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Looking after yourself: Self-care in OOSH

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Keynote presentation by Hunter Institute of Mental Health Senior Project Officer Celia Rae for the OOSH Annual Retreat 2016.

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Looking after yourself: Self-care in OOSH

  1. 1. Looking after yourself: Self-care in OOSH Celia Rae, MPH, MHM, BA Senior Project Officer Hunter Institute of Mental Health
  2. 2. Hunter Institute of Mental Health The Hunter Institute of Mental Health is a leading national organisation dedicated to reducing mental illness and suicide and improving wellbeing for all Australians. For more than 20 years we have been delivering successful, evidence-based mental health and suicide prevention programs from our base in Newcastle, NSW.
  3. 3. Overview • Mental health; • Mental illness and accessing help; • Burnout; • Looking after your wellbeing; • Warning signs; • Stress management techniques; • Mindfulness; • Guided visualisation; • Questions.
  4. 4. Taking care
  5. 5. Mental health and wellbeing • Mental health is NOT mental illness; • Often terms used interchangeably; • We all have mental health; • Some us of experience mental illness.
  6. 6. Our mental health impacts our… • Physical health;
  7. 7. Physical health • Mental illness = higher risk of chronic physical illness; = 3 x risk of stroke; = 1.5 x risk of heart disease or diabetes. • Chronic physical illness = higher risk of mental illness; = 2 x risk of depression and anxiety.
  8. 8. Our mental health impacts our… • Physical health; • Quality of life;
  9. 9. Our mental health impacts our… • Physical health; • Quality of life; • Relationships;
  10. 10. Our mental health impacts our… • Physical health; • Quality of life; • Relationships; • Ability to cope with stress;
  11. 11. Our mental health impacts our… • Physical health; • Quality of life; • Relationships; • Ability to cope with stress; • Reach goals and fulfil potential.
  12. 12. How it affects children • Educator wellbeing influences student wellbeing; • Relationships are key for a child’s mental health; • Relationships can be difficult when experiencing poor mental health; • Mental illness does NOT mean unable to care for children.
  13. 13. Mental illness • Conditions that impact upon a person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviour; • Diagnosed by health professional; • No single cause, combination of factors; • Can be a single episode or ongoing; • Common – 45% of the population will experience mental illness in their lifetime.
  14. 14. Anxiety • 1 in 4 people, 1 in 3 women, 1 in 5 men; • Disorder occurs when: –Anxiety is frequent or persistent; –Not always connected to obvious challenge; –Impacts on quality of life; –Impacts on day-to-day functioning.
  15. 15. Symptoms of anxiety • Physical: Panic attacks, hot and cold flushes, racing heart, feeling tense; • Psychological: Excessive fear or worry, catastrophizing or obsessive thinking; • Behavioural: Avoiding situations that create anxiety, e.g. school or work.
  16. 16. Depression • 1 in 6 people, 1 in 5 women, 1 in 8 men; • Depression is characterised by: – Extreme sadness or low mood; – Lasting more than 2 weeks; – Loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities; – Impact on day-to-day functioning.
  17. 17. Symptoms of depression • Physical: Low energy, sleep problems, significant weight loss or gain; • Psychological: Feeling overwhelmed, sad, irritable, thinking negatively about yourself; • Behavioural: Withdrawing socially, unable to concentrate, diet and sleep changes.
  18. 18. Treating anxiety and depression • Range of treatments: – Self-care; – Online self-help www.mindhealthconnect.org.au; – Psychological treatments; – Medical treatments.
  19. 19. Help-seeking • Visit beyondblue for info: www.beyondblue.org.au; • Visit your GP; • See a psychologist; • Ask GP for a referral to a psychiatrist.
  20. 20. Crisis support • Lifeline: 13 11 14 or www.lifeline.org.au • Suicide Call Back Service: 1300 659 467 or www.suicidecallbackservice.org.au • SANE Australia: 1800 18 7263 or www.sane.org • beyondblue: 1300 22 4636 or www.beyondblue.org.au • MensLine Australia: 1300 78 99 78 or www.mensline.org.au
  21. 21. Burnout in the workplace • Workplace stressors: – Under pressure with workload and responsibilities; – Unrealistic deadlines; – Long working hours; – Insufficient breaks; – Lack of resources; – Negative relationships with co-workers.
  22. 22. Warning signs • Struggling at work; • Letting work encroach on personal life; • Low morale; • Feeling undervalued, disconnected; • Poor attendance; • Poor performance; • Avoiding family/friends; • Using alcohol/drugs to cope.
  23. 23. Looking after yourself
  24. 24. Sleep hygiene • Obey your body clock;
  25. 25. Sleep hygiene • Obey your body clock; • Improve sleeping environment;
  26. 26. Sleep hygiene • Obey your body clock; • Improve sleeping environment; • Avoid drugs;
  27. 27. Sleep hygiene • Obey your body clock; • Improve sleeping environment; • Avoid drugs; • Relax your mind;
  28. 28. Sleep hygiene • Obey your body clock; • Improve sleeping environment; • Avoid drugs; • Relax your mind; • Lifestyle adjustments.
  29. 29. Exercise • Fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety; • 16 week exercise program = antidepressants; • Release feel-good chemicals; • Reduce immune system chemicals; • Increase body temperature.
  30. 30. Exercise • Gain confidence; • Distraction from worries; • Social interaction; • Coping in healthy way.
  31. 31. Keeping well • Healthy food; • Limit alcohol/drugs; • Time with family and friends; • Recharge and relax; • Spirituality.
  32. 32. In the workplace • Work/life balance; • Non-work friends; • Mentoring; • Supporting colleagues; • Inclusive of diversity; • Reflective practice.
  33. 33. Monitoring wellbeing and seeking help • Warning signs; • Avoiding unhealthy coping strategies; • Seeking help when needed.
  34. 34. Stress management techniques • Increase self-care activities; • Exercise; • Debrief with friends or family.
  35. 35. Avoid or alter the situation • Avoid unnecessary stress: – Learn how to say “no”; – Avoid people who stress you out; – Take control of your environment.
  36. 36. Avoid or alter the situation • Avoid unnecessary stress: – Learn how to say “no”; – Avoid people who stress you out; – Take control of your environment. • Alter the situation: – Express feelings instead of bottling them up; – Be willing to compromise; – Manage time better; – Be more assertive.
  37. 37. Adapt and accept • Adapt to the stressor: – Reframe problems; – Look at the big picture; – Adjust your standards.
  38. 38. Adapt and accept • Adapt to the stressor: – Reframe problems; – Look at the big picture; – Adjust your standards. • Accept what you can’t change: – Don’t try to control the uncontrollable; – Look for the upside; – Learn to forgive; – Practice gratitude.
  39. 39. Mindfulness • Focusing attention on present moment; • Roots in Buddhism; • Improves wellbeing; • Improve physical health; • Treatment for mental illness; • More mindfulness = more effect.
  40. 40. Mindfulness techniques • Basic mindfulness meditation; • Body sensations; • Sensory; • Emotions; • Urge surfing.
  41. 41. Guided visualisation • Uses imagination to still mind; • Relax and refuel; • Achieve professional or personal goals; • Deeper awareness of self; • Physical and mental health benefits.
  42. 42. Mindfulness activity
  43. 43. Questions? Celia Rae Senior Project Officer Hunter Institute of Mental Health (02) 4924 6900 celia.rae@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au

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