Stackable Credentials
Credential Attainment in the public workforce investment system <ul><li>High priority performance goal to increase credent...
TYPES OF CREDENTIALS <ul><li>Education al diplomas, certificates and degrees.  </li></ul><ul><li>Registered  apprenticeshi...
Attributes of Career-Enhancing Credentials <ul><li>Industry-recognized </li></ul><ul><li>Stackable </li></ul><ul><li>Porta...
CareerOneStop online Tools to identify Credentials <ul><li>Searchable  Licensed Occupations  database (CareerOneStop) </li...
CareerOneStop Web site
Industry and Occupational Personnel Certifications
Sample: manufacturing personnel certifications
Database search—occupational licenses
Licensing results and links
Federally licensed occupations
Competency Model Clearinghouse
Competency Model Clearinghouse (search for Certifications)
Internet addresses <ul><li>Certification Finder </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.careerinfonet.org/certifications_new/defa...
Industry-Recognized  Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Industry examples </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Advanced Manufacturing </li></u...
Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>The Manufacturing Institute has endorsed a Manufacturing Skills Certific...
Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Advanced Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>The Manufacturing Institute has...
 
Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Center for Energy Workforce Development </li></ul><ul><li>Get into Energ...
Get Into Energy
Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Information Technology   </li></ul><ul><li>The Computing Technology Indu...
http://www.comptia.org/careers/backtowork.aspx
 
Allied Health Access Guidebook <ul><li>Guidebook and TEN:  http://wdr.doleta.gov/directives/attach/TEN/ten2010/ten10-10.pd...
Case Studies <ul><li>The AHA! Guidebook presents case studies on seven programs which have successfully incorporated oppor...
<ul><li>Career pathway systems provide a clear sequence of education coursework or training credentials and have the follo...
https://learnwork.workforce3one.org/page/home Learn More: Career Pathways  Community of Practice  Web Site
<ul><li>LINKS TO MODEL CAREER PATHWAY PROGRAMS (cont.) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Arkansas Career Pathways,”  http:// www.arpathw...
Credentials for  Older Youth New York City Out-of-School Youth Program (OSY)
The Hard Facts <ul><li>Over 30% unemployment rate for young adults (16-21) </li></ul><ul><li>Approximately 200,000 NYC you...
OSY Program Highlights <ul><li>$11.8 million annual budget </li></ul><ul><li>1,341 youth served in Program Year ’10-’11 </...
Participant Demographics <ul><li>Gender </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Males: 55%  </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Females:...
Participant Barriers <ul><li>Basic skills deficient (below 9.0 math & reading): 76% </li></ul><ul><li>Needs additional ass...
Focusing on Credentials <ul><li>In our 2009 RFP, providers were asked to identify one single area of occupational training...
The Results <ul><li>Occupational training in high growth industry sectors:  retail/customer service, healthcare, construct...
Examples of Credentials Offered CUNY NYS Dept of Health Certified Nursing Assistant Swiss Post Solutions Microsoft Adminis...
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Learning Session 2-6 Stackable Credentials

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Learn first hand about the different characteristics of credentials and information resources for you to use to identify available credentials. The New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD) will share their strategies for working with vendors and partners to provide resources, information and programming focusing on career pathways and credential attainment.

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  • Source : U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System Glossary http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/glossary On the Office of Apprenticeship Sponsors website at http://www.doleta.gov/oa/links.cfm visitors can find information on the occupations and sponsors of registered apprenticeship programs in their state
  • This online tool contains federal and state-provided information including: Licensing agency name, address, and contact information, including Internet links if available; license description and applicable fees; and examination requirements, if applicable.
  • We are going to look at several examples of credentials that have several of these attributes in that they are: Industry-recognized Stackable And often Portable We are also going to look at how industry competency models can provide a framework for sequencing or “stacking” credentials
  • The first example is a national sequence of stackable credentials in Advanced Manufacturing, developed by a variety of organizatoins and endorsed by the Manufacturing Institute, which is also and aligned with an Advanced Manufacturing Comptency Model developed in partnership with ETA
  • This is an example that shows how education credentials, certification, and work experiences can be used together to build a career pathway in Advanced Manufacturing The left-hand column shows an Education Pathway with a certificate program in the lower-left, going up through an Associate’s degree program, to a bachelor’s degree program The center columns shows a number of personnel Certifications, including ones from the National Institute for Metalworking Skills, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers The right-hand column shows corresponding jobs However, an individual doesn’t have to strictly follow up through a single column—someone could perhaps start with an educational certificate, get some work experience, and then prepare and test for certain personnel certifications to move up on the career pathway—before going back to school to obtain an educational degree perhaps.
