gallon drums filled with concrete.  Excavations not separated enough from the traffic.  Little or no delineation of excavations.  No barrier protection for worker safety.  No barrier protection for pedestrians.  Workers not wearing high visibility clothing.
  53. 53. NO TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT OR CONTROL
  54. 54. TOO MANY SIGNS TOGETHER, CONFUSING
  55. 55. NO SIGNS TO WARN OF SUDDEN CHANGE IN PAVEMENT
  56. 56. UNSAFE “BARRIERS”, NO TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT OFONE LANE, TWO WAY TRAFFIC
  57. 57. NO WARNING OF STOCKPILE AHEAD ON THISNATIONAL HIGHWAY
  58. 58.  IndII and DGH has developed a manual to assist you, Contractors and Consultants to plan and implement safer road works sites. Please follow the manual to make your road works safer – for all.
  59. 59. Manual 3 explains...........LONG TERM WORKS - LONGER THAN ONE DAYSHORT TERM WORKS - MOBILE - STATIONARYZONE CONCEPT - ADVANCE WARNING ZONE - TRANSITION ZONE - WORK ZONE - TERMINATION ZONEENCOURAGES YOU TO PLAN YOUR WORKSENCOURAGES YOU TO DEVELOP A TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PLANGIVES YOU SOME DRAWINGS TO GUIDE YOU
  60. 60. PART A – AN INTRODUCTION TOROAD WORK SAFETY
  61. 61. Five phases of managing a work site
  62. 62. FIRSTLY, YOUR ROAD WORKS NEEDS A TRAFFICMANAGEMENT PLAN What is a Traffic Management Plan (TMP)?
  63. 63. TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PLANS (TMP’S) A TMP is a plan that shows the signs, barriers and devices to be used at your work site for the duration of your work. A TMP should be prepared by an experienced and qualified engineer. It should then be checked for accuracy and safety. It is then implemented
  64. 64. An example of a TMP
  65. 65. Steps in preparing your Traffic Management Plan
  66. 66. LONG TERM WORKS
  67. 67. SHORT TERM (MOBILE) WORKS
  68. 68. Steps in preparing your Traffic Management Plan
  69. 69. PLANNING YOUR ROAD WORKS IS IMPORTANT Minimise the number of “starts” and “stops” along your road work. Have plenty of “good” signs available for use. Reflective. Clean. Correct. Make sure staff are trained and aware. It is their safety too! Safety vests for all.
  70. 70. Steps in preparing your Traffic Management Plan
  71. 71. Steps in preparing your Traffic Management Plan
  72. 72. Through work area – most common.
  73. 73. Past work area – also common.
  74. 74. A side track ( by-pass) – less common.
  75. 75. A detour – mainly in urban areas.
  76. 76. Planning
  77. 77. Safety vests are essential for all workers
  78. 78. Think also of managing speeds and managing clearance distance between your workers and the vehicles
  79. 79. Steps in preparing your Traffic Management Plan
  80. 80. REMEMBER
  81. 81. Five phases of managing a work site
  82. 82. PART B – THE ZONE CONCEPT
  83. 83. Typical work zones
  84. 84. Typical work zones
  85. 85. Advance warning zone
  86. 86. Transition guidance zone
  87. 87. Work zone
  88. 88. Termination zone
  89. 89. Five phases of managing a work site
  90. 90. PART C - TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICESFOR USE AT ROAD WORK SITES
  91. 91. MANUAL 3 PART C TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES FOR USE AT ROAD WORK SITES What these are? Signs Where they can be safely used? What design features to note? What these are? Speed restrictions What design features to note? What these are? Barriers Where they can be safely used - offsets, behind kerbing, deflections? What design features to note? Details of a variety of other devices Other devices such as lights, flags, flagmen, truck mounted attenuators, temporary signals.
  92. 92. Signs – the most commondevice used at road works.
