How to Instill Higher Values

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There is a word that politicians love to throw out whenever they consider that it might accrue some advantage for them. I'm talking about values. As one commentator put it: "Values, values everywhere." Then she went on to list the ways the term was used in a recent political rally: "American values, working-class values, heartland values, mainstream values, blue-collar values, democratic values" and the list goes on (Goodman, 2004). In spite of the overuse and, at times abuse, of the word, values continue to be the central issue for society today, because they give direction and meaning to our lives. In this presentation, I want us to look at what values are, what the Bible says about them, why they are important and how they become embedded in our hearts.

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  • I really enjoyed the information in your presentation! I tsalk of similar principals in my presentation Promoting Peace. Thanks for the great sourcing as well!
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  • Its a good sideshow it will help people to know about higher values. Some valuable information is here regarding higher education, studies.
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  • Very nice presentation. Please have a look on values we have to share:

    http://www.slideshare.net/Lenze/me-i-do-my-best-to-save-the-planet
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  • I was walking through Target the other day with my family. We were looking for a teakettle because, having just arrived from Argentina, our things had not yet arrived and we lacked some basic kitchen utensils. As I walked past aisle after aisle of merchandise, the place began to produce a dizzying effect. We were inundated with stuff. Just about the time I was ready to say, \"Let's get out of here,\" I overheard two teenage girls rapidly walking down the aisle. One said, “I want to get a CD, how about you? I just gotta get the latest CD of”--she then named someone I had never heard of. There wasn't anything earth-shaking about this interaction. It just made me think about the stuff that we value so much. From the excitement with which she sought that CD, one could draw the conclusion that her happiness and well-being was dependent--at least on that night--on whether or not she could find that particular CD and purchase it. I have a feeling, however, that once having purchased and listened a couple times to it, she might soon need another CD to produce the same effect.
  • This experience brought into sharp focus for me a topic that is on the lips of politicians a lot lately. I'm talking about values. As one commentator put it: \"Values, values everywhere.\" Then she went on to list the ways the term was used in a recent political rally: \"American values, working-class values, heartland values, mainstream values, blue-collar values, democratic values\" and the list goes on (Goodman, 2004).In spite of the overuse and, at times abuse, of the word, values continue to be the central issue for society today, because they give direction and meaning to our lives. In this presentation, I want us to look at what values are, what the Bible says about them, why they are important and how they become embedded in our hearts.
  • Sociologist Han Joas defines values as \"the ideals that attract us and give our lives meaning\" (Joas, 2000, p. 125). Notice in Joas’ definition the idea of attractiveness. This means that when something is really one of our core values, we are moved from within to pursue it. Nobody has to coerce us or obligate us. A clear sign that we have come across a real values is that the motivation flows from within.
  • Sociologist Han Joas defines values as \"the ideals that attract us and give our lives meaning\" (Joas, 2000, p. 125). Notice in Joas’ definition the idea of attractiveness. This means that when something is really one of our core values, we are moved from within to pursue it. Nobody has to coerce us or obligate us. A clear sign that we have come across a real values is that the motivation flows from within.
  • Another writer defines a value as: \"a belief that something is good and desirable. It defines what is important, worthwhile and worth striving for\" (Barthorpe, 2000, p. 338). When talking about the kind of belief that creates values, we’re not just talking about intellectual assent. When it comes to values, the heart has been convinced that this is the way things should be done or that this is what we want to achieve. Consequently, values energize us; they are the driving forces behind out actions.
  • Referring to Christians, church consultant Aubrey Malphurs writes: Values are \"the invisible motivators that move people's hearts toward meaningful ministry\" (Malphurs, 1996, p. 23).Malphurs here touches on the fact that values are what give meaning to our lives. This is an important principles when it comes to trying to motivate others. We must tap into their real values. If all we do is push for our own values, without considering the values of those we serve, then we will only produce a kind of conformity, which is far inferior to true commitment. We need to study the values of our followers and then try to link their values into the values of the church.