  • The Center for Energy Workforce Development (CEWD) is also in the process of developing a sequence of stackable credentials for energy utility industry workers. This sequence of stackable credentials is also being developed in alignment with an industry competency model framework (also available on the ETA-sponsored Competency Model Clearinghouse)
  • The CEWD is working with the Center for Adult and Experiential Learning to assist them in developing the career pathway and sequence of stackable credentials.
  • The Information Technology field, or IT, has probably the greatest number of personnel certifications. In fact, there are so many, and they are updated quite frequently, based on changes in technology, and releases of new version, that it can be quite daunting for an individual, or a workforce system professional to keep up with and be knowledgeable about them all. A number of organizations provide information on IT credentials and the Computing Technology Industry Association or CompTIA has developed a few online tools to help individuals search for and learn about available IT credentials
  • Here is the homepage for the Getting America Back to Work site sponsored by CompTIA that let’s individuals do Assessment Search for training Search for Certifications And help them seek employment placements
  • SAY: As I explained earlier, we worked with OVAE at the Department of Education to consult practitioners and talk to experts on career pathways. Based on these consultations, ETA and OVAE have identified 6 key elements – not steps, but elements. These 6 elements need to all be operating at the same time in career pathway systems. The experience of career pathway experts has shown that you’ll need to keep going back and working on these elements. SHOW THE SUB-BULLETS AND SAY: The Departments of Labor and Education have listened to feedback from workforce and education professionals and have looked at countless career pathway systems. They have identified 6 key elements of successful career pathway systems: Cross-agency partnerships Employer engagement Adult-centered program design Identified funding needs and sources Aligned policies and programs Measurement of system change and performance evaluation SAY: The purpose of this framework is to give us a way to take this very broad definition of career pathways and operationalize it. How do we make them happen? What do we actually need to do to make them happen? TRANSITION: Let’s examine each of these elements a little bit more closely. Switch to the next slide. NOTES Note that the graphic will appear first. The first level bullet will automatically appear after a delay of 2 seconds. All the sub-bullets will appear as one object when you hit page down, or hit arrow down, or click your mouse on the screen. This will allow you to show the elements only when you’re ready to speak about them.
  • SAY: Also an excellent resource for you is the “Career Pathways Community of Practice” web site, which has information and tools from the field on career pathways. Switch to the next slide. NOTES Note that the graphic will automatically appear.
  • SAY: The resources also include some related studies that show the benefits of a career pathway approach. Switch to the next slide. NOTES Note that the text of the whole slide will appear all at once.
  • Learning Session 2-6 Stackable Credentials

    1. 1. Stackable Credentials
    2. 2. Credential Attainment in the public workforce investment system <ul><li>High priority performance goal to increase credential attainment by 10% systemwide </li></ul><ul><li>Guidance to system—Training and Employment Guidance Letter 15-10 with Credential Resource Guide </li></ul><ul><li>Technical assistance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Webinar(s) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presentations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promising practices from grantees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing efforts to add credentials and information on their value to electronic tools </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. TYPES OF CREDENTIALS <ul><li>Education al diplomas, certificates and degrees. </li></ul><ul><li>Registered apprenticeship certificates; </li></ul><ul><li>Occupational licenses (typically awarded by State government agencies). </li></ul><ul><li>Personnel certifications from industry or professional associations. </li></ul><ul><li>Other skill certificates for specific skill sets or competencies within one or more industries or occupations. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Attributes of Career-Enhancing Credentials <ul><li>Industry-recognized </li></ul><ul><li>Stackable </li></ul><ul><li>Portable </li></ul><ul><li>Accredited </li></ul><ul><li>Labor Market Value </li></ul><ul><li>Return on Investment </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of Credit for Prior Learning </li></ul>
    5. 5. CareerOneStop online Tools to identify Credentials <ul><li>Searchable Licensed Occupations database (CareerOneStop) </li></ul><ul><li>Certification Finder tool to identify industry or occupational personnel certification </li></ul><ul><li>Competency Model Clearinghouse Resource database </li></ul>
    6. 6. CareerOneStop Web site
    7. 7. Industry and Occupational Personnel Certifications
    8. 8. Sample: manufacturing personnel certifications
    9. 9. Database search—occupational licenses
    10. 10. Licensing results and links
    11. 11. Federally licensed occupations
    12. 12. Competency Model Clearinghouse
    13. 13. Competency Model Clearinghouse (search for Certifications)
