Use Dialogue to Unleash Your Creative Potential Gregory S. Waddell Mid-South Christian College February 2006
Six Processes of Dialogue Listening Sharing Imagining Feeling Questioning Seeing
Listening <ul><li>What I hear you saying is . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Is this what you are telling me? </li></ul><ul><li>Thi...
Listening <ul><li>Empathy : The action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing ...
Listening by the L.A.W.S. Source: Laree S.  Kiely . Overcoming Time & Distance. In W. H. &  M.W . McCall,  Advances in Glo...
Negative Capability <ul><li>“ When a man is capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable re...
Sharing <ul><li>Communication Etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>Suspended Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty </li></ul>Socrat...
Sharing <ul><li>The key to NT  koinonia  was the idea of inclusion; every individual was considered a full participant in ...
Imagining <ul><li>“The subconscious mind is a storehouse of images and symbols, . . . which provides us with more than hal...
Feeling He doesn’t understand my feelings. She’s just not making any sense.
“ Our God is an Awesome God.” ─ Rich Mullins
Questioning <ul><li>Clarify </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrase </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize </li></ul><ul><li>Extend </li></ul><u...
Seeing <ul><li>Dialogue “is about discussing something openly and breaking through to new knowledge or insight.” </li></ul...
The Procedure <ul><li>Form a circle of chairs (no table). </li></ul><ul><li>Write a challenge question. </li></ul><ul><li>...
The Procedure <ul><li>Ask clarifying questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Pass the ball to another. </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize th...
We Agree To . . . <ul><li>Only the one with the ball can talk. </li></ul><ul><li>No interruptions. </li></ul><ul><li>No de...
Principles of Creative Thinking <ul><li>Random Association </li></ul><ul><li>Quantity breeds Quality </li></ul><ul><li>Def...
Becoming Real <ul><li>“ Real isn't how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It's a thing that happens to you. . . .” “Does...
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Use Dialogue to Unleash Your Creative Potential

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Dialogue is a fundamental ingredient of an organizational culture that values creativity. It is fundamental because without it, ideas are not challenged and leaders are protected from the scrutiny of diverse perspectives. Ideas become ingrained, encapsulated, and entrenched even when they have ceased to function or when new data has proven them to be obsolete. This presentation seeks to define what dialogue is. It looks at it as a process that involves six basic skills: listening, sharing, imagining, questioning, feeling, and seeing. It also outlines a simple procedure for leading your team through an exercise in dialogue.

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  • Use Dialogue to Unleash Your Creative Potential

    1. 1. Use Dialogue to Unleash Your Creative Potential Gregory S. Waddell Mid-South Christian College February 2006
    2. 2. Six Processes of Dialogue Listening Sharing Imagining Feeling Questioning Seeing
    3. 3. Listening <ul><li>What I hear you saying is . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Is this what you are telling me? </li></ul><ul><li>This is important, I want to make sure I understand. </li></ul><ul><li>Let me summarize what I hear you saying. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Listening <ul><li>Empathy : The action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and experience of another. </li></ul><ul><li>─ Mirriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary </li></ul>
    5. 5. Listening by the L.A.W.S. Source: Laree S. Kiely . Overcoming Time & Distance. In W. H. & M.W . McCall, Advances in Global Leadership . Vol. 2. Oxford: Elsevier Science. (pp. 185-216). What solution to you offer to resolve your concern? Solution. What worries you about his opinion? Worry. What can you add to his opinion? Add. What do you like about his opinion? Like.
    6. 6. Negative Capability <ul><li>“ When a man is capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason” </li></ul><ul><li>─ John Keats </li></ul><ul><li>“ The ability to not intrude, to wait, to be patient, to be on call, accessible as a resource.” </li></ul><ul><li>─ Jane Vella </li></ul>
    7. 7. Sharing <ul><li>Communication Etiquette </li></ul><ul><li>Suspended Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty </li></ul>Socrates’ Three Assumptions of Koinonia :
    8. 8. Sharing <ul><li>The key to NT koinonia was the idea of inclusion; every individual was considered a full participant in the fellowship of the Body of Christ. Nobody was viewed as a second-class citizen. </li></ul><ul><li>Q: What are some ways that we inadvertently convey to others that our opinion is more valuable than theirs? </li></ul>
    9. 9. Imagining <ul><li>“The subconscious mind is a storehouse of images and symbols, . . . which provides us with more than half the material of what we actually experience as ‘life.’ Without our knowing it, we see reality through glasses colored by the subconscious memory of previous experiences.” </li></ul><ul><li>─ Thomas Merton, No Man is an Island . </li></ul>
    10. 10. Feeling He doesn’t understand my feelings. She’s just not making any sense.
    11. 11. “ Our God is an Awesome God.” ─ Rich Mullins
    12. 12. Questioning <ul><li>Clarify </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrase </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize </li></ul><ul><li>Extend </li></ul><ul><li>Use Non-Verbal Cues </li></ul>
    13. 13. Seeing <ul><li>Dialogue “is about discussing something openly and breaking through to new knowledge or insight.” </li></ul><ul><li>─ Danah Zohar </li></ul>
    14. 14. The Procedure <ul><li>Form a circle of chairs (no table). </li></ul><ul><li>Write a challenge question. </li></ul><ul><li>Name a recorder. </li></ul><ul><li>Pull an item from the bag and answer the question: “In what ways is our challenge like this object?” </li></ul><ul><li>Takes notes. </li></ul>
    15. 15. The Procedure <ul><li>Ask clarifying questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Pass the ball to another. </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize the group’s ideas. </li></ul>
    16. 16. We Agree To . . . <ul><li>Only the one with the ball can talk. </li></ul><ul><li>No interruptions. </li></ul><ul><li>No debates. </li></ul><ul><li>No give-and-take or pro-and-con. </li></ul><ul><li>The one with the ball can talk as long as he wants. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Principles of Creative Thinking <ul><li>Random Association </li></ul><ul><li>Quantity breeds Quality </li></ul><ul><li>Deferred Judgment </li></ul>Source: Michael Michalko, Thinkertoys .
    18. 18. Becoming Real <ul><li>“ Real isn't how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It's a thing that happens to you. . . .” “Does it hurt?” asked the Rabbit. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sometimes,” said the Skin Horse. When you are Real you don't mind being hurt. . . . It doesn't happen all at once, . . . You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in your joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand” </li></ul><ul><li>─ Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit , 1922 </li></ul>

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