  93. 93. Multi message signs areuseful for road works
  94. 94. THREE COMMON PROBLEMS WITH SIGNSAT INDONESIAN ROAD WORKS No signs, or not enough signs Dirty, non-reflective signs (often incorrect ) Too many signs, wrongly placed too close together
  95. 95. No signs entering road works
  96. 96. No signs departing road works
  97. 97. Not enough signs to alert drivers/riders
  98. 98. Wrong sign – no workers here
  99. 99. Wrong sign – no workers here after hours
  100. 100. No signs to direct drivers/riders
  101. 101. Placing signs
  102. 102. SPEED MANAGEMENT Engineers must install correct signs Police must then enforce the new limit
  103. 103. THINK ABOUT - AND ACT ON – ROADWORKS SPEED LIMITS
  104. 104. Use a lower speed limit at your worksite if:- Workers will be closer than 3m to the traffic- Machinery will have to share the road with moving traffic- The H or V geometry will be effected by the road works sothat sight lines may be reduced.- There is loose material on the road.- Pedestrians and/or bicyclists may be present
  105. 105. Remember line marking
  106. 106. Two way traffic in a single traffic lane Give Way sign Temporary traffic signals Traffic controllers – each end with radios Do nothing – let traffic sort itself out!
  107. 107. Do nothing – high risk, especially at night
  108. 108. Five phases of managing a work site
  109. 109. FOLLOW UP INSPECTION TO REPORTIMPROVEMENTS Approximately one month after this workshop, IndII consultants will again visit your EINRIP work site and will audit your signs/devices. IndII wants to see that our workshops are effective. We want you to help us but (most of all) help the road users.
  110. 110. PART D – INDONESIAN CASE STUDIES
  111. 111. Case study 1
  112. 112. Case study 2
  113. 113. Case study 3
  114. 114. Case study 4
  115. 115. Case study 5
  116. 116. Case study 6
  117. 117. Case study 7
  118. 118. Case study 8
  119. 119. Case study 10
  120. 120. Case study 11
  121. 121. Case study 12
  122. 122. Case study 13
  123. 123. Case study 14
  124. 124. Case study 15
  125. 125. Case study 16
  126. 126. PART E – SETTING OUT DIAGRAMS
  127. 127. For Indonesian roads Two lane, two way road Work site on the road, but still space for two lanes Provide advanced warning Manage the speeds Inform drivers of where to go Guide them there Manage them past the work site Tell them when they are out of the zone
  128. 128. For Indonesian roads Two lane, two way road Work site on the road, but only space for one lane Provide advanced warning Manage the speeds Inform drivers of where to go Guide them there Manage them past the work site – give way signs or traffic controllers Tell them when they are out of the zone
  129. 129. For Indonesian roads Two lane, one way road Work site on the road, but only space for one lane Provide advanced warning Manage the speeds Inform drivers of where to go Guide them into one lane – warning signs for lane drop Manage them past the work site – give strong tapers with plastic bollards Tell them when they are out of the zone
  130. 130. For Indonesian roads Two lane, two way road Work site on the road, traffic drives through work site Provide advanced warning Manage the speeds Separate the two directions with delineators Tell them when they are out of the zone
  131. 131. For Indonesian roads Two lane, two way road – being duplicated Work site closing one carriageway, all traffic to be detoured Provide advanced warning Manage the speeds Inform drivers of where to go Build an all weather detour track (fit for motorcycles too!) Guide them there Separate the two directions with strong delineation with bollards Tell them when they are out of the zone
  132. 132. For Indonesian roads Two lane, two way road Work site closing one direction, all traffic to be detoured via one way side track Provide advanced warning Manage the speeds Inform drivers of where to go Build an all weather detour track (fit for motorcycles too!) Guide them there Provide strong delineation with bollards Tell them when they are out of the zone
  133. 133. REMEMBER
  134. 134. As the engineer responsible for a road work site,ensure that you act on the following key points:• Always prepare a traffic management plan.• Use the Zone Concept.• Make sure the zones are long enough to perform correctly.• For larger projects, have the TMP audited by an independentteam.• Work with local Traffic Police to keep speeds low through thework site.• Ensure the Contractor has sufficient signs/cones to fullycomply with your TMP.• Maintain a Safety (Buffer) Zone around the Work Area toprotect your workers.
  135. 135. As the engineer responsible for a road work site,ensure that you act on the following key points:• Never allow concrete blocks/branches/rocks to be used fordelineation.• Inspect your work site every day – repair or replace anymissing or damaged sign or device.• Keep equipment and materials out of the clear zone.• Sweep the road regularly.• Put yourself into “the shoes of the road user” – what will theymake of your work?• Finally – record all/any crashes in your work site. Learn fromthese – can improvements be made.

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