    14. 14. Internet addresses <ul><li>Certification Finder </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.careerinfonet.org/certifications_new/default.aspx </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Licensed Occupations Database </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.careerinfonet.org/licensedoccupations/lois_keyword.asp?nodeid=16&by=keyword </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Competency Model Clearinghouse Find Resources Database </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.careeronestop.org/competencymodel/search.aspx </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Industry examples </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Advanced Manufacturing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information Technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthcare </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Often based on industry competency models </li></ul>
    16. 16. Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>The Manufacturing Institute has endorsed a Manufacturing Skills Certification System </li></ul><ul><li>Center for Energy Workforce Development— Get into Energy Career Pathways Model </li></ul><ul><li>The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) has developed several online tools, including Getting America Back to Work </li></ul><ul><li>Youth office guide to Allied Health Access </li></ul>
    17. 17. Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Advanced Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>The Manufacturing Institute has endorsed a Manufacturing Skills Certification System </li></ul><ul><li>Pilot implementation through community colleges </li></ul><ul><li>Enable participants to advance along a manufacturing career pathway </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning at entry level work readiness and employability skills to technical competencies associated with specific types of manufacturing </li></ul>
    18. 19. Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Center for Energy Workforce Development </li></ul><ul><li>Get into Energy Career Pathways Model </li></ul><ul><li>3 categories of education and training that align with the tiers of the Energy Competency Model: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic Training (Tiers 1-3), </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Industry Fundamentals (Tiers 4-5) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Job Specific Skills and Credentials (Tiers 6-8). </li></ul></ul>
    19. 20. Get Into Energy
    20. 21. Industry-Recognized Stackable Credentials <ul><li>Information Technology </li></ul><ul><li>The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) has developed several online tools </li></ul><ul><li>The Getting America Back to Work (GABTW) site guides individuals through an integrated process: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1) Assessment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2) Training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>3) Certification </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>4) Job placement </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>At each stage, there are referrals to relevant information—including to local One-Stop Career Centers and other training resources </li></ul>
    21. 22. http://www.comptia.org/careers/backtowork.aspx
    22. 24. Allied Health Access Guidebook <ul><li>Guidebook and TEN: http://wdr.doleta.gov/directives/attach/TEN/ten2010/ten10-10.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Webinar: https://www.workforce3one.org/view/3001020731355402831/info </li></ul>
    23. 25. Case Studies <ul><li>The AHA! Guidebook presents case studies on seven programs which have successfully incorporated opportunities for access to allied health occupations into their youth services design. </li></ul><ul><li>The studies represent a range of strategies. Some are specifically summer programs and others focus on older out-of-school youth. </li></ul><ul><li>The case studies provide a variety of approaches that can assist local officials in planning programs, resources for more information about allied health and contact information for each of the studies. </li></ul>Allied Health Access (AHA!) Guidebook
    24. 26. <ul><li>Career pathway systems provide a clear sequence of education coursework or training credentials and have the following elements: </li></ul>Six Key Elements of Career Pathway Systems Implementing Career Pathways ♦ Page <ul><ul><li>Build cross-agency partnerships & clarify roles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify industry sector or industry & engage employers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design education & training programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify funding needs & sources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Align policies & programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Measure system change & performance </li></ul></ul>
    25. 27. https://learnwork.workforce3one.org/page/home Learn More: Career Pathways Community of Practice Web Site
    26. 28. <ul><li>LINKS TO MODEL CAREER PATHWAY PROGRAMS (cont.) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Arkansas Career Pathways,” http:// www.arpathways.com/home.html </li></ul><ul><li>“ Capital Idea: Austin, Texas, Career Pathways Initiative,” http://www.capitalidea.org/academic_sponsorship/becoming_participant/career_research.html </li></ul><ul><li>RELATED STUDIES </li></ul><ul><li>“ Charting a Path: An Exploration of the Statewide Career Pathway Efforts in Arkansas, Kentucky, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin,” prepared by Rosanna Perry Stephens, Seattle Jobs Initiative, May 2009. http://www.workingpoorfamilies.org/pdfs/Career_Pathways_Report.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>“ Underserved Students Who Earn Credit Through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Have Higher Degree Completion Rates and Shorter Time-to-Degree,” research brief published by the Council for Adult & Experiential Learning, http://www.cael.org/pdf/PLA-Underserved.pdf </li></ul>Additional Resources (cont.) Implementing Career Pathways ♦ Page