  • I now want to describe some of the characteristics of a value, so that we can know them when we see them.First, values always entail an emotional element. They provoke strong emotions in the form of joy, enthusiasm, anger, and rage.One of the surest ways to identify your core values is to take notice of the things that make you angry.
  • What people often don’t realize is that values have a dual focus; they tell us not only WHAT we want to achieve but also HOW we think is the best way to achieve that outcome.This is a crucial point to understand if you are going to be successful in ministry. Christian generally agree on WHAT we’re trying to achieve. Where we sometimes bitterly differ is in regard to the HOW. To make things worse, we don’t even recognize that this is a core value working under the surface of our interactions.Let me give you an example. After many days of planning and preparation, we finally held our very first outreach program for youth in Uruguay. A lot of things went wrong. The following day, I felt it would be good to sit down with one of my co-workers who happened to be Uruguayan, and analyze what went wrong and what went right. I called him into my office and I began analyzing all the things that went wrong. My thought was that this was a great learning opportunity. He was devastated and began literally weeping. After things calmed down and we were able to reflect on what had happened, I discovered that he also believed in feedback and analysis, but that was simply NOT the right way to do it.
  • The technical term for these the long-range desired outcomes is that they are TERMINAL values, in other words, they are what we want at the end of the road.HOW we plan to get there are called OPERATIONAL values.
  • The technical term for these the long-range desired outcomes is that they are TERMINAL values, in other words, they are what we want at the end of the road.HOW we plan to get there are called OPERATIONAL values.
  • The technical term for these the long-range desired outcomes is that they are TERMINAL values, in other words, they are what we want at the end of the road.HOW we plan to get there are called OPERATIONAL values.
  • This is a list of some values that fit into the Terminal category. You will notice that they all have to do with some desired final state. Note also that I have deliberately tried to avoid special religious vocabulary (except for the case of “salvation”).It’s a tricky think to try to get a church group to identify their values because Christians tend to believe that the question of values has already been settled and that there is not room for diversity. This tendency becomes especially acute when we add in religious lingo like: win the world for Christ or “Receive Jesus at the Second Coming.” The problem with these values is that there is no room for divergence, even if there is divergence. Who would dare to contradict?
  • With this list, you should notice a difference. They all have to do with HOW we thing our business should be conducted, no matter what that business is. Are we confrontational or conciliatory?Should we use logic or appeal to feelings?Should we follow our impulse or repress that impulse?Should we use loud music or quiet music?Like I say, these are the values that most often cause the fights in the church.
  • Jesus spoke quite often about values, though I don’t think He often used the word as we are using it. He spoke of treasure hidden in a field that was so highly valued that it motivated a man to sell all that he had, just so that he could purchase that field and obtain that treasure.A core value will motivate you to give up everything for its achievement. Notice for example how some people are willing to lose everything to cocaine: because their ultimate value was self-indulgence and pleasure.Jesus was saying that if we truly understood in the depths of our hearts the value of the kingdom, we would be willing to give up everything and anything to acquire it.
  • Getting back to the theme of how to identify a core value, there are four signs:First, there is the desire to protect it. If it’s a core value, you will find yourself fighting to protect and preserve it.Then there is an impulse to do something about it. A core values ALWAYS leads to action. If you’re not acting on it, then it’s not really a core value.Third, again is the element of emotion. Core values spark emotions.Finally, a core value is the thing we focus our minds and energies on.
  • Getting back to the theme of how to identify a core value, there are four signs:First, there is the desire to protect it. If it’s a core value, you will find yourself fighting to protect and preserve it.Then there is an impulse to do something about it. A core values ALWAYS leads to action. If you’re not acting on it, then it’s not really a core value.Third, again is the element of emotion. Core values spark emotions.Finally, a core value is the thing we focus our minds and energies on.
