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'Food for Thought': Empowering and Enabling Meaningful, Enjoyable, Inclusive Action on the Goals

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Workshop: 'Food for Thought': Empowering and Enabling Meaningful, Enjoyable, Inclusive Action on the Goals
Ms. Kirsten Johnson Leask, RCE Scotland
11th Global RCE Conference
7-9 December, 2018
Cebu, the Philippines

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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'Food for Thought': Empowering and Enabling Meaningful, Enjoyable, Inclusive Action on the Goals

  1. 1. lfsscotland.org 11th Global RCE Conference ‘Food for Thought’ Kirsten Leask, November 2018
  2. 2. lfsscotland.org Workshop Overview Part A: Setting the Scene 1. About this workshop 2. A quality education 3. Education in Scotland 3. Sustainability and Scottish education 4. Embedding sustainability: the challenge 5. Embedding sustainability: meeting the challenge Part B: Soil to Plate learning Part C: Discussion
  3. 3. lfsscotland.org Part A: Setting the Scene
  4. 4. lfsscotland.org 1. About this workshop
  5. 5. Objectives • To examine what constitutes a ‘quality education’. • To explore the challenges of integrating sustainability across learning. • To participate in a practical and discussion-based learning journey centred around the theme of food.
  6. 6. lfsscotland.org 2. A quality education
  7. 7. A global goal Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning. 4.7 “By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.”
  8. 8. What does it look like in practice? = ? Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning. 4.7 “By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.”
  9. 9. A preparation for life • Meaningful • Relevant • Place-based • Learner-centric • Interdisciplinary • Inclusive • Transformative • Enjoyable • Empowering • Life-long • Beyond the school setting • Engages heads – hands – hearts. • Knowledge • Skills • Values • Attributes
  10. 10. Beyond the school gates Holistic… Affects Is effected by Global National Community Setting Individual
  11. 11. Knowledge, skills, values and attributes Holistic… Empowers Is empowered by
  12. 12. lfsscotland.org 3. Education in Scotland
  13. 13. Structure • Coherent learning from 3-18 • Delivered through Four Contexts: • To create: Curriculum areas and subjects Interdisciplinary learning Ethos and life of the setting Opportunities for personal achievement • Effective contributors • Successful learners • Responsible citizens • Confident individuals
  14. 14. lfsscotland.org 4. Sustainability and Scottish education
  15. 15. 4. Building on strong foundations • An entitlement for all learners, and a whole-setting approach. • Embedded in whole-school self-evaluation. • Central to Professional Standards for teachers. • Woven throughout the Scottish curriculum.
  16. 16. At the heart of our national vision • Mirrored in the Scottish Government’s National Performance Framework.
  17. 17. lfsscotland.org 5. Embedding sustainability: the challenges
  18. 18. Joining the dots How can we join the dots? Practitioner confidence and ‘agency’ Plethora of policies and strategies Time Conflicting priorities Lone champion ‘Issue- fatigue’ Conflicting narratives ‘Finding the hook’ for learners
  19. 19. lfsscotland.org 5. Embedding sustainability: meeting the challenges
  20. 20. The food lens Meaningful Relevant Place-based Learner-centric Interdisciplinary Inclusive Transformative Enjoyable Empowering Engages heads, hands, hearts Life-long Beyond the school setting
  21. 21. The food lens in a global context
  22. 22. The food lens in a Scottish context Food National Improvement Framework Curriculum for Excellence Developing the Young Workforce HGIOS/ HGIOELC Getting it Right for Every Child Learning for Sustainability
  23. 23. The food lens in a Scottish context
  24. 24. The food lens in a Scottish context
  25. 25. lfsscotland.org Part B: Soil to plate learning
  26. 26. What is ‘Soil to Plate’ learning? 1. Learning where food comes from 2. Growing/ rearing my own food 3. Preparing my own food 4. Sharing and celebrating my food Practical: • Skills • Knowledge • Values • Attributes
  27. 27. What is ‘Soil to Plate’ learning? 1. Learning where food comes from 2. Growing/rearing my own food 3. Preparing my own food 4. Sharing and celebrating my food Practical: • Skills • Knowledge • Values • Attributes
  28. 28. What is ‘Soil to Plate’ learning? 1. Learning where food comes from 2. Growing/rearing my own food 3. Preparing my own food 4. Sharing and celebrating my food Understanding global food systems Understanding how my food gets to me Creating confident consumers Food culture past, present, near and far Wider: • Skills • Knowledge • Values • Attributes
  29. 29. 1. Understanding global food systems “The first supermarket supposedly appeared on the (American) landscape in 1946. That is not very long ago. Until then, where was all the food? Dear folks, the food was in homes, gardens, local fields, and forests. It was near kitchens, near tables, near bedsides. It was in the pantry, the cellar, the back yard.” Joel Salatin
  30. 30. 2. Understanding how my food gets to me “We live not by the jingling of our coin, but the fullness of our harvests.” Patrick Geddes
  31. 31. 3. Creating confident consumers “Health inequalities are the biggest issue facing Scotland just now, because not only are health inequalities a problem but health inequalities are really a manifestation of social inequality. Social complexity – social disintegration – drives things like criminality, it drives things like poor educational attainment, it drives a whole range of things that we would want to see different in Scotland. The more attention we can get paid to the drivers of that situation, the better.” Sir Harry Burns, former Chief Medical Officer for Scotland
  32. 32. 4. Food culture: past, present, near and far. “Laughter is brightest where food is best.” Irish proverb
  33. 33. lfsscotland.org Part C: Discussion
  34. 34. lfsscotland.org 11th Global RCE Conference Thank you. Kirsten Leask, November 2018

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