    27. 29. Credentials for Older Youth New York City Out-of-School Youth Program (OSY)
    28. 30. The Hard Facts <ul><li>Over 30% unemployment rate for young adults (16-21) </li></ul><ul><li>Approximately 200,000 NYC youth that are not in school and are not working between the ages of 16-24 </li></ul><ul><li>Disconnected youth competing with college graduates, career changers, and mature workers for jobs during the economic downturn </li></ul><ul><li>A high school diploma alone is insufficient </li></ul><ul><li>Educational and occupational skills and credentials are a must to remain competitive </li></ul><ul><li>Research has shown that those with both a high school diploma and college credits earn higher wages than someone with only a GED or HS diploma </li></ul>
    29. 31. OSY Program Highlights <ul><li>$11.8 million annual budget </li></ul><ul><li>1,341 youth served in Program Year ’10-’11 </li></ul><ul><li>25 contracts with 20 community-based organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Grant from NYS Office of Children and Family Services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Serve 90 youth who are exclusively 19-21 year olds and are “hard-to-serve” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Runaway/homeless, ex-offender, youth with disabilities, and foster-care/aging out </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>All programs have a mix of occupational, educational, employment, and support services </li></ul>
    30. 32. Participant Demographics <ul><li>Gender </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Males: 55% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Females: 45% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Age breakdown </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>16 – 18 year olds: 28% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>19 – 21 year olds: 72% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Educational status at enrollment </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>HS dropouts: 46% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>HS graduate: 46% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Have GED: 8% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Race/ethnicity: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Black/African-American: 53% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hispanic/Latino: 36% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>White: 1% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Asian/Pacific Islander: 8% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other: 2% </li></ul></ul></ul>
    31. 33. Participant Barriers <ul><li>Basic skills deficient (below 9.0 math & reading): 76% </li></ul><ul><li>Needs additional assistance to get a job: 25% </li></ul><ul><li>Difficulty speaking English: 10% </li></ul><ul><li>TANF recipient: 5% </li></ul><ul><li>Safety Net recipient: 3% </li></ul><ul><li>Food Stamp recipients: 21% </li></ul><ul><li>Other Barriers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Foster Care: 4% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Homeless: 5% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Runaway: 0.5% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offender: 2% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth Parent: 21% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth Pregnant: 0.5% </li></ul></ul>
    32. 34. Focusing on Credentials <ul><li>In our 2009 RFP, providers were asked to identify one single area of occupational training that would provide employment and career opportunities for disconnected youth </li></ul><ul><li>Development of a strategic collaborator for the occupational training component </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic collaborator can be an employer, labor union, or advanced occupational training program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Role would be to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Help develop training curriculum </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provide direct services or job opportunities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assist with post-placement activities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Help provide some supportive services (i.e. counseling, crisis intervention, housing referral, health insurance, additional placement, educational enrichment, etc.) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    33. 35. The Results <ul><li>Occupational training in high growth industry sectors: retail/customer service, healthcare, construction, hospitality/tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Some trainings offered include: union pre-apprenticeship, customer service, security-guard, Microsoft applications, burglar/fire alarm installation, food preparation, building maintenance, and CDL training </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic partnerships help contractors retain youth and prepare them for placements after program exit </li></ul>
    34. 36. Examples of Credentials Offered CUNY NYS Dept of Health Certified Nursing Assistant Swiss Post Solutions Microsoft Administrative Assistant Solar One Building Performance Institute Building Auditor Local #28 International Union of Sheet metal Workers Sheet Metal Worker CUNY US Dept of Labor/OSHA Green Construction NYS Restaurant Association, Monroe College NYC Dept of Health Food Preparation CUNY NYS Dept of Health Emergency Medical Tech CUNY, CVS, The Gap, Staples National Retail Federation Customer Service Strategic Partner(s) Issuing Agency Occupation
    35. 37. Questions

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