  • Getting back to the theme of how to identify a core value, there are four signs:First, there is the desire to protect it. If it’s a core value, you will find yourself fighting to protect and preserve it.Then there is an impulse to do something about it. A core values ALWAYS leads to action. If you’re not acting on it, then it’s not really a core value.Third, again is the element of emotion. Core values spark emotions.Finally, a core value is the thing we focus our minds and energies on.
  • Getting back to the theme of how to identify a core value, there are four signs:First, there is the desire to protect it. If it’s a core value, you will find yourself fighting to protect and preserve it.Then there is an impulse to do something about it. A core values ALWAYS leads to action. If you’re not acting on it, then it’s not really a core value.Third, again is the element of emotion. Core values spark emotions.Finally, a core value is the thing we focus our minds and energies on.
  • Getting back to the theme of how to identify a core value, there are four signs:First, there is the desire to protect it. If it’s a core value, you will find yourself fighting to protect and preserve it.Then there is an impulse to do something about it. A core values ALWAYS leads to action. If you’re not acting on it, then it’s not really a core value.Third, again is the element of emotion. Core values spark emotions.Finally, a core value is the thing we focus our minds and energies on.
  • Values are caught more than they are taught.
  • IntroductionLast Sunday we introduced the topic of values. We said . . .1. Values are the beliefs that lie behind, support and energize the things we do and the goals we try to achieve.2. We talked about Jesus' parable of the pearl of great value and what that story teaches about values.We get values from being a member of a community, from having good models who we love and respect, and from an open dialogue with these models about what is truly valuable.Today I want to continue with this theme and talk about how values are different from ethics and what that difference means for our efforts to influence people for Jesus.Proposition: Because values are personal and experiential, influencing them will take more than scheduling another Bible study.
  • IntroductionLast Sunday we introduced the topic of values. We said . . .1. Values are the beliefs that lie behind, support and energize the things we do and the goals we try to achieve.2. We talked about Jesus' parable of the pearl of great value and what that story teaches about values.We get values from being a member of a community, from having good models who we love and respect, and from an open dialogue with these models about what is truly valuable.Today I want to continue with this theme and talk about how values are different from ethics and what that difference means for our efforts to influence people for Jesus.Proposition: Because values are personal and experiential, influencing them will take more than scheduling another Bible study.
  • IntroductionLast Sunday we introduced the topic of values. We said . . .1. Values are the beliefs that lie behind, support and energize the things we do and the goals we try to achieve.2. We talked about Jesus' parable of the pearl of great value and what that story teaches about values.We get values from being a member of a community, from having good models who we love and respect, and from an open dialogue with these models about what is truly valuable.Today I want to continue with this theme and talk about how values are different from ethics and what that difference means for our efforts to influence people for Jesus.Proposition: Because values are personal and experiential, influencing them will take more than scheduling another Bible study.
  • IntroductionLast Sunday we introduced the topic of values. We said . . .1. Values are the beliefs that lie behind, support and energize the things we do and the goals we try to achieve.2. We talked about Jesus' parable of the pearl of great value and what that story teaches about values.We get values from being a member of a community, from having good models who we love and respect, and from an open dialogue with these models about what is truly valuable.Today I want to continue with this theme and talk about how values are different from ethics and what that difference means for our efforts to influence people for Jesus.Proposition: Because values are personal and experiential, influencing them will take more than scheduling another Bible study.
  • IntroductionLast Sunday we introduced the topic of values. We said . . .1. Values are the beliefs that lie behind, support and energize the things we do and the goals we try to achieve.2. We talked about Jesus' parable of the pearl of great value and what that story teaches about values.We get values from being a member of a community, from having good models who we love and respect, and from an open dialogue with these models about what is truly valuable.Today I want to continue with this theme and talk about how values are different from ethics and what that difference means for our efforts to influence people for Jesus.Proposition: Because values are personal and experiential, influencing them will take more than scheduling another Bible study.
  • I. Values and Ethics: What are they and how are they different?A.Definitions and DistinctionsEthics: A code (standard, benchmark) for judging whether certain behaviors, ideas, and attitudes are right or wrong.Values: My personal sense of desirability toward certain behaviors, ideas and attitudes fashioned by experience.
  • I. Values and Ethics: What are they and how are they different?A.Definitions and DistinctionsEthics: A code (standard, benchmark) for judging whether certain behaviors, ideas, and attitudes are right or wrong.Values: My personal sense of desirability toward certain behaviors, ideas and attitudes fashioned by experience.
  • I. Values and Ethics: What are they and how are they different?A.Definitions and DistinctionsEthics: A code (standard, benchmark) for judging whether certain behaviors, ideas, and attitudes are right or wrong.Values: My personal sense of desirability toward certain behaviors, ideas and attitudes fashioned by experience.
  • I. Values and Ethics: What are they and how are they different?A.Definitions and DistinctionsEthics: A code (standard, benchmark) for judging whether certain behaviors, ideas, and attitudes are right or wrong.Values: My personal sense of desirability toward certain behaviors, ideas and attitudes fashioned by experience.
  • B. Because the direct verbal approach is almost always stated as an obligation. 1. One of the great philosophical debates: If behavior is enforced by sheer power or authority, can that behavior be motivated by love?2. If we value something, then we will not have to be obligated to pursue that value.3. The apostle Paul understood this concept. Paul was taking up a collection for the Christians who were suffering in Jerusalem. To do this, he had to appeal to their values. He knew that to make them do it would defeat his purposes. So, we wrote:\"Each one must do just as he has purposed in his heart, not grudgingly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver\" (2 Corinthians 9:7, NASB).4. Religion based on obligation will only produce a diluted form of ceremonialism that, instead of reflecting spiritual values, becomes in themselves the values of that church.
  • D. Ethics become VALUES when they have been proven by experience that they are the good and acceptable and perfect will of God.\"Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect\" (Romans 12:2, NASB).
  • E. Sociologists recognize the distinction between ETHICS and VALUES.1. The \"good\" and the \"right\" (Hans Joas).2. Ethics are \"formal and imperative,\" while values are experiential (Georg Simmel).3. Ethics relate to \"restrictive,\" while values attractive and motivating (Immanuel Kant).4. How do we make the law of God attractive to our hearts and motivating to our actions?5. Ethics refer to what SHOULD BE valued.6. Values refer to what IS valued.
  • E. Sociologists recognize the distinction between ETHICS and VALUES.1. The \"good\" and the \"right\" (Hans Joas).2. Ethics are \"formal and imperative,\" while values are experiential (Georg Simmel).3. Ethics relate to \"restrictive,\" while values attractive and motivating (Immanuel Kant).4. How do we make the law of God attractive to our hearts and motivating to our actions?5. Ethics refer to what SHOULD BE valued.6. Values refer to what IS valued.
  • E. Sociologists recognize the distinction between ETHICS and VALUES.1. The \"good\" and the \"right\" (Hans Joas).2. Ethics are \"formal and imperative,\" while values are experiential (Georg Simmel).3. Ethics relate to \"restrictive,\" while values attractive and motivating (Immanuel Kant).4. How do we make the law of God attractive to our hearts and motivating to our actions?5. Ethics refer to what SHOULD BE valued.6. Values refer to what IS valued.
  • E. Sociologists recognize the distinction between ETHICS and VALUES.1. The \"good\" and the \"right\" (Hans Joas).2. Ethics are \"formal and imperative,\" while values are experiential (Georg Simmel).3. Ethics relate to \"restrictive,\" while values attractive and motivating (Immanuel Kant).4. How do we make the law of God attractive to our hearts and motivating to our actions?5. Ethics refer to what SHOULD BE valued.6. Values refer to what IS valued.
  • E. Sociologists recognize the distinction between ETHICS and VALUES.1. The \"good\" and the \"right\" (Hans Joas).2. Ethics are \"formal and imperative,\" while values are experiential (Georg Simmel).3. Ethics relate to \"restrictive,\" while values attractive and motivating (Immanuel Kant).4. How do we make the law of God attractive to our hearts and motivating to our actions?5. Ethics refer to what SHOULD BE valued.6. Values refer to what IS valued.
  • C. This is where faith comes into play.1. Speaking of the eternal principles that come from God, Perry Pascarella writes:\"Faith leads to an understanding of these principles, which become translated into what we value; values then shape behavior; and feedback on our behavior strengthens our faith\" (Pascarella, 1999, p. 97).2. In other words: \"The righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith\" (Romans 1:17, NASB).TR: We have looked at the difference between values and ethics and at our need for faith to make the connection between God's standards and our experience. Now let's consider how this might affect our efforts to help others become followers of Jesus.
  • A. Because . . .1. Words are symbols representing experience.2. The further those words are from our experience, the less personal meaning they will have.3. The fact that we are trying to bring about change means that the words will necessarily be far removed from the experience of those we want to change.4. Therefore, depending solely on words will NEVER bring about a change in values.The most they can produce is conformity or verbal assent to the espoused values of the group . . . What Dallas Willard defined as \"dogma . . . what you have to believe whether you believe it or not.\"
  • C. There is an alternative. It is discipleship by invitation.1. Motivation in a relationship based on love takes the form of an invitation.2. According to the invitational model the teacher . . .a. Lives the experience.b. Invites the disciple to walk him in that experience.Conclusion: Instead of \"Let's do a Bible study.\"It becomes: \"Come and follow me as I follow Christ.\"
  • How to Instill Higher Values

    1. 1. HOW TO INSTILL HIGHER VALUES PM450 Leadership Principles Dr. Greg Waddell
    2. 2. Everybody Talks about Values American values Democratic values Working-class values Mainstream values Heartland values Blue-collar values
    3. 3. What are Values?
    4. 4. What are Values? The ideals that attract us and give our lives meaning” ‒ Hans Joas, 2000
    5. 5. What are Values? A belief that something is good and desirable. It defines what is important, worthwhile and worth striving for” ‒ Barthorpe, Duncan, & Miller 2000
    6. 6. What are Values? The invisible motivators that move people’s hearts toward meaningful ministry” ‒ Malphurs, 1996
    7. 7. What are Values? They have an emotional element
    8. 8. What are Values? They have to do with both . . . what and how
    9. 9. TWO KINDS OF VALUES Terminal OperatiOnal
    10. 10. TWO KINDS OF VALUES Terminal OperatiOnal
    11. 11. TWO KINDS OF VALUES terminal Operational
    12. 12. Examples of Terminal Values  A comfortable life  Happiness  An exciting life  Inner Harmony  Accomplishment  Mature love  World peace  Salvation  A world of beauty  National security  Equality  Social recognition  Family Security  True friendship  Freedom  Wisdom Adapted from Rokeach, 1979.
    13. 13. Examples of Operational Values  Hard-working  Honest  Broadminded  Imaginative  Capable  Independent  Cheerful  Logical  Clean  Intellectual  Courageous  Loving  Forgiving  Responsible  Helpful  Self-controlled
    14. 14. What does the Bible say? The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure hidden in the field, which a man found and hid again; and from joy over it he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field. Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant seeking fine pearls, and upon finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.” ‒ Mathew 13:44-46, NASB “
    15. 15. Elements of a Core Value
    16. 16. Elements of a Core Value  The desire to protect it
    17. 17. Elements of a Core Value  The desire to protect it  The impulse to do something
    18. 18. Elements of a Core Value  The desire to protect it  The impulse to do something  The element of emotion
    19. 19. Elements of a Core Value  The desire to protect it  The impulse to do something  The element of emotion  The element of focus
    20. 20. Why is it important to understand how values become embedded in the Human heart? ?
    21. 21. It will enable us to . . . Help others discover their values.
    22. 22. It will enable us to . . . Retain our values.
    23. 23. It will enable us to . . . Lead others toward eternal values.
    24. 24. Three keys to Values Transmission:
    25. 25. How do we get them? You shall teach them diligently to your sons and shall talk of them when you sit in your house and when you walk by the way and when you lie down and when you rise up. You shall bind them as a sign on your hand and they shall be as frontals on your forehead. You shall write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates. ‒ Deuteronomy 6:7-9
    26. 26. Three keys to Transmission: 1. Our Social Context
    27. 27. Three keys to Values Transmission:  The presence of a trusted and beloved mentor
    28. 28. Three keys to Transmission: 3. A workplace context that encourages dialogue.
    29. 29. Values are . . .
    30. 30. Values are . . . beliefs that lie behind,
    31. 31. Values are . . . beliefs that lie behind, support and energize
    32. 32. Values are . . . beliefs that lie behind, support and energize the things we do
    33. 33. Values are . . . beliefs that lie behind, support and energize the things we do and the goals we set out to achieve.
    34. 34. Turning Rules into Values
    35. 35. Definitions & Distinctions Ethics
    36. 36. Definitions & Distinctions Ethics A standard for judging whether something is right or wrong
    37. 37. Definitions & Distinctions Values
    38. 38. Definitions & Distinctions Values A personal sense of right and wrong fashioned from experience
    39. 39. NT Ethics is an Ethic of the Heart Each one must do just as he has purposed in his heart, not grudgingly or under compulsion.” ‒ 2 Corinthians 9:7
    40. 40. Proven by Experience “And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect.” --Romans 12:2, NASB
    41. 41. ETHICS VALUES
    42. 42. ETHICS VALUES The Right The Good
    43. 43. ETHICS VALUES The Right The Good Knowledge Experience
    44. 44. ETHICS VALUES The Right The Good Knowledge Experience Restrictive Attractive
    45. 45. ETHICS VALUES The Right The Good Knowledge Experience Restrictive Attractive What ought to be What IS
    46. 46. Where faith comes into play “Faith leads to an understanding of these principles, which become translated into what we value; values then shape behavior; and feedback on our behavior strengthens our faith” ‒ Pascarella, 1999, p. 97
    47. 47. Why Bible Studies Fail Words alone can never generate values.
    48. 48. An Alternative: Discipleship by Invitation
    49. 49. Discipleship by Invitation
    50. 50. Discipleship by Invitation Live the experience
    51. 51. Discipleship by Invitation Invite others to walk with you in that experience.
    52. 52. Four things your organization can do:
    53. 53. Four things your organization can do:  Reward what you value
    54. 54. Four things your organization can do:  Reward what you value  Measure what you value
    55. 55. Four things your organization can do:  Reward what you value  Measure what you value  Model what you value
    56. 56. Four things your organization can do:  Reward what you value  Measure what you value  Model what you value  Design life experiences of what you value
    57. 57. Works Cited Barthorpe, Stephen, Rosanna Duncan, and Christopher Miller. quot;The Pluralistic Facets of Culture and Its Impact on Construction.quot; Property Management 18, no. 5 (2000): 335-351. (25 June 2004). Joas, Hans, The Genesis of Values. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2000. Krishnan, Venkat R. quot;Impact of Transformational Leadership on Followers' Influence Strategies.quot; The Leadership & Organization Development Journal 25, no. 1 (2004): 58-72. (22 March 2004). Malphurs, Aubrey, Values-Driven Leadership: Discovering & Developing Your Core Values for Ministry. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 1996. New American Standard Bible, La Habra, CA: The Lockman Foundation, 1995. http://www.lockman.org. Pascarella, Perry, Christ Centered Leadership: Thriving in Business by Putting God in Charge. Rocklin, CA: Prima, 1999. Rokeach, Milton, Understanding Human Values Individual & Societal. New York: The Free Press, 1979.
    58. 58. Greg Waddell www.SpiritOfOrganization